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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

May 1993 Farmers market (Continued from Page 14) NO OBLIGATION —Btole correspondence course. Church of Christ, POB 268, Ctoverdale.Va 24077. FOR SALE — 1990 Bayliner boat, 20 ft., 120 H.P. Call 804-561-3789, after 6 p.m., Amelia County. WANTED — Gibson, Fender, Martin, Gretsch, Rickenbacker.Danelectro, Moserite, Epiphone or any other name brand American made guitars, bass guitars, banjos, mandolins or amplifiers. Paying top dollar cash. Especially wanted are models built before 1975, but all considered. Premium prices paid for Fender Stratocaslers and Telecasters buM in the'sos and'6os and Les Paul models bui in the'sos. Also buying original sales catalogs, promotional material, or anything dealing with the above brands of instruments. If you have any of the above for sale, call collect 703-382-4027 or write Karry East, 385 Tanglewood Drive, Christiansburg, Va 24073. DANDELION WlNE—easy recipe, $2 and S AS.E to Coins, POB 365, Tasley, Va 23441. WANTED TO BUY OR TRADE — Winston Cup p...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

— Vol 52, No. 4 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS May 1993 vl Lazing the day away These Hoi steins on a farm in Fauquier County near Warrenton enjoy a sunny, warm April day— a break from all of the recent rainfall in Virginia— and wander to the fence to see who has come to interrupt their sunbathing. (Ptwto by Kathy Dixon) Membership discount 3 Smart snacks 7 Meat inspection 8 Flowering bulb care 11 Farm Bureau members will In this edition's wellness Read why scientists and Garden columnist Virginia now receive a 20-percent column, Jeanine Sherry Virginia Farm Bureau KLara Nathan writes about discount off a pair of glasses points out that snacking has support a stricter meat spring flowering bulbs and from Pearle Vision. gotten a bad reputation, but inspection program. how proper care will make isn't necessarily bad for you. them bloom beautifully each year. ► A full range of life insurance programs ► Some of Virginia's most competitive auto & home insurance...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

Vol 52, No. 5 Virginia farmers will feel impact of proposed energy tax By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor Farmers of all Virginia commodities will be hard pressed to make ends meet if President Clinton's energy tax plan is passed by Congress this summer, according to county Farm Bureau presidents across the state. Farmers would be hit from both sides —by higher fuel costs as well as increased electricity rates, the county leaders said. "Farmers generally operate on a very thin profit line," agreed C. Wayne Ashworth, president of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "When you're literally counting pennies in order to meet your bills, something like this tax could be the last straw." The Clinton administration has proposed placing a tax on all energy sources based on their energy rating, known as a British thermal unit, or Btu. A recent Virginia Farm Bureau Federation survey found that the proposed energy tax would cost Virginia farmers, depending on the size and type of farm they ope...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

2 Fruits of farm labor are paying off in legislature and in labs For all the problems that agriculture feces today—increased governmental regulations, low commodity prices, higher energy taxes and private property encroachment—there remain positive signs as well. I can attest to the fact that getting the former's point of view across to an increasing number of urban lawmakers is getting tougher and tougher. But the fruits of our labor are paying off not only in the halls of government, but also in the laboratory. There are virtually countless new technological advancements which offer hope for the future. For example, the tractor and plow, long a symbol of springtime farm work, are giving way to high-tech equipment—equip- ment that better protects the soil and water. Steadily replacing the plow are implements which combine soil conditioning with planting in one step. Specially designed planters are now being used which chisel seed into the ground through stubble left from the previo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

June 1993 June Dairy Month celebrates importance of dairy farmers and their products By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor Compared with the average price increase of 3.7 percent for all foods since 1984, dairy products have only increased 2.8 percent. And in 1991, when retail prices for all foods went up 2.9 percent, dairy product retail prices actually decreased 1.1 percent, according to the Southeast United Dairy Industry Association Inc., also known as SUDA. That's reason enough to honor dairy farmers during June, which is National Dairy Month. But there are plenty of other reasons as well. "Dairy farmers help produce milk— the most perfect food there is," said Hershel Gardner, chairman of Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Dairy Commodity Advisory Committee and a member of the VFBF board of directors. "We start out on milk and it's recommended all through life," Gardner added. And despite the feet that a "physician's committee" blamed milk for a variety of ills and urged people...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

