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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

- r ""Q3ypflPtfj lWP1lfH &yqN&W'vtil'lVty 'I" y J'JPg ' HWHIiMH) p ''-nnnr r- - 30 The Indian Advocate. THE SEMINOLES. WWNSrf AT HOME. WHEN one sees the great moral strength of the Semi noles, notes the wonderful physical endurance of which-they are capable, observes the fearless, haughty courage they display, he cannot but be surprised that the Florida wars were not more disastrous than they were, or that any of the Seminoles ever yielded to removal. To test their endurance the old chiefs have been known to take a live coal from the camp-fire, placeut on the wrist and without an emo tion let it burn until the heat was exhausted. Tustenuggee would remove the cool ember and quietly reach down and ,put a fresh one in its place. This old chief, so famous in his tory, never yielded to removal and lived till a few years ago with his tribe in the everglades. The goal of the Seminole is to learn to endure and to achieve. To this end is every Semi nole boy educated, and different mo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

ftftT-i' aw"'"ffyw yiwww-?? y:n wwy: wy rny 'ja ym y The Indian Advocate. . ji Christmas "ail same white man's Kismas" is their-reply when questioned concerning the celebration. This is the great feast of the "Green Corn Dance" and occurs each year about the first of July, which is the beginning of the Indian's New Year. At the annual meeting the whole band assembles for the feast. The ceremony is largely under the control of the medicine men who are important personages among all the bands, and" act as advisers, as priests and as doctors. The medicine men select from the youths their successors and train them for the position they must occupy at their death. The feast, over which they preside, is the fitting time' for rejoicing, sorrowing and purifying. The ceremony preceding the dance permits all men who have violated the laws to be reinstated by un dergoing certain trying ordeals. The transgressors appear a short time before the dance. They are placed in a closed skin tent, where...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

r5S "fWfT -TBrrTV-V 32 The Indian Advocate. has overtaken the tribe, mournful strains, expressive of pity and supplication are invoked. This custom was borrowed from the Natchez Indians who worship the sun. The med icine men arrange the date for the Green Corn Dance, which is governed by a certain phase of the moon, and runners are sent from band to band to announce the time. At this great re-union old friendships are revived, court- ships take a prominent part and plans are formulated for hunting expeditions, syrup boilings and "Koonti gatherings." .-Members of one settlement will agree to meet certain mem bers, of another family; at a certain point and on a fixed day of the moon. There will be no broken pledges no disap pointments. The Seminole promises nothing to his people that he will not .fulfill. . . An exciting feature of the dance is the racing for a wife. A level course is laid off and the race begins. The dusky lover.. selects the maiden for whom he would strive, because ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

The Indian Advocate. 33 the whites. Occasionally the white man may be deceived when the Indian intents no wrong. As the National Edito rial excursion made a tour of Florida last winter, the train made a stop at a little trading post on the east coast. Quite a joke was innocently played upon the party by Captain Tom Tiger. A few Indians had come into the village to trade at the stores. Captain Tom had brought with him a load of sour oranges which grow wild in the region of his camp. The or anges are beautiful to the eye, but oh, how bitter! The merry editors saw the golden fruit and immediately offered to pur chase. The chief was glad to sell, and only asked one cent apiece for the ftuit, but the editors would not take advantage of the Indian's ignorance of the price of oranges, so they paid him twenty-five cents per dozen for them. At this the load of oranges was soon disposed of and the chief, with perfect hon esty of intention in the transaction, was the proud possessor of about t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

fwWimpFf "jflUfjpuwJwygywtwi' w? wisMfli'ww rj 'F 34 The Indian Advocate. the fruits of the chase are their main support, they cultivate fields, raising vegetables, corn and sugar cane. The men make canoes which they sell to hunters and trappers. Moc casins, baskets and Koonti starch, plumes, smoked skins and venison are among their exports. Complaints are sometimes heard that the Indians are killing off the deer and the alliga tors, which is very true; but alike are the white man and the negroes engaged in the same oocupation. Before the white race taught the Indian the monetary value of the game of the country, he slew them only for food and clothing. Long cen turies had he lived on this continent, but the herds of buffalo were not lessened; nor the vast quantities of game driven to the fastnesses of the forest. Till the white trader came to hunt the game as a source of revenue or for ruthless sport, the Indian knew no such motive. Like his forefathers the Seminole is no prohibiti...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

