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Title: Seymour Express And Goulburn Valle... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,508 items from Seymour Express And Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook And Yea Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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ARGENTINA'S WHEAT INDUSTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

ARGENTINA'S WHEAT INDUSTRY. Argentina, in spite of pour marketing facilities and a backward farming po pulation, already ranks third among the 'three wheat-exporting countries of the world. Its area devoted to wheat cul ture has doubled during the past 10 years, and is three times as large as it was only 15 years ago. There is every prospect, too, of a still greater advance in the near future. In the August United Empire, Mr. S. Rodred, o0 Buenos-Ayrec, gives an interesting ac count of cereal-growing in this South American republio, wlchl bids fair to become one of the world's granaries. Owing to conditions - of climate and soil, Argentina cannot, it would seem, enter into serious competition with Canada in the production of "strong wheat. Barletta wheat, originally brought from Italy, forms about 70 1ier cent. of the crop, and Russian wheat 20 per cent., while the remaining 10 oer cent, would include various classes of wheat, some of which are grown plie cially for- making macaroni...

BURRLESS TREFOIL. A PLANT OF GREAT VALUE TO GRAZIERS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

BURRLESS TREFOIL. A PLANT OF GREAT VALUE TO GRAZIERS. Two species of plant known in oummon English as Medicks, or more scientific ally, as belonging to tile genus Medic ago, should appeal to Australian gra ziers (say-s an article in "Dalgety's Re view.") The name of the plant is said to be. derived from the word "Me dike," the name given by the Grecian scientist Diocorides to a grass obtained by him. from Media. The term, how ever,- ounveys but little to the average Australiln;. but when he is informed that lucerne is one of its species-that plant being known botanically, as lledi cago sativat-that trifolium, or clover, is another, and that there are' about forty- other useful fodder plants bear inug the same generic title, he will at once grant that the world of agricul ture owes a very large debt indeed to the genus Medicago. None of these forty cdd speoies are Australian natives, but a number of them have been intro diceed-either purposely or fortuitously -into the continent, whe...

JOHNSON'S WATERLOO. (Being a reprint from the American "Jeweller," and taken from a booklet published by the "Sheldon Schools of Chicago.") [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

JOHNSON'S WATERLOO. (Being a reprint from' the American "Jeweller," and taken from a booklet "published by the "Sheldon Schools of Chicago.") There's a lot of talk about sucoess in life printed nowadays; some of it is pretty -good, and I suppose it does much good; a lot of you fellows need considerable trimming, anyway. But, to my mind, they don't any of them reach down to the root of the matter like my first lesson did. You fellows talk about the scarcity of good men; tell how you are driven to secure fore men that 'know more than the men they've got to boss; how scarce super intendents are; how. good salesmen are worth their weight in gold, and all that sort .of thing. I suppose it en oourages'some who are already on the right path, so that they'll keep on im -proving themselves a little; but it doesn't go to the root of the matter. It doesn't start a crop of lively young sters who will all. be fit to take the places of us fellows with white hair or with no hair, like me. 'Now, I ...

PIGS IN PASTURE AND SOILING. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

-PIGS IN PASTURE AND SOILING. A pig farmer resolved to keep his pigs in the most approved and econ omical way will provide green food early in the year. Some highly rated pasture plants are not available before warm weather, although they may then be the chief resource for grazing; there fore earlier substitutes should bie pro. vided. It is well to allot the land and provide it the season before it- is wanted. Couoh grass and lucerne are naturally among the best for early pasture. Lucerne is ready for feed ing early and late, if one has land near the homestead suitable for it. Rye corn (sown early in the autumn) makes excellent feed for pigs and all other stock in the early spring. -- For a quick growing crop sown in the spring, rape will generally be accorded first pliose, as pigs may be turned into it wlien it is a foot high,- which will 'be within a few weeks from sowing. A mixed crop may be used to good ad vantage for early pasture, viz., a sow ing of equal parts of wheat, oats ...

EFFECT OF DRAINING ON THE SOIL. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

EFFECT OF DRAINING-ON THE SOIL. Tle llo st important result is that it sakes the soil warmer. A wet soil is cold, chielly because the water in it is constantly evaporating, and evaporation is a cooling process. To illustrate this: If the bulb of one thermometer is aivered with a wet muslin, and the bulb of another similar thtrmometer is left uncovered, the wet thermometer may register as much as 15 degrees cooler when both are swung in dry air. This is duo to the cooling effect of the uraporation of the water. Moreover, water is a poor conductor of heat; wet soils warm in the sun slowly, because the water they contai holds down the temperature. There is nuually a dif ference of 5 to 10 degrees between drain ed and undrained soil in the same field In fact, the temperature of a sol in sumnmer is very largely determined by the amount of water it contains; the wetter it is, the colder it is. Warmth is one of the chief essentials.for the ger mination and growth of farm crops; it is the c...

