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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

k REMARKABLE CURE What Clements Tonic can do In restoring the nerve» to healthy power and making the weakened system strong. A letter in point which is worth reading. No. 6 Post Office Plnce, South Melb;, 2/7/11. CLEMENTS T0RI6 LTD., " " Your tonic is otic of the quickest nerve and braih cures known. I tried all kinds of doctors>;medicines,and got t no relief as I have from .your, topic.'. I could'not stand Anyone talking to tne, or the liaise of . the town traffic.?; I lost appetite and weight' .1 was that' weak at times a child could push me over. I had to give up work. I layf hour after hour awake, now X, can. go to bed and almost sleep at ;bnce. . My case was one of the worst I ever heard of. I thought I would never get well. I can haTdly believe the relief I have got from Clementa-Tonic. Nearly all those symptoms I-told you of have left me, and two Or three,. more bottles will make me strong. Before this I was going twite a week to the Melbourne Hospital, and many people wer...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cycling & Motoring. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

.Appeals have been made to the Lon don aathorities to license women as taxi drivers. There are said to be a large number of taxi cabs lying idle in Lon don owing to want oE drivers, most of whom have already gone to the front. G. Spi Fey. a Melbourne motor cyclist, last Saturday putiupa fine speed perform ance in a half-mile flying test under official conditions and timing. The half-mile against wind was covered in 26-4/5 seconds, and with wind 26-1/5 seconds. This gives a mean of 26^ min utes, equal to a speed of just a fraction under 68 mile3 an hour. The machine used was a 8^ h.p. Twin Precision, and the performance is claimed to be an Aus tralian record for the power of machine used. ; ■ . Alfred Qronda, the Tasmanian crack, created a surprise in the first American championship event of the season, by winning from a very select field; Three Australians filled the places. Goulett be ing second, and Spears third; Frank Kramer, who has held the American championship for the last fo...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Splendid Gallantry. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

Splendid Gallantry. Not once, but many times, has Ser geant D. B. Bailey, of the R.G.A., proved that the blood of heroes runs through, his veins. One of his great est 'feats, however, was at Ypres on November 1, when he continued to work his gun after being wounded in the head by shrapnel bullet, and thus saved a critical situation. On the previous day, too, he had work ed his gun after regaining conscious ness, in spite of the fact that the breech mechanism of the gun being overheated, the result was premature firing, which caused the carriage to recoil on the brave sergeant, throw ing him down on several occasions.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Fighting the Hidden Death. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

Fighting the Hidden Death. Many a splendid story of heroism is being told of tlae mine-sweepers, those gallant men who, carrying their lives in their hands, scour the seas for the deadly 'mines which are such a menace to our Navy. One of these heroes has experienced on two separ ate occa&ions the sensation of being blown up in the trawler he happened to he in command of. This is Lieu tenant Boothby. On December 19 he was serving on the Orienda when it was blown up. Only one man of the crew was killed, and Lieutenant Boothby managed to get the remain ing members into safety,. while on January 6, while with the Banyers, he was again blown up. A very cool action, which resulted in the saving of his vessel, was .that of Lieutenant Crossley. A couple of explosions occurred beneath the stern of his trawler, the Star of Bri tain. Directing the crew to their sta tions, the lieutenant himself crawled into a narrow space near the screw shaft and ascertained the extent of the damage. T...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
£25,000 A YEAR FROM SONGWRITING. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

£25,000 A YEAR -FROM SONG WRITING. [ Ragtime 'may be on the decline, but the statement that Irving Berlin, the young Russian Jew who wrote "Alex ander's Ragtime Band," "Everybody's Doing It," "I Want to Be in Dixie," "That Mysterious Rag," and a dozen other ragtimes which have haunted people on both sides of the Atlantic, has earned as much as £25,000 a year in royalties from his songs, calls attention to the amazing success of this young composer. As a youth, Irving Berlin served in the dual role of waiter and entertain er in a small cafe in Chinatown, New York. He had been taught to sing by his father, and, having a natural' v aptitude for music and a gift of mim icry, quickly established himself as a popular favorite in Chinatown, where he would sing twenty to thirty songs a night. Possessing the knack of parodying popular songs, he quickly gained a lo cal reputation; but his real chance came when, after Longboat, the In dian runner, had defeated that won derful Italian, Dorando,...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LONGEVITY OF SEEDS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

I LONGEVITY OF SEEDS. The longevity of seeds is the sub ject of a communication made by Dr. Sliull to the "Plant World." It re counts the results of experiments made at Cold Siting Harbor, New York. A dam burst and consequent ly was drained. Within a few months a luxuriant vegetation sprang up on the dried floor. It was known that the pond had not been drained for at least seventy years. Yet from out the dried mud there arose in the spring some 140 species of flowering plants, many mosses, and at least one liver-wort. Of the flowering plants, a few we're perennials, and of these an aster and a splidago flower ed in the summer, and must, there fore, have grown from pieces of root storL:. Experiments were made with Lho seeds. Six lots of seeds of each of twenty-two species of "plants were placed in soil in large glass jars. The jars containing the soil were filled with water, were stored in a base ment room, and water was added from time to time in order to make good the loss by evapo...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Tricking the Enemy. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

