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Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 8 Advertisements Column 4 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 25 July 1846

SHERLOCK’S GENERAL EMIGRATION • OFFICE, 3D Peck Sli|), New \ork. Arrangements Jor I B>x>. The Subscriber begs leave to intorin Iris Friends mid the Public, tlmt lie bus opened mi Office as übove, in conjunction with his Old Established House in Liverpool, and hopes, from his being long and favorably known in tiie trade, to be able to give satisfaction to all parties wishing to emigrate to or from the ‘‘Old Country,” having a REGULAR LINE OF THE FINEST PACKET SHIPS, SAILING WEEKLY, viz; St. Patrick, Samuel Hicks, Hottiuguer, John it. Skiddy, Rappahannock, John Haring, Ohio, Kalamazoo, Cincinnati, Liberty, Tarliuta, Eutaw, Niagara, St. Lawrence, South Carolina, Europe, Monticello, Oronoco, Adirodack, Leopard, Isaac Allerton, Panthe, May Flower, Jas 11. Shepherd. Any persons wishing to engage passage tor their friends, may depend upon having every attention paid them in Liverpool. When parties settling for passage decline coming out, the money willbeimiuediutcly r...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 8 Advertisements Column 5 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 25 July 1846

JM’CRACKIX, LICENTIATE APOTHE- • CARY, lately from Ireland, begs to announce that he has opened a Lime Score at 100 Sea street, Boston, where the strictest personal attention will be paid to the compounding of Physicians’ Prescriptions, and l)is pensing Family Medicines. Mr. M’Cracki.n will guarantee that his medicines are all genuine, and of a very superior Quality to those dispensed at a certain establishment in the vicinity. my Tvl’C. AKNAILT, SILVERSMITH, 22 • South Russell street, respectfully informs the members of the Catholic Clergy, that he manufactures at moderate terms, every article for the Church’s use, such as Chalices, Ciiioriunis, Ostensoriuins, Holy Water Pots, Censors, Pises, Oil Boxes, Lamps. 4c, in silver or plated. All articles made according to the latest patterns, and warranted superior in solidity to any imported. Orders sent to Mr. Donahoe, or 2 2 South Russell street. ap2j Til 40 EVE AM) Ear. dr. davenport Oculist and Physician, has removed to No. 5i S Wint...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

BOSTONPILOT. PATRICK DOXAIIOE, EDITOR. BE JUST, AND FEAR NOT- LET ALL THE ENDS THOU AIM'ST AT, BE TIIY GOD'S, THY COUNTRY'S, AND TRUTH'S. f OFFICE, > X No. 1, Spring Lang. ) $2.5O::::Jn 'Aiumncc. Boston, Sotuvbon, August 1, 1S4G. llolumc 0::::No. 31.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE NUN. FROM THE GERMAN OF UHLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

THE NUN. FROM THE GERMAN OF UHLAND. DEMOCRATIC REVIEW. In the 6ilent cloister garden Walked a maiden pale and young ; Sadly shone the inoou above her, On her eye-lash sparkling hung A tear —’twas for her lover. "Yet ’twas well, my own beloved, Well that thou hast gone above— Now my heart is thine and purely, For an angel I may love. And thou art an Angel surely." Thus with weary steps she wandered, Till she reached the sacred place Where the Virgin, pure and lowly. Stood with features full of grace, In the moonlight, calm and holy. At her feet the maiden falleth, Looking upward to the skies ; In the inorniug there they found her, Closed in death her gentle eyes, And the black veil wrapped around her.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE DEAD PRIEST. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

THE DEAD PRIEST. CLARA PAYNE. "He is not dead, but sleepeth." List to the priests, they chaunt a prayer; Alas ! a brother now is dead : How solemn sounds the requiem air, Announcing thus a spirit’s fled. Within the sacred aisle they bear — Aud near the hoiy altar place— The body of the dead with care ; How placid shines in death that face ! Lo! on a bier the priest array’d In sacerdotal robes, is seen ; His hands uprais’d as tho’ he pray’d : His face celestially serene. “He is not dead !” one might exclaim, "He only sleepeth for a while !” Was Death thus welcomed when he came, By that last blissful smile! Dolman’s Magazine. * Written after witnessini the funeral of a French priest iu tile cathedral of Ueunea.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
AMUSEMENTS OF YOUNG WOMEN. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

AMUSEMENTS OF YOUNG WOMEN. Flirting, romping gigling, winking, Shopping, scolding, seldom thinking, Chaltering scandal all day long, and young* Choosing bonnets, shawls, and dresses, Reading novels, braiding tresses, Practising recrimination, Lisping out insinuation, Primming up their artful faces, Trying to borrow from the graces ; And whether meagre stout, or fat, Throwing baits for every flat.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A SPECULATOR'S WEEK. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

A SPECULATOR'S WEEK. Monday—Railway shares I sought ; Tuesday—Some thousands I possess’d Wednesday—My mansious, two I bought: Thursday—With equipages blest. Friday—ln style to court 1 sail; ) Saturday—Sees me snug in jail, > With Sunday’s leisure to bewail. )

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

THE WORLD. ’Tis a very good world to live in. To spend, or to lend, or to give in : Hut to beg, or to borrow, or to ask for your own, ’Tis the very worst world that ever was known. An Excellent Custom. In Munich Bavaria, all boys found in the streets asking alms, are taken to an asylum established for that purpose. As soon as they enter the door, and before having been cleansed, or their clothing removed, a portrait of each is taken, representing him in the same form as when found begging. When the portrait is finished, lie is cleansed and presented with anew and neat suit of clothes. After going through a reg-, ular of education, appointed by the directors of the asylum, they are put to learn a trade, at which they work until they have earned enough to liquidate all their expenses from the first day they entered the institutions. When this is completed, they are dismissed trom the institution, to gain their own livelihood. At the same time the portrait taken when they first entered...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Correspondence. NEW-YORK. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