4 Mark your calendar June 8: Public meeting on Chesapeake Bay Tributary strategies, Bird Hall, Room B-8, John Tyler Community College, Chester, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by the Virginia Chesapeake Bay Program. Call 804-786-4500. June 8-10: Aquaculture Conference, Sheraton Hotel, Dover, DE. Contact George Flick, Virginia Cooperative Extension, 703-231-6965. June 9-11: Farm Women's Forum, Washington. Contact Brad Lowery, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, 804-225-7525. June 9: Virginia Pork Festival, Emporia. Advance ticket purchases only. Call 804-634-6611. June 11-12: Eastern Stud Ram Show and Sale, Augusta Expo, Fishersville. Contact Steve Umberger, 703-231-9159. June 12-13: Chippokes Steam & Gas Engine Show, Chippokes Plantation State Park, Surry, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Parking, $1.50. Call 804-786-7950. June 12-13: Mason-Dixon Paso Fino Horse Show, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington. Contact Bonnie Marcum, 703-463-2194. June 13-16: American Dairy Science Association Annual Meeting, Univ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

June 1993 Convicted wetlands violator case illustrates regulatory problems By JOAN WALDOCH American Farm Bureau News Editor PETERSBURG—BiII Ellen doesn't think the punishment fit the crime. The 47-year-old environmental consultant from Mathews was released May 28 after serving a six-month sentence in the minimum-security section of the Federal Correctional Institute for violate ing section 404 of the Clean Water Act. He had been convicted in January 1991 by a Baltimore jury on five felony counts of filling 86 acres of wetlands without the proper permits. Government prosecutors claimed that Ellen ignored repeated warnings by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to stop all work until he could obtain the permits. They believe there was overwhelming evidence of his guilt, and that a prison term was an appropriate punishment for the crime. They successfully stopped efforts to seek a presidential pardon for Ellen late last year. But Ellen, who from 1987 to 1989 supervised the development of ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

6 Horse trail brochure available BLACKSBURG—The Virginia Horse Council recently compiled and published the second edition of public horse trails in Virginia. Compiled by Richard White, vice president of the horse council, the brochure lists the 64 trails in the state and outlines trail etiquette on the more than 1,400 miles of Virginia trails. For a free copy, write to the Virginia Horse Council, P.O. Box 72, Riner, Va 24149. FFA needs help The Virginia FFA Foundation wants people to donate money to its endowment fund. The foundation was formed to support activities of the FFA by providing funds for awards, scholarships, recognitions and Ceremony celebrates 50 billionth bushel of corn exported from the U.S CENTER CROSS—Virginia was one of 18 major corn-producing states that participated in the ceremonial shipment May 6 of the 50 billionth bushel of corn to be exported from the United States. The special bushel was placed aboard a ship bound for Japan from the port of New Orleans. Vi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

June 1993 Choosing bottled water can be a challenge NewWellness JeanineM. Sherry, M.S., R.I). President, NewWellness Inc. health and taste. Hie selection of bottled water products on the market is overwhelming. Since terminology isn't well regulated and most products don't list nutritional information on the labels yet, making a selection is challenging. Adding to the confusion is a recentlyintroduced category of "new age" beverages which combine sparkling water, sweeteners and fruit flavors marketed as healthy alternatives to carbonated soft drinks. (We'll see if they're worth their fizz a bit later.) To sort through the confusion, the International Bottled Water Association offers the following descriptions of the various products available: Drinking water This term on a label denotes water from a well or tap that has been processed in some way, usually filtered and disinfected, before bottling. Most bulk water falls into this category. Pesticide used for benefit of an endangered ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

8 Safe food supply evidenced by routine, surprise inspections (Continued from Page 1) "We'll get that fixed," she says to the nodding meat department employees. "Then Fll send you a bill for a pair of Topsiders," Ms. White jokes. She washes her hands for two reasons: to check for hot water and to sanitize her hands before touching the equipment. This turns out to be one of many times Ms. White washes her hands throughout the three-hour inspection. The meat department is thoroughly checked out—fir>m saws, choppers and grinders to the light fixtures above the cutting table. Ms. White looks for dirty equipment, fluorescent lights that aren't protected and coolers that aren't cold enough. She finds a knife sharpener with a little bit of meat residue on the handle and some broken tiles on the floor. "It looks pretty good," she says to Assistant Manager Aaron Farmer, who's come to observe the inspection. Once out of the meat department, Ms. White moves on to the section of the ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

