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Title: Queenslander, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 730,560 items from Queenslander, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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IMPORTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

IMPORTS. Queensland, s., from Northern Ports : 22 bales wool, 20 casks tallow, 91 hides, 2 bundles skins, 2 bales, Order; 2 bales, John Graham; 11 bales wool, Bright Brothers; 2 bales skins, G. Raff and Co.; 2 packages, W/ Harvey; 3 casks tallow, 30 hides, Mort and Co. The Queensland, s., left Rockhampton at 10.25 p.m. on Tuesday, cleared the Fitzroy at 2.20 a.m. on Wednesday, rounded Cape Capri corn at 5.30 a.m., and arrived at Glad stone at 9.30 a.m. She remained there until 2.15 pjn., and anchored off the Fairway buoy in Hervey's Bay at 4 a.m. on Thursday. At daylight she proceeded and got alongside the wharf at 10.15 am. At 11 a.m. she started for Brisbane and at 6.30 p.m. the same day she crossed Wide Bay Bar. Yesterday she entered Moreton Bay by the middle channel, steamed through Francis' Channel at 5.30 a.m., and ar rived at the Q.S.N. Co.'s wharf here at 7.30 a.m Light winds and fine weather prevailed throughout the passage.

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
LATEST Shipping Intelligence. ARRIVALS. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

LATEST Shipping Intelligence. ARRIVALS. Apbil 6.—Platypus, s.s., 185 tons, Captain Cairncross, from Rockhampton. April 6.—Queensland, Q.S.N. Co.'s s., 287 tons. Captain Hamlyn, from Rockhampton, Gladstone, and Maryborough. Passengers: Mrs. Hutton and family (2), Mrs. R. H. D. White, child, and servant, Miss Halloran, Messrs. White, J. Mollarde, Halloran, H. Don nelly, Markensie, W. Sutton, P. Barfoot, Dowe, Walker, A. Meiokle, E. Lloyd, W. M. Hutton, James, his Honor Judge Lutwyoho, Mr. Wright, and 53 in the steerage.

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
[BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH.] MARYBOROUGH. ARRIVAL. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

[BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH.] MARYBOROUGH. ARRIVAL. April 5.—Leichhardt, s., from Brisbane. DEPARTURE. April 6.—Leichhardt, s., for Gladstone and Rockhampton.

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
CAPE MORETON. [BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH.] April 6. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

CAPE MORETON. [BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH.] April 6. April 6. At 4 p.m., a vessel was in sight to the south, and at 4.30 p.m. another was in sight to the south-east.

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
ROCKHAMPTON. DEPARTURES. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

ROCKHAMPTON. DEPARTURES. April 5.—James Paterson, s.s., for Sydney; Williams, s., for Port Denison; Henry Edward, schooner, for port not known.

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
The Farm & The Garden. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

The Farm & The Garden. WE are sorry to learn, by our exchanges, that numbers of settlers in the older colon-<*> ies are leaving for the United States. As the old saying has it, such a change is " from the pan into the fire," as by late accounts, a considerable portion of the southern and western states were suffering severely from drought —which, we suppose, has frightened these Australians from their homes. Besides, the man who expects to escape troubles by emigrating to America, will surely be disappointed. The country is by no means in a settled state, and many a bullet—to use an expressive Yankeeism— will find a bed in " living clay" ere the confiscated lands are settled upon. The rates of all the necessaries of life are very high ; heavy taxes —unknown in the olden time—have to be paid ; fevers and agues are common. Altogether, we should say the prospects of improvement by leaving Australia for the United States are of the most doubtful character. Friday f...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
THE CATTLE PLAGUE AND THE GOVERNMENT. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

THE CATTLE PLAGUE AND THE GOVERNMENT. WE have arrived at a point of self complacency at which it was perhaps desirable we should be taught by a sharp practical lesson that we are not in all respects so much better or wiser than our neighbors; and assuredly, whether such a lesson was needed or not, it has been read to us in a manner singularly distinct and emphatic. The Rinderpest has shown us that even the gradual spread of the European railway system, or the commerce by land and sea, which draws nation into unity with nation, and administers so largely to our wealth and prosperity, must not be regarded as an unmixed blessing, and that its benefits, vast as they are, do not exempt us from the obligation of pru dence and caution in their use. We were visited six months ago by a disease well known as epizootic in the east of Europe and the west of Asia—a disease which appears to have been as much investigated and experimented upon as any calamity to which man or beast is subject. Ther...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
WRECK OF THE ARGONAUT. DEEADFUL SUFFERINGS OF THE OFFICERS AND CREW. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