MANURING GRASS LANDS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

MANURING GRASS LANDS. A crop of 1~ tons of meadow hay per acre contains on the average 491b nitro gen, Glib. potash, and 121lb phosphoric acid. The question of appropriate manuring of grass lands is complicated by the questions as to whether it is intended for permanent pasture, or to be cut for hay; and whether grass and clover is to predominate. LU may be .tated generally that the proportion for clover is increased by the applicat',,h ,f manures containing potash and I h-s phoric acid, and dlmmushed by the ap plication of nitrogenous manures. Too heavy mtanuring of any kind, especially nitrogenous, tends to -the growth of coarse grass. Manures oontait,..ig lime such as plaster, also promote lie growth of clovers. For grass the best results were obtained by Laws and Gil bert in England by the application of minleral (superphosphate and kainit), together rith sulphate of ammonia. Heavy grass crops were obtained, to the almost total exclusion of clover. To promote the growth of clove...

THE ONE TO BLAME. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

- THIE ON1 E TO BLAMIE. The story is told yE a .well-known -field tenor, who, when asked to sing at a dinner, although he.had no music with him, went on to the platform to try. He did his best;, but he broke down in in the middle and retired. He was cheered lp by an elderly man e?tting next to him. who tapped him on the shoulder and said: "Never 'mind, lad, tha's done thy best; but th' faller, as asked thee to sing qwt to be shot."

TO ALLAY SUSPICION. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

TO ALLAY SUSPICLON.. Diner: "Why don't you drive your cat off the table?" Waiter: "Well, yoej see, sir,- it's like this, it's stewed rabblit to-day, and the guv'nor says'the customers like to have the cat in hevidence on these days."

CITY MEN ON THE LAND. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

CITY .MEN ON THE LAND. "'Hope springs eternal in the human broast: " Man never-is, but always to be blest." ''hese Words of the poet, Alexander Pope, come to my mind whenever J see a country family moving to town or a .city family coining to the coun try (writes Farmer Biggl6. Such mig rations are. taking place with inoreas ing frequencv in every community, tand in few instances .is either- party fitted for the ralical change in envir onmeut.. Knowing morer about the trials, hopes and failures'of city peo ple in the country than of the strug phase of this great problem of discoi. shall confine myself mainly to that gles of oountry people in the city, I tent, though there is much that ma; be said on both sides. We see on every hand city-bred men who have heard the enticing call of tile open, struggling, sometimes hopefully but more often despairingly, awith hard problems for the solving of Ilhich they have had no preparatten, and aol hearts go out to them, even theougi, their efforts...

HOMELY HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

HOMELY HINTS. joined the new Don't Worry, Glub, And now I hold my breath m so scared for fear I'll, worry, That I'm worried 'most to death l The kind of elastio currency that is eeded is one that will stretch far nough to make both ends meet. Always keep a cover-on things that re boiling, because then. the steam u.'t- all escape and the things will ok much faster. A little grated cheese beaten through he mashed potatoes-the way they ook them sometimes in Italy-makes pleasant change. Write your name on the inside cover your books, instead of on the ly af, which may be-easily torn ut, then aned -boooks will usually find their ay home. If you have a dark cellar, paint the west' step white, thereby- preventing ishaps, and also doing away with eling for the last step when you go own. " Stocking tops are excellent for lin ng the a?ats, knees and elbows of small _a?s ciothe3. Being elastic, they ad J st themselves smoothly, and are ,rong without being heavy. A small but exoellent emergency...

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. Tables of IMeasures and Weights. Housekeepers will find this table useful if pasted over their baking table: -,4 altspoonfuls equal 1 teaspoonful, 3 tea sipoonfls equals 1 tablespoonful, 4 table spoonfuls equals half cup, 2 gills equals 1 cup; 2 cups equals 1 pint, 2 pints equas i quart, , quarts cqual 1 gallon, 4 cups flour equals'l pound, .f ncps 4ugar equals 1 pound, 3 cups meal equals 1 pound, 1 cup solid butter equals I pound,.. 1 heaping teaspoonful sugar equals i ounce, 1 tablespoonful liquid equals - ounoo. To Get up Collars and Cuffs.-Starch theiarticles in cold starch made by mix ing two tablespoonfuls of starch with one pint of cold water. Just before ironing rub on each article a.little soap (whito curd, 2d per tablet); then with a olean white damp rag rub lightly on right side with -a little. prepared French chalk. A pennyworth will, last for a long time. The iron will glide along 0nd will give a beatitiful gloss. How to Keep Lemons.-Lemons may he kent ...