June 1993 Proposed worker reform act would burden most Virginia farmers if passed By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—PeopIe opposed to the planned Agricultural Worker Protection Reform Act 0f1993 are calling it ludicrous, obnoxious and burdensome. "When I first saw the bill, I was floored," said Jane Futch, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation assistant public affairs director. "It's so obnoxious." "A lot of it is just ludicrous," echoed Lynn Gayle, an Eastern Shore tomato grower and member of Accomack County Farm Bureau. "It was dreamed up by somebody who doesn't realize how impractical it is." The AWPRA, introduced in March by representatives George Miller, D-Cal., Howard Berman, D-California, ana William Ford, D-Mich., calls for radical changes in the current Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act, or MSPA. The new bill would broaden MSPA, which currently only applies to farmers who hire migrant or seasonal workers, to cover all farm employment. It would ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

10 Health Insurance • M. iny .M<•!P>ltll I. ]. 'f ,it )l( •Id , ll!' '■. !!!U ■: jl- .'I in?.. 11. HHI■ hi 'l ..iUSt • of the steep increases in insurance premiums. • Many are not able to find adequate medical coverage. Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! Some of our members report savings of over $1000 a year in Insurance Premiums. — 111 — 1 - — - ~ / ' v • ' """" x > - < -**«> ; —v y Does Your Blue Cross and Blue Shield of I Your Current Including coverage in and out of the hospital. I l An Annual Out of Pocket Limit aJt\ 1 The maximum amount you will personally pay for | 1 covered services in any one year is limited. J 1 I 11 Dental Coverage Included %r\ | Prescription Drug Card I \%A I n. Vision Care Discount I To use the debtor or hospital of your choice/ I i A wide range of options to meet your budget needs. jk I . ■ Over 90 Farm Bureau Service Offices I |___i and Automatic Claims Filing I H We will provide y...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

June 1993 Members' opinions needed to form Farm Bureau policy Bureau policy is your policy. And if you want to help your county Farm J- Bureau develop policies on issues that will affect you, take a few minutes to fill out this questionnaire. The following questions relate to vital agricultural topics that affect farmers both directly and indirectly. Answers on completed questionnaires will be used in forming policies that will be voiced in the Virginia General Assembly. How Policies Develop Farm Bureau's policy development program provides Farm Bureau producer members an opportunity to participate in the policy development process and to reflect their attitudes. These policies are the basis for Farm Bureau's beliefe and related activities. District Policy Development Meetings Held in each of Farm Bureau's seven field districts. Allow key county Farm Bureau leaders to bring state and national issues to the surface and to hear forecasts on issues that likely will be considered on the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

12 Impact of tax would be felt by farmers (Continued from Page 1) While the Farm Bureau estimate form included only categories for fuel and fertilizer costs, formers realize that a Btu tax would be pervasive, costing them money throughout their farming operations. "Transportation costs alone would hurt many small, part-time farmers," Ashworth explained. "With fuel consumption averaging 5 miles to the gallon, a livestock vehicle can burn a lot of gas hauling cattle or hogs to market or to out-of-state feedlots." "The Clinton Btu tax would add another 5 cents a gallon to those costs. "I invite other farmers and all other Virginians to do a little figuring on their own to calculate the potential negative impact of the energy tax," he added. In addition, Ashworth said a true spending freeze would stop the continued grovvih of govmimeit spending without radically hurting social programs or the military budget. "Americans can't live with a growing budget deficit. A spending freeze is the ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