Thi: Indian Advocate. 35 etc. These products always find ready sale; and when the great day of shopping begins a. "corner" in red calico and fancy colored beads is the result. The squaws have control of their own money, when on a purchasing expedition, a fact which makes them very American. The squaws are about as social as the half wild deer that are petted by the guests of a hotel. As seen in their camps, clustered together, half alarmed, half curious, the side glances from their dark brown eyes seem to utter a protest against the government's eternal "move on." A more severely pure minded people are not to be found on the globe. The wo men are above reproach. Were a white man to insult a Semi nole woman by word or look it should be well for that man to never appear in the presence of the tribe again. The Semi nole girl who would unwisely bestow her affections would be killed outright by the squaws. In the history of these In dians only one such case is known, and at the birth of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

"""4 ffW"H'lgW.'lft yy "-yW yrTy-"'pr4rv"Jn'lC'" tt 36 The Indian Advocate. K'-. dians as well by the slaves themselves; as was evidenced last winter, when a tourist meeting Tustenuggee's slave (who was watching the canoe, while the master sold some skins) at tempted to ask some questions and at the same time to en lighten the Negro on his true condition. As the chief came back to the canoe the philanthropic stranger began to explain his mission. The chief, with the ferocity which at once stamped him as a true Tustenuggee, ordered the Negro to "go," which command was instantly obeyed. Then turning to the stranger he said, ' 'white man's slave free Injun este lusta (Negro) belong to Injun now you go. The philanthro pist also quickly obeyed. The number of Negroes among the tribe at the present time is small. They are allied to the Indians, and while they are expected to obey, they are treated kindly, more as com panions than as slaves. (Continued). X X WANT. Want is a bitter and a hat...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

T'4giyMB"Mnrii''y',w' yty 'fw Pljvwi nwwwviwy it'" 'm wyJqyp1 The Indian Advocate. . 36 OUTLINE OF 8&ANI&EL-ZUNI HISTORY. , JIY THANK HAMILTON CUSHINO. DURING the earlier years of my life with theZuni Indians of Western-Central New Mexico, from the autumn of 1879 to the winter of 1881 before access to their coun try had been rendered easy by the completion of Atlantic and Pacific railroad they remained, as regards their social and religious institutions and customs and their modes of thought, if not daily life, the most archaic of the Pueblo and Indian peoples. They will continue to be, as they have for centuries been, the most highly developed, yet characteristic and rep resentative of all these people. In fact, it is principally due to this higher development by the Zuni, than by any of the other Pueblos, of the mytho-sociologic system distinctive in some measure of them all at the time of the Spanish conquest of the southwest, that they have maintained so long and so much...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

ivmiiammm tpwmmrjmmiwyi twpwnjrm ftmimmmmmmmmmmmmmm 37 The Indian Advocate. priests of the house" in the central town itself, much as were the divisions and cities of the great Inca dominion in South America represented and ruled from Cuzo, the central city and province of them all. It thus happened that, although one or another of the Zuni sub-tribes was at different times partially and tempora rily conquered by the Spaniards, they were never as a whole people subdued; and, although missions and chapels were ulti mately established at one and another of their towns by Fran ciscan friars, they were never all of them immediately under mission influence and surveillance at any one time until a comparatively recent date. The evidences and tragic conse quences of this may be traced throughout the history of Span ish intercourse, and as the measure of its effect in minimizing the influence of Spanish thought and example on Zuni cult ure and habits is of great importance in determining to...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

The Indian Advocate. 38 little army occupied as headquarters, for several months, the , town they had captured, and later the more numerous rear of J the army were quartered at the more central and eastern town 6f of Muzaque. During this time Coronado and his comrades , n arms were able to reassure and pacify the natives, inso much that when, two years afterward, they were returning ' through Zuniland enroute to Mexico from the conquests of JjP lj the farther Pueblos and their vain search for the golden prov- ( v " ince of Quivira, they were entreated to remain and join the S i tribes. But Fra Juan de Padilla, the heroic priest of the ex- J pedition, hac found more fertile fields to the eastward, and risSPif ' onty three or four Mexican Indian allies of the Spaniards 0& were fain to stay. When, in 1581-82, Francisco Chamuscado and his nine soldiers recklessly penetrated those vast and lonely wilds of ' the southwest and passed through the country of Cibola, he was not hindered b...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