NOTES ON NATURE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

NOTES ON NATURE. (Written for the "Farmers' Gaette," by "Naturalist:") There died recently at Cook Park, Orange, N.S.W, an emu. The death of the noble bird was a novelty only to the bird itself, and calls for no fur ther comment; but on a post-mortem examination the stomach revealed a depository as interesting as a curiosity shop. Here were found four pennies, six half-pennies, nine 2- inch wiro'nails, one 'umbrella ferrule, one key, one medal, one clock wheel 2' inches in dia meter, two collar studs, one safety pin, live marbles, three moat buttons, twenty-four pieces of glass, and one pin, two, inches in length. The latter was embedded in the bird's liver, and to this was attributed the deceased's final departure. One naturally won the fact that.the bird was not without fact that the bird was not without visible means of support. There.was still left seven penlce in hard cash, while there seems to have been intelli gence enough also to liluit the food supply to articles of not mor...

MELBOURNE LETTER [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

MELBOURE LETTER (From Our Special Corresplonuent). -lihero is a hugo schemiie for the beautilication of a long stretch of thi banks of tile Yarra. tI involves tlh expenditure of an immense sInI, but that is regarded light-heartedly by the many pgople whose Alpha and OIne', is the building up of the city, regatrd. less of the vital need for tie develupi. ment of the country. In coniectionl with this precious scheme for providiio, miles of delightful drives and gar(ldei for the delectation of city people, whil. those who are doing the real work ot building up the prosperity of the Stalt are grievously handicapped thlroigi want of pa.ssable roads, the Pulblii Works Departmeint has madile ain im. portant discovery. It has licn foiml tlhat the Ministry, under a very old title, canl compullr::ruly atlluire thl lands that are needed. The laui along the river, extending fronm hisalf mile to two miles on either side, is held by the s wnors qn such tils tihat they can be called upon to place ...

A FALSE START. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

A:FALSE STAR.T. It was round No. 17. The two pugil ists lookcd like drowned rats The referee held uij his hand. 'Them, last two rounds don't count!" he announced hoarsely. "The light will have to start all over again!" A low growl ran through the assim bly . "Wot's the trouble?"i roared a fiery faced individual' in the teuthl row. "The trouble is;" explained the ref; eree, "that the moving pioture' man has struck a bad spot in his film, and the-pictures are no good. Ar:e you ready-up there, professor? All right! Shake hands, boysl" Girl: "Are you the man who jumped from the wreck and was washed ashore last night?" ' Tramp: "No, miss; I never was washed ashore in my -life norafloat, .either, for the 'matter of that."

NECESSITY OF GRIT. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

NECESSITY OF GRIT. One of thlo secLtet of successful pool try-keeping is to feed the birds so that they obtain all the nourishment possible fromn their food, and this is itccoluplisll. ed by giving t~heim a:nplo supply of g..t, which is really hard and sharp rind crushed, (or broken ) flint or 'quirta answers both requirements more sitis factorily than any other material, as it lasts longer and does its work o:re tlhoroughly than any other. A supply of grit should be-kept in a trough in the run for the birds to L.'p tllnlselves to, and once a week a tca spolonful for each blird can he added to the soft food. Th'lis usually prevents the possibility of intlernaml stoppage, but any slight dcrangement in this dircotion should he treated by giving each hen a teaslpoonful of warmed castor oil two hours afterwards, awl the llo male hi'ds shoiuhl have ratherlTiore than there quantities. The bottlo containing the oil should be placed in a basin of hot water after removing the cork, so that t...

A COMEDY O FERRORS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

A COMEDY 0 FERRORS. A reemiarkable story comes -from Sey mour Gardens, Ilford. A gentleman and his wife occupying a villa decided to leave home for two- or three days, and asked a neighbour to "keep au eyoe" on the place. The vigihint neighbour, aoting upon his instruc tions, the same night observed a light in a bedroom of tile presumably unoc cupied house, and saw the light extin guished. Accompanied by a police man, the neighbour made a forcible entrance through the scullery window, and quietly the two men made their way to the bedroom. The light of the constable's bull's-eye disclosed tho ]lead of a man in bed, and the conl stable promptly droe.w lhls truncheon. As promptly the occupant of the bed sprang out and a despErate struggle began. Simultaneously a lady dashed across the room shrieking, threw open the window, clambered out, and in her night attiro began at considerable peril to work her way around the bay. A' seceond constable, passing at the mo ment, hastily concluded th...