June 1993 1 1 Hfl ' MWMWII——HBaB ■ .L ■ M ■ ,-M ■ <« 9&&J, ME " ! ', f" Igp'-- ' ' *,"'''wTTf» **" *9 t, IMg || iff >. 25 '-"r'VWtF ' *-*aBMI HmL Tripling up on safety From left, Garnett Brockman, agency manager for Page County, Brenda Kemp, Robert Kemp II and Julian Sedwick, Page County Farm Bureau president, hold the Kemp triplets, Carttyn, Robert and Hayley, in their new Cosco car seats. Page County paid half the cost of the seats and Farm Bureau's Safety Department paid the other half. (Spadai photo) Horse industry is a hidden giant RICHMOND — Virginia's horse industry is a hidden giant in the agriculture sector, according to Dr. Kenneth Kopp, director of horse feed sales and marketing for Southern States Cooperative, Inc. Despite recent attention given to prospects of a pari-mutuel race track in Virginia, some people don't realize the horse industry is already a multi-million dollar venture, he said. A 1988 Virginia Tech study of th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $5.40 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge. member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) > Payment MUST accompany order. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. NO PHONE CALLS. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept/ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec./ Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMfTTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (Please fill in this new classified ad ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

June 1993 I Si :i ' : " ' I 1 4 ■ y -m ■■""& ,t . •■--■ --- inii*~ m?,--.■ I I vJfIjHF jfiyaH-* H 1 «»> I > ' -vyfe, s® "a ;38 f M a Mr :■&».?: ' f •* H • Hr — * w-*~ v +*■+ « +■ ; t * '>• « i '«*■"'■% « «** Getting the dust stined up Wayne Otto plants corn the conventional way on his farm along U.S. Route 360 in King William County. Planting season got a late start this year because of an UnUSUaI amount Of rain. (Photo fay Noon Hyde) Sunbelt Expo supported by Farm Bureau MOULTRIE, Ga.—Virginia Farm Bureau members have been supportive of the Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition, held here each October, according to Dr. Ed White, director of the Sunbelt Expo. Nelson Gardner, a Virginia farmer and former state and Southeastern winner of the Lancaster/Sunbelt Expo Farmer of the Year, said the Georgia farm show broadens the farmer's perspective. "It is well worth your time," Gardner said. "You see new ideas, meet a lot of people, and l...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1993

Vol 52, No. 5 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS June 1993 t "ji Hr ' A W Aw </ w^F ( jS 1. 1 1 mm pat 1' k ImKmhb^HHlHh Energy tax 1 Dairy month 3 Wetlands violator 5 T /mHing lab 8 Find out how President June is National Dairy Mathews native Bill EUen Read why Virginia Clinton's proposed energy Month and dairy farmers explains why he shouldn't Department of Agriculture tax will specifically affect are recognized for produc- have spent six months in a and Consumer Services farmers. ing wholesome, nutritious federal prison for wetlands consolidated laboratories food for Americans. violations. on edge of research. Spring planting A migrant worker sets tomato plants in a field near Modest Town in Accomack County. If a proposed Agricultural Worker Protection Reform Act is passed, this worker may get paid even when he's not working. See related story on Page 9. (Ph<*>by K*tty axon)

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

Far ni Bureau Vol 52, No. 6 Budget takes precedence over health care reform, senators say By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director WASHINGTON — Don't expect health care reform from the Clinton administration for at least another year, says U.S. Sen. John Warner, R-Va. Warner told the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Board of Directors May 26 that the battle over the Clinton budget plan will be so intense that national health care reform will just have to wait. "We (Congress) can't deal with it this year," he told the Farm Bureau leaders during a breakfast meeting that also included fellow U.S. Sen. Charles Robb, D-Va. Warner said the proposed energy tax plan would be far too involved to tackle another major issue in the next 12 months. "The tax bill that's $272 billion before the Senate at the very moment we're speaking... is going to consume all the VFB breaks own membership record §O u " '(' rj\ JjHiVf-ij iTOO Su u .11 » v _ t. l )'j i iL. ' > i TW>' V i iW ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

2 Peanut growers threatened by The quest for free trade across the globe is a noble objective of governments around the world. Farmers need the markets; consumers need the competition to keep prices affordable; and the United States needs the flexibility to expand exports. No question, eliminating trade barriers between our formers and those in Europe and other North American nations is a lofty goal in nearly every situation. Unless we are talking peanuts. While we agree knocking down trade barriers is a positive step in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade talks and the North American Free Trade Agreement, Farm Bureau also realizes there are sensitive commodities where farmers and whole communities stand to lose much more than they would gain from such an arrangement That's where the peanut issue comes in. If the new trade agreements do away with Section 22 of the American Agricultural Adjustment Act, which protects certain sensitive commodities including peanuts, sugar and c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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