w '""wyT 39 , Tfte Indian Advocate. "' ... ' ing Ka-Kakwe, or mythic-dance dramatists, personating gods and heroes of the olden time are received twice yearly (before and after the harvest growth and time), so were these soldiers and friars received, not as enemies, nor as aliens, but as ver itable gods or god-men, coming forth at the close of autumn from out the land of day, whence come the ripening breaths of the frost gods. As yet, the Franciscan friars, although sometimes bap tizing scores of the Zuni much to their gratification, doubt less, as quite appropriate behavior on the part of such beings when friendly, had not antagonized their ancient observan ces or beliefs; and the warriors who accompanied them had never, since the first of them had come, and after fighting had laid down their dreadful arms and made peace and left hosta ges, albeit mortals like themselves, with their forefathers had never again raised their fearful batons of thunder and fire or their long blades of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

StWfl-JV'l! nfmZ'j fflRByfr u ,? "" -n j . The Indian Advocate. 40 3 sory attendance at mass and other observances and the con stant interferences of the father and his soldiers (for a small escort, unluckily, accompanied him) with their own acts of worship. When in the winter of 1630 Fra Martin de Arvide joined Fra Letrado at Hawik'uh, on the way to establish mis sions among the Zipias, a Pueblo people said by the Zunis to have lived considerably to the southwestward of them at that time, and called by them Tsipiakwe ("people-of-the-coarse-hanging-hair"), he foresaw for his brother and himself speedy martyrdom. He had but fairly departed when, on the Sun day following, the people delayed attending mass, and Fra Francisco, going forth to remonstrate with them, met a party of the native religionists armed with bows and arrows and in mood so menacing that in expectancy of death he knelt where he had stood, clinging to his crucifix, and, continuing to en treat them, was transfixed by m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

41 The Indian Advocate. "K,-" W ' fe THE HYPOCRITE. He was a man Who stole the livery of the court of heaven, To serve the devil in; in virtue's guise, Devoured the widow's house, and orphan's bread In holy phrase, transacted villainies, That common sinners durst not meddle with. At sacred feast, he sat among the saints, And with his guilty hands touched holiest things; And none of sin lamented more; or sighed More deeply, or with graver countenance, Or longer prayer, wept o'er the dying man, Whose infant children, at the moment, he Planned how to rob. In sermon style he bought And sold, and lied; and salutation made, In scripture terms. He prayed, by quantity' And with his repetitions, long and loud, All knees were weary. With one hand he put A penny in the urn of poverty, And with the other took a shilling out. On charitable lists those trumps, which told -The public ear, who had, in secret, done The poor a benefit, and half the alms They told of, took themselves to keep them soun...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

w ynvnym!mJW4)J9tf!m'Vl "'r,' J-i V- ..'. ux.v4..j) 2 ijuakfrm" ''i kiiibh The Indian Advocate. 42 To sanctimonious seeming; but meanwhile, The shame within, now visible to all, His purpose balk'd. The righteous smil'd, and even Despair itself, some signs of laughter gave, As, ineffectually, he strove to wipe His brow, that inward guiltiness defiled. . Detected wretch! of all the reprobate, None seem'd more mature for the flames of hell Where still his face, from ancient custom, wears A holy air, which says to all that pass Him by, "He was a hypocrite on earth." Pollock. " U v v HE DIDN'T WANT THEM. Wwwswv RECENTLY an old man entered a store in Little Rock, Ar kansas, and taking from his pocket an old buckskin pouch, he emptied two coins on the counter, and then, after regarding the silver for a few moments said: "Mister, I want to buy some goods to make a dress." "That money is mutilated, old gentleman. This twenty five cent piece has notches filed in it, and the fifty-cent piece h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