WOMEN'S INTERESTS [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

WOMEN'S INTERESTS (By "Ambrosino.") "Those in the know" :iro - deep in discussing ilhe iiippincss (if theo new ideals, also woiderlng how the averago woman will dallpt herself to them. It is perhii'i pthe "large" woman who deseirvies ino sympatly-th-- woman wri!ii too imulll hip. That person wiid have tio hr's'El-isfie'd withi 1-ishion in its simplest fuorli, .id must refrain from eoen thinking of garments adaptable to i"r i-ore slenuider relatives and friends At present thle main .object seems to be 'the ilattabiLnr'nt of as large a waist mecasurement-as possible, and the womanl wlio ca-n trilnmphantly ainnounce that her past-normal '26-in. waist has de-veloped into 33 in. may feel she is indeed in tihe fronl rank of fashion. SIt is fortunate that this sudden change of outline should como just at tilie timle wlic: everyone is about to re plenish her wvardrobe. This widening of our waists, rlleiugh on '.he tapis for some considerable time, lihas now actu ally arrivedi Tlhe need for ...

NOT HIS CUE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

NOT iliS CUE. 'Tlhe tiwo lailies had hrn to the opera at a local theatre, and, going homre in ,. train, they-discusscd the' eveniing's amulllselment. "I1 think 'Lolcengrin' is just splen did'" murmured tho lady, in the large hat, as she handed iho conductor a peinv for her fare. "Do you P? asked her friend in thei :te velvet, with is superior sm;lc. "I think it's not had; but 1 just love Carlnen.' i 'The conductor blushed all over his plain features. SSoirry, niuss, lie murnuired ipolo getically, "I'm married.- ..You ight try the driver, though; ho's a single man i" Fred : "There seems to be a: lot more fuss made of Miss A's singing than iiMiss K's, and I amn sure Miss K has by far the richer voice." Jack: "Ah, yes, but Miss A has by, far the richer father." Matrimonial Ageit: "Yes. sir, I think we can suit you ,perfectly. Ah -our preliminary fee is five guineas." The Client: "Five'guineas? My dear laddie don't be farcical. Why ever should I want ,to marry' if L possessed all that m...

ORCHARD AND GARDEN NOTES. (E. E. Pescott, F.L.S., Principal, School of Horticulture, Burnley.) [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

ORCIHAdD-AND GARDEN NOTES. (E. IE. .'cscutt, F.L.S.,1kiPrinipal, Scihtool of liortioulturc,' Burnley.) THE ORIIHARD uddilig. -Young trees, or old trees that ?havo been previously cut down in prepa'rationi for budding, may be worked Iovr iow;ards tito end of the month. It is advisable to select dull, cool weather for this operation, so that the sap lmay run more freely, and that the weather will not have too drying an ellect, oi the bud. The operatiiat of budding is :i very simple one, and easily per -f'r'micd' n To gain ia successful end, the saup should ble flowing freely, consc quently when the cuts nro made, "the bark should "lift," or "run," easily. an witlhout any clinging or tearing of theO filbrs, ald it should separate freely from i'the wood. 'The buds selected should bo firsm and well matuured, and should show no signs of prematuco doe e y whatever. They, ate cut from the scions with a shallow cut, and if any wood in the cutting lie left in, this slhoultl be taken out of th...

INDIAN COSTUMES. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 April 1914

iNDiAN COSTUMES. A leading modiste in New York Is relying upon old American Indian gar ments for her inspirations. SheI makes tan-skinned coats that are embroidered with Indian motifs. A blanket em broidered in the same way composes an evening wrap. Even the beaded head bands of the tribes are pressed into the service, and are not at all un becoming I The oostumes of the squaws, too, are closely copied. The squaw knew a good deal about colour. The manner in which the 'girls and children wear their blankets is being adopted for fashionable white chiffon dance frocks, and these are worn with turquoises as ornaments, and girdles with Indian mo tifs embroidered therouppn:. The chief's coat and turban, the lea ther thongs so much seen oni Indian garments, the squaw's dress, the Black foot's skin shirt, and the Indian sym bols for the "Morning Star," the "Black Night," "The Itain," " The Frog," and "The Dragon-lly," all these' are being adopted for modern use by the dressmakers not only o...

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