Tricking the Enemy. There was a touch of comedy in the deed which won f$f Lance-Cor poral Sanderson, 14th London Regi ment, the D.C.M. at Givenchy on De cember 22. Fired upon by two sni pers at a range of twenty yards, he rushed at the men, presenting a pair of wire snippers, "which they took to be a revolver,/and made prisoners of both, notwithstanding that he was quite unarmed—an audacious act which is the joke of the Army.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Bravo, Bristow! [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

Bravo, Bristow! For cool daring it would be diffi cult to beat the heroism of Private W. J. T. Bristow, of the 3rd Rifle Brigade, at Armentieres, on the night of February 3. In company with an other man he crawled close to the German trenches to ascertain their movements. Returning to our lines he obtained a hand-grenade, went hack, and threw it amongst the Ger mans, scattering the enemy in all di rections. "To achieve his object/' says the official record, "it was ne cessary to crawl through the German wire entanglements, and the risk was very. great."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO KEEP NITRATE OF SODA. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

HOW TO KEEP NITRATE OF SODA. It often happens that at the end of the season a farmer has a bag or two of nitrate of soda left over. It is stored In a barn, and as nitrate lias the property of absorbing moisture from the air and becoming more or less deliquescent, a stream of liquid soon begins to ooze from the bags on to the floor. Thus a valuable part of the nitrate is lost before the time for its use comes around again. How can this loss be prevented? The following simple meth,od ttias been tried with success: — An old barrel, the head taken out, and the bottom covered w-ith a layer of about a couple of inches of cin ders; the bag with nitrate of soda put in, and also covered with, an inch or so of cinders, so that the bag of nitrate is completely covered. In that way the nitrate is protected against the humidity in the air, and may be kept quite well from one sea son to another, The cinders can [afterwards be mixed with the ni trate, so that it can be spread more evenly over the ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WAR BY MOTOR. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

WAR BY MOTOR. One of the most striking features of the present war is the great part which motor traction is playing. The motor 'bus carries troops to the trenches; commanders move from point to point in the fighting line in their motor-cars; practically all trans port is done by motor from the rail heads to the fighting line; guns are ; moved by motor; there are motor am bulances and motor kitchens, while the despatch-rider of to-day is no longer the dashing cavalryman, but the goggled motor-cyclist, who whiz zes along the roads at thirty to forty miles an hour. One of the motor novelties of the war is the motor distillery, in which vast quantities of water are sterilised instantaneously, and provide the troops with an abundance of perfect ly pure drinking water. These may be said to ruin alongside the motor kitchens, while the motor repairing -workshop, that runs on wheels, is I ready to go anywhere and every I where when a breakdown in guns or I engineering equipment necessitates...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AGRICULTURE. TIME TO APPLY FERTILISERS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

AGRICULTURE. TIME TO APPLY FERTILISERS. I Phosphatic manures, when used as I a top dressing for pastures, should I be applied, in late aritumn or winter, (so that the rains may wash it into ! the roots of the plants. There is no danger of this ingredient being wash ed into the subsoil and carried off in the drainage, as it becomes fixed in the soil, and is seldom found at a greater depth from the surface than nine inches. For cultivated, crops this manure should be applied with the seed, and always drilled into the ground, so that it may come into direct contact with the roots of the young plants. Potash should be applied to pasture land in the autumn, and en cultivated land it should always be applied some weeks previous to seed sow ing, but after the land is ploughed. In any case it should never be sown— except in very small quantities—in immediate contact with the seed, as it contains an injurious salt which in jures germination. When applied to the soil some time previous to see...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FROM THE FIRING LINE. Earned King Albert's Admiration. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 24 July 1915

FROM THE FIRING LINE. Earned King Albert's Admiration. It is with expressions of deepest admiration for our "heroic English women" that King Albert or' Belgium recently pinned cn the uniforms ol Miss Muriel Thompson, Sister Mary White, and Miss Margaret Waite— three nurses of the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry Corps—the Order of Leo pold II., for their bravery in the ad vanced trenches near Oostlcerke. Al though heavy firing was going on at the time, the three nurses advanced from one trench to another, often crawling to escape bullets and shells. In a little while they reached an out post, which consisted of a few cot tages huddled close together. As soon as they reached these, however, the Germans started shelling the place vigorously, several men being killed and wounded. But the three nurses refused to leave until they had attended some of the wounded who were near them. Then they found a stretcher, and with the aid of a man carried two wounded to safe ty under heavy fire, attended ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Find. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

A Find. "Halloa! what a find," said Gealo gist Number One. "Here is conclu sive proof of all our theories. See this rock? It is as round as a barrel, and just about the same shape and size. It must have rolled for ages in the bed of some swift stream. Note how smooth it is." "It is unlike any rock in this vicin ity," replied Gealogist Number Two. "It must hav.e been brought from a great distance, probably by some mighty iceberg in the ages that are gone." "There are mountains near here. It may have come down in a glacier," added another. "It is unlike any of the rock on these mountains. In fact, it is unlike any rock to be found on earth. Here comes a farm hand; I will ask him if there are any tradi tions concerning it. See here, my good man, do you knowT anything about this strange rock?" "Strange rock, sir?" said the farm hand in astonishment. "Why, that used to be a barrel of cement!" "Electricity in the atmosphere af fects your system," said the doctor-. "Yes," said the patient,...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Our Gallant Aviators. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