WRECK OF THE ARGONAUT. DREADFUL SUFFERINGS OF THE OFFICERS AND CREW. The Argonaut was a full-rigged ship, of 1078 tons. She was built at Quebec; in 1858, and was commanded by Captain M'Kenzie. She sailed from St. John's, N. B., for Greenock, on the 1st December, having on board a full cargo of timber. After she left port the weather proved very boisterous, and south-west gales   prevailed till 24th December, when the ship was about 360 miles to the westward of Tory Island, and making for the North Channel. On that day a violent hurricane burst upon the ship, accompanied by snow, sleet, rain, and hail alter nately. The ship at the time was running under close-reefed topsails. Before the sails could be taken in, every stitch of canvas set on the vessel was split and blown to tatters. The waves meanwhile were making a clean breach over the ship, and she was straining and laboring in the trough of the sea at a dreadful rate. About 7 o'clock on the evening of the 24th the th...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
CLERMONT. (From the Peak Downs Telegram, March 17.) [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

CLERMONT. (From the Peak Downs Telegram, March 17.) IT is rather remarkable that despite the almost total desertion of our diggings, the gold returns of the last week have been scarcely below the average of the past six months. This may be past may accounted for partly by diggers telling their gold prior to tearing, but chiefly, we imagine, to the fact that all the man who were not "on gold" hare left, and that those remaining are even now making a living. There is a very large amount of sickness at the Copper Mine just at present, about ten per cent of 4ho population being laid up with fever in various forms. This is the unhealthy season of the year, but impure water and spirituous liquors are unquestionably the causes of much of the prevalent ill-health. It is a subject for congratulation, however, that while few escape these fevers they are rarely attended with danger when carefully treated. Our attention has been called by more than one resident of Copperfield to the gross breac...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
ROCKHAMPTON. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

ROCKHAMPTON. BY the Florence Irving we are in receipt o files from Rockhampton to April 3. The Bulletin of that date says :— It is our painful duty to chronicle the sudden death of Mr. Edward Ashton, ayouagman twenty - fire years of age, employed in the drapery de partment of Mr. John Palmer's establishment. He had been unwell for a few days, but was not seriously ill until Sunday evening, when Dr. Callaghan was sent for. Mr. Aahton died at half-past 4 o'clock on the following morning (yesterday). The cause of death was disease of the heart. Deceased was sergeant in the Rock hampton Veluuteer Riflea, and took part in the preparations for the excursion which came off yesterday. The funeral takes place this morn ing, the procession to move from Mr. Palmer's store, at 7 o'clock. The members of the Volun teer Corps are summoned to be in attendance at half-past. Yorkey, an aboriginal, was indicted at the sittings of the ABsize Court on Saturday, on a charge of rape on the person of a Mrs...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
UPPER MARY. (From the Tiaro Correspondent of the Maryborough Chronicle.) [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

UPPER MARY. (From the Tiaro Correspondent of the Maryborough Chronicle.) Your Upper Mary correspondent thinks we must put up with deficiency of postal accommo-<*> dation for many years to come. Maryborough is a convenient distance, forsooth. I can only only suppose his part of the Upper Mary to be very low down, or he would not so calmly write of a convenient distance. I send for my letters to this convenient postal town, and this is what it costs—l7s. 6d. I could a weary account give of the uncertainty of their safe arrival. Another friend of ours wanted to know wliat became of our maize. Mr. Stedman will tell him, or some storekeeper con easily iuform him. All that I know is that fins corn has been loaded and delivered in Maryborough for 4s. per bushel. Believe me, only those who wear the shoe know where it pinches. Your remarks on immigrationare not alto gether reasonable. Here is an immense coun try to be colonised, and this can only be done by increased population...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
OUR TRIP TO THE DIGGINGS. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