43 The Indian Advocate. rnj fr .a little boy, I strung this quarter around his neck. One day his watch got out of order, he said, and he filed these notches in it. He and his sister, Mary that was the girl's name used to play in the yard, and compare their watches to see if they were right. Sometimes John wouldn't like it because Mary's watch was bigger than his, but she would explain that she was bigger than him, and ought to have a bigger watch. The children grew up; but, as they always lived in the woods, they were not ashamed to wear their watches. When a young man came to see Mary once, she forgetfully looked at her fifty cents. 'What are you doing?' asked the young man, and when she told him she was looking at her watch, he took it as a hint and went home. After this she did not wear her watch in company. Well, Mary and the young man married, John went off in the army and got killed. Mary's husband died; and about two years ago Mary was taken sick. When her mother and I reache...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

'"ftfp " The Indian Advocate. 44 ST. SCHOLASTICA. o N February ioth, the Church celebrates the feast of a Virgin Saint, who is known principally by the one inci dent in her life which is unique in the whole history of the Saints. The Saint is Scholastica, the sister of the great St. Benedict, and this is the incident: St. Scholastica visited her holy brother once a year, and not being allowed to enter his monastery, he went out with some of his monks to meet her at a house at some small distance. On the occasion of the last visit, Scholastica was very urgent with her brother to delay his return till the next day, that they might converse on the bliss of eternal life. St. Benedict unwilling to transgress his rule, told her he could not pass a night but of his monas tery. Scholastica finding him resolved an going home, laying her hands joined upon the table and her head upon them with many tears begged of Almighty God to interpose in her be half. Hex prayer was scarcely ended, when th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

45 The Indian Advocate. ST. WAT.HURGA. She was the daughter of the Holy King Richard of Eng land, and sister of the Holy Bishops Willibald and Winebald. She was born in the kingdom of the West-Saxons in England, and educated in the monastery of Winburn in Dorsetshire, where she took the religious veil. After having passed twenty seven years in this holy house, she was sent with several others, into Germany, at the request of her cousin, St. Boni face. After two years she was appointed Abbess of a nun nery founded by her two brothers, at Heidenheim, in Suabia. After a holy life she passed to her reward on the 25th of Feb ruary, 779. She is the titular Saint of many great churches in Germany, Brabant, Flanders, France, Alsace, Lorraine and other countries. U. I. O. G. D. x x x x A KING OF BIGOTS. NAVWSaWW J 44 fESHURUN waxed fat and kicked." The Methodist ranters are just now in the position of the insolent Hebrew 'infant. Since the election they are puffins: themselves out like the f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

,wjj a, -- t - il i The Indian Advocate. ' 46 tration, in face of the fact that a leading prelate had come out publicly in approval of that policy and had caused it to be understood that the Pope had also approved of it. This atti tude of the Catholic press was remarkable not merely for its singular unanimity but for its perfectly spontaneous and un inspired character. It stood as one man for public morality and the fundamental principles of the American Constitution. Can the Methodist press make a like boast? Not a bit of it. The constitutionalism of the Catholic press was not less re markable than the unanimity of the non-Catholic press in the opposite direction. Hardly a sheet of them all, of whatever denomination, that did not endorse and encourage every step taken to crush out the liberties of a struggling people and es tablish the principles of imperialism on the ruins of the Ameri can Constitution. The audacity of the religious "walking delegate," as we may style the paid sec...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. POBLISHKD BY TUB BENEDICTINE FATHERS OF" SAOItED HEART MISSION, OKLAHOMA. A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by Rt. Rev. Thco. Mecrschaert, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territories. TERMS Ol'"' SUBSCRIPTIONS Single Copies i5c- Annual . ";$i.oo. fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each 75c. Foreign $1.25: Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. PRIVIIEGESt 1. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Every year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factors, one for...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

The Indian Advocate. 48 room of the Indian boys was ablaze from thence the fire gained the novitiate and the chapel then it spread slowly towards the monastery proper when it came to the college it spent all its fury; and the heat being intense the spire of the Church was kindled and in less than thirty minutes the whole edifice 60x114 was gone. Nearly half of the members of the community were now busy at the Convent of the Sis ters of Mercy, about sixty yards distant from the Church every body thought it could be saved, but God willed it other wise in seventeen minutes all was over and today old St. Mary's walls stand desolate and but two Sisters remain in a shanty near by, to 'keep watch over the ruins of their once happy home. Twenty-two yards from the Church is a small building, which is occupied by the Benedictine Sisters. It was repor ted that it was burnt, but providence preserved it as a relic of what was once known as Sacred Heart Mission. It is true, five small out-houses ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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