Our Gallant Aviators. i Yet another chapter to the story I of our galiant aviators has been add ' ed 'by Squadron Commander R. B. Davies and Plight Lieutenant R. E. ! Peirse, who have repeatedly attack i ed the German submarire stations at Ostend and Zeebrugge, although subjected on each occasion to heavy and accurate fire, their machines be ing frequently hit. Perhaps their most stirring feat was that which took place on January 23, when they each discharged eight bombs in an attack upon submarines alongside the mole at Zeebrugge, flying down at close i range. At the outset of this flight I Lieutenant Davies was severely i wounded by a bullet in the thigh, but i nevertheless he accomplished his l task, handling his machine for an hour with great skill in spite of pain and loss of blood.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GERMAN AIRSHIPS. Enemy's Four Types Described. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

GERMAN AIRSHIPS. Enemy's Four Types Described. I There are four types of German airships in use—the Zeppelin, Schntte Lanz, Parseval, and the military ship commonly known as the "M" type. In the earlier stages of the war papers were found on a dead German con taining outline sketches of the gen- : eral shape of these four types, to- j gether with the following instruc tions for distinguishing German and hostile airships: — "In order to distinguish German airships from foreign ones, the fol lowing is made known: (1) Zeppelin ships are to be recognised by their long stretched tubiform shape, and the two gondolas hanging under the I keel of the airship. The airships are covered with grey stuff, and carry behind them a series of steering sur faces. (2) The Schutte-Lanz airships have smaller fish-form bodies. They carry behind horizontal and vertical steering surfaces. Of the five gondo las two or three hang in the middle under the keel, and others to the right and left somewhat higher. ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Heroes of the Falcon. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

Heroes of the Falcon. Into a hail of lead steamed the lit tle destroyer Falcon, -when the Ger man rush upon Calais seemed irre sistible, and the British Navy -was called to the aid of the British and Belgians who desperately held on to what remained of the Belgian coast. Struck by a salvo of German shells, the commander of the Fallcon was killed at his post, and twenty-five offi cers and men of a crew of sixty were killed or wounded. The only man able to move on deck—Able Seaman Dimmock—at once, with magnificent : presence of mind, dashed to the helm, \ while among the prostrate figures was one that lifted itself and strove to assist the others, dying, with both | legs shattered. This was Petty Offi i cer Robert Chappell, who, in the hour ' of his agony, thought not of himself [ but of his comrades, with a splendor ■ of mind worthy of Philip Sidney. Ul ! timately the destroyer, no longer able : to play a part in the battle, steamed out of fire with her wounded and : dead, having won...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Great Cyclist. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

A Great Cyclist. How Corporal H. Wheeler extrica ted his patrol from a trap into "Which they had walked near La Bassee pro vides a stirring incident of the great fight at that point. While in charge of a patrol of twelve men, he entered the village at Lorgies and rode right into the enemy's "bivouac, not know ing that the place was occupied. Wheeler, however, with the greatest coolness and ability, extricated the •patrol with the less of only one man, and then formed up his party 300 yards from the village. Although ■greatly outnumbered, they delivered a most effective fire, which succeeded in stopping the enemy's advance un til the arrival of reinforcements, when the position was taken by us.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mortchup News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

The members of the Red Cross Branch met on 22nd inst., when all the wtfrk sent from the Ballarat Society was col lected and made ready for despatch. Donations amounting to £1 Os 6d and a parcel of towels were received. Mrs Flynn, of Mt Emu, presented the branch with a thousand Red Cross badges.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Pride of the 4th Middlesex. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

Pride of the 4th Middlesex. For many a day the gallantry and initiative of Private J. French "will be talked of by the 4th Middlesex, to which regiment he belongs. It was at Vierstraat on February 26 that a German bomb was thrown into our trenches, causing great destruction | and confusion. Private French at I once took charge, had the parapet manned, rapid fire opened on the en emy, wounded collected, and the fire in the dug-jut extinguished—all this with the utmost promptitude. Sub sequently he gave his attention to dressing the wounds of his comrades. Never was the D.C.M. more worthily won.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Football. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

The Berringa Clab seat a team of eight men to Linton last Saturday to play off the deciding match of the dis trict competition, Scarsdale having with drawn. Local players brought the visi tors up to full strength, but they were no match for the Warriors, and were de feated by 6 goals 11 bhds to 3 goals 5 bhds, Linton thus securing the premier ship. For the winners J. S. Hogan and E. Davies were the goal-kickers, and for the visitors Rachinger (capt.) kicked two goals and Reidy one. The local players shone out well in concerted players, and E. Sandow (capt.), J. S. Hogan, J. Hogan, W. Commons, and D. Uicol were especially good. Rachin ger, M'Keogh, and one or. two other3 played a good game for Berringa. A. Taylor acted as central umpire.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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