OUR TRIP TO THE DIGGINGS. BY S.G.M. "JACK, don't you think we're a precious pair of fools to be slaving here to the tune of six or eight pounds a-week, when we could be earning at least double that sum at the diggings?" Jack, fixing his eyes full upon me, merely •*wl—" Yes; if we could!" and—" What t> fellow you are!" This was about fourteen years ago, in the full flush of the gold times. We were then operating in the Ec office, in Sydney, and notwithstanding the high rate of wages then paid, the men were frequently so sick at heart from the exhaustive number of hours re quired to be worked (fourteen or fifteen out of the twenty-four) that they were continually leaving the office for other employments, but more especially for the all-attractive gold* fields. "Let us," said I, " have a stroll in the Botanical Gardens, and talk over the matter! " "Agreed," said he; and away we sailed in that direction. Under the shade of a pleasant tree, in that very pleasant retreat from the dust ...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
A SAD TALE FOR CHRISTMAS. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

A SAD TALE FOR CHRISTMAS. STORIES are all the vogue now; Christmas stories, told on cream-tinted paper, with gold edges to it, and with ever so much crimson and green on the covers; stories all about prin- eetses, giants, and fairies, and showing how, in that delightful and highly desirable world of fiction, the bad people always come to grief, and the good ones " marry and lire happy ever afterwards." No misery lasts very long in them; no ugly problems are left unsolved. The lait pages, instead of being blistered with tear*, at those of life are so often, wind up with a jolly settlement of everybody and everything. Let the little ones think it is all true. Timo enough for them to find out what v rery diffe rent world they will have to deal with, and what agony, despair, and crime close the last chapters of many a story that God writes in the great book of Life which has Eternity on both sides for its covers. We hare a little story to teU to the olduters before they settle down to t...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Classified Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

Shipping. PASSAGES FROM EUROPE. BY THX BLACK BALL LINE OF CLIPPER SHIPS, Under Contract with the Queensland Government. FRIENDS AT HOME. "|>EBSONBdesirous of REMITTING FUNDS JL to FRIENDS at HOME, for the purpose of Paying their Passages to Queensland by the Black Bail Line, under the Land Order System —by which all persons over twelve yean of age, paying their own passage, will receive a Thirty- ' pound (£3O) Land Order, and Children under twelve a Fifteen-pound (£l5) Land Order—can remit the whole or part of the Passage Money through the undersigned; and should the sums remitted not bo used for the payment of Pas lages, the amount will be returned to the parties remitting in the Colonies. Tsbxb of Pabsaox Mohzy :— Steerage £15 Intermediate 20 Second Cabin ... *" 25 Saloon 45 and £50 Apply to BRIGHT BROTHERS & Co.; or J. * G. HARRIS. fflO AGENTS AND CONSIGNEES. WHARF and STORE ACCOMMODATION, «t DOWSE and CO.'S, Victoria Wharf, North Brisbane, adjoining the New Immigratio...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
The Novelist MORLEY ASHTON. CHAPTER XXV. THE SUSPICIOUS SAIL. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

The Novelist MORLEY ASHTON. CHAPTER XXV. THE SUSPICIOUS SAIL. BY CAPTAIN JAMES GRANT. THOUGH, to the impatient landsman, life on board ship becomes soon monotonous, to be once again at sea was soothing to Morley Ashton. He was not without imagination, and something of the poetic in his temperament; thus, when contemplating the ocean, he felt how much there is of the grand and sublime, the terrible and beautiful, the free and fetterless in it; and, hence, perhaps, the great popularity of most tales, novels, and romances which refer to that acqueous element. Morley seemed to become a new man. With all his disappointments, he was too young not to feel the fresh impulses of youth Btrong within him; and thus hope seemed to come with the keen breeze that blew over the starlit sea, as he and Morrison trod the deck, keeping together the middle watch, which extends from midnight till four in the morning. " There, is," says one of the liveliest of our English writers, " a great feeling of fre...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
VICTORIA. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

VICTORIA. The following extracts with reference to the Leichhardt Search Fund have been handed to the Argus by Dr. Mueller:— Extract of letter from Mr. Secretary Cardwell to Governor Sir Charles Darling, K.C.B. " January 26. " I have now received the Queen's command to say to you that the time has arrived when her sympathy may be shown for an undertaking in which the Australian colonies have evinced so warm an interest. Her Majesty is pleased to aignify, through you, her gracious intention of contributing £100 to the fund which is being collected for the purpose in Victoria," On the proposition of Bir Roderick Mur chison, Bart., and Lord Strangford, supported by Mr. Hamilton, who was president of the Royal Geographical Society when its gold medal was awarded to Dr. Leichhardt, the sum of £200 was voted unanimously as a subsidy to tho Leichhardt Search Fund." The Ballaarat correspondent of the Mel bourne Argus gives the following account of the execution of Jones, convicted of the mu...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
TOOWOOMBA, AS SEEN BY A STRANGER. NO. I. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

TOOWOOMBA, AS SEEN BY A STRANGER. NO. I. TOOWOOMBA in dry, dusty weather, and Too-<*> woomba during the prevalence of comfortably moist or showery weather are, to a stranger, two very different places. The former is a huge cloud of reddish-brown d ust. The houses, trees, gardens, stores, and even the very people and cattle seem composed of the same floating sub stance—a fine dust, more like Scotch snuff than anything else of my acquaintance. The Too woomba article, however, has a quality denied to every other dust I had previously seen. Being of a greasy nature (from the splendid cattle passing over it, perhaps), once on your skin or clothes there it sticks; the more wash ing (by the way, there's a dearth of soap on the Downs) or brushing it gets the deeper it goes in. The result is obvious : Should you meet a party who came up the range with you on the previous day, and whom you parted with of fair aspect, covered, as he then was, with the fine grey dust of the latter...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Miscellaneous Items. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

Miscellaneous Items. SOUTHWARE PARK.—The purchase of the land for what is called Southwark Park, Ber-<*> mondsey, has been completed; the money paid amounted to about £911 per acre. M. QuATßirAess has presented to the French Academy a curious memoir on the origin of the race of dog*. In China, he states, the exact period of the introduction of the dog is well known. It was in the year B.C. 1122; that is, about 3000 years ago, or about the period of the siege of Troy. The dog appears, from what the writer asserts, to be a domesticated jackal, and the jackal a savage dog. Thb following are the twenty-seven names of the young Prince of Portugal, for whom Na poleon lately stood godfather:—Dom Alphonse- Heiiriquez-Maria-Luis-Pedro-d* Alcantara-Carlos Humbert - Amede - Fernando -Antonio- Miguel- Bafael - Gabriel • Gonzagues • Xavier •Francuco d'Assizes-Augusto-Jullo, Ignacio de Braganee y Saroya y Borbon y Saxe-Cobourg Gotha, Doc d'Oporto. Holyhbad Habbob or Bbttgb.—This har...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Odds and Ends. TO A YOUNG LADY. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

Odds and Ends. TO A YOUNG LADY. RICHARD SAVAGE. POLLY! from me though now a lovesick youth, Nay, though a poet, hear the voice of truth. Polly! you're not a beauty, yet you're pretty; So grave, yet gay; to silly, yet so witty: A heart of softness, yet a tongue of satire : You've cruelty, yet, ev'n with that good nature: Aow you are free, and vow reserved awhile Now a forced frown betray* a willing smile ' Beproached fjr absence, jot your sight denied; My tongue you silence, yet my silence chide. How would you piaise me should your ki defame f Yet should tbey praise, jrrow Jealoui, and exclaim If I despair, with some kind look you blest • But if I hope, at ouoe all lioj* au|>preM. You scorn, yet should my passion change or fail, Too late you'd wbiiii|>er out a «>rter tale. You love yet from your lover's wish retire • Doubt yet diaceru; deny aud yet derire. Buch, Polly! are your sex— part truth, put notion • Souio tliougbt, much whim, and aU a oontradietionl How* do people lo...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
TOOWOOMBA. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) April 4. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 7 April 1866

TOOWOOMBA. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) April 4. SINCE my last we have been favored with a good steady rain, and the appearance of the atmosphere gives promise or more; the low state of our wells, waterholes and creeks show that some five or six days of continuous rain would be a most acceptable visitation; the shallow soils are still looking excessively bare and parched, and there is little hope of any perme nent recovery for some time now the winter season U setting i n; feed, therefore, will bo generally scarce, and our farmers will realise good prices for their stocks of corn and hay. Ploughing U progressing Terr rapidly. New fields are springing into cultivation in every direction, and our anticipations of the breadth of land that will be under crop next season will be far under the mark. Sleepy proprietors have been roused into activity by the successes of their neighbors during the past season, and those neglected enclosures which have disfi gured many parts of our neighborh...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
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