Correspondence. NEW-YORK. July 20, 1846. To the Editor of the Boston Pilot: Dear Sir: —The following lines were hastily thrown together :they are the production of one, unused to writing, and nothing hut a sense of what every Irishman owes his country and countrymen, could have tempted me to obtrude myself on your or their notice. They are addressed to my fellow exiles and intended for their benefit, and are the enmuations of an honest though not of a cultivated mind. TO IRISHMEN. Oh l my countrymen what strange fatality besets your path? Almost from your cradle to that final resting place, the gruve, you seem fit subjects for speculation, aye and speculators whereon to exercise their rapacity. That blissful season, boyhood, which in other countries is spent in the acquirement of knowledge, and in innocent enjoyment, has been spent by you for the benefit of merciless landlords and heartless, soulless parsons. And should you in after life (a sad alternative) leave your homes, you no ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
BANGOR, [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

BANGOR, July 24, 1546. To the Editor of the Boston Pilot: Dear Sir, — It was my good fortune, a few evenings ago, to drop into the Hall which the Bangor Total Abstinence Society have erected fortheirregular monthly meetings: it also answers ns an academy for the instruction of the children of the Catholic population. This academy has existed for the last fourteen months, where those children receive a moral and religious education untainted by bigotry or prejudice; where the divine principles of our holy religion are instilled into their youthful minds, as yet untarnished by those monster vices which rob man of thut innocence which assimilates him to the very Angels of God. These divine principles also serve as shields, in a more mature age, to ward off, as it were, the onslaught that the enemies of the faith make on our holy religion; it is in such institutions that is laid the foundation of a good religious life. But, to resume what I have digressed from. The evening of the 21st u...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DIED. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

DIED. In Worcester, on the 20th inst. Mr. Joseph Urigdon, of iuflamation of the stomach, in the 69th year of his age. He was born in Middletown, Connecticut, on the 18th Nov., A. D., 1778. He was a convert to our Holy religion, and a man of mortified life and extraordinary piety. In 1799 he finished his apprenticeship in | Greenfield, Mass ; but his unsettled disposition caused him to ramble throughout the States without any seemingly fixed ' purpose: his first migration was to Norfolk; in 1800 we find him at the Eastern shore of Virginia, and two years afterwards in Baltimore. St. Mary’s County, Maryland, Georgetown, D. C., and his native state, were successively his abodes till 1830, at which time he commenced housekeeping with the Rev. Jas. Fitton. In the Nov. after, he opened a school for Catholic children; but being disappointed in his expectations, receiving only ten scholars, he went to Georgetown, in the spring of 1831, where he commenced business. Not succeeding in this, we...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TO THE IRISH INHABITANTS OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

TO THE IRISH INHABITANTS OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. J. B. McMAHON, Ptre, M.D. You have ample reason to perceive, my countrymen, how powerfully the unfortunate and lawless occurrence, which has lately taken place in Hamilton street, has saddened the feelings and cast a gloom of sorrow over the countenances of every honest and religious Irishman of this city. \ es, they deplore such an occurrence, as being a wanton and wicked outrage against the laws of God and of civil society. An act which our religious feelings of the sacred ties of humanity forbid us to palliate. And our grief on that account becomes the more intolerable,because the rioters, or the actors in these lawless scenes, call themselves Irishmen. So that the worthy and the good, on that account, must bear a part, in common estimation, with the depraved, the worthless, and the wicked. 1 regret that the term, Irishman, as a patronimic, is not better understood, because ’tis only then, it could be generally and justly appreciate...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE SOVEREIGN PONTIFF, PIUS IX. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

THE SOVEREIGN PONTIFF, PIUS IX. The following article —remarkable from the source whence it comes, still more than for the spirit which pervades it—we extract from the London Times. The plain acknowledgement of the great power and influence of the Sovereign Pontiff in this advanced age of the world, while it furnishes evidence of the go dll sense and discernment of tiie writer, gives proof that we have passed the period n hen even England will affect to deny the existence of that power and that influence which she must feel in every corner of her mighty empire. Of course there are sentiments in this article of which w e do not approve, but we must expect to find such in the pages oUthe Times: — “ There are few instances in the history of the papacy of a conclave so speedily dissolved, and an election so soon decided, as that which has just conferred the supreme honours and authority of the Roman church upon Cardinal Mattei, late Bishop j of fmola, and now Pope Pius IX. The j electio...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE LAZARISTS OF THE EAST. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

THE LAZARISTS OF THE EAST. From article by M. X. Marmier in the French Journal de Pinstruction publiyut, entitled “Fragments from a travr.lliag journal I found at Constantinople about the French embassy merchants, public officers, physicians who from the dignity of their character and their intelligence, contributed much to maintain in the minds of the inhabitants the sympathy and respect which the people of the East have always had for France. At the head of these men, whose acquaintance it has given me much pleasure to make, I must place the Lazarist fathers, those humble and tender apostles of the Gospel, who accomplish their pious mission with so much meekness, patience, and devotion. No worldly ambition conducted them to the Eastern soil, no rumors of ambition resound in their ears. They are met only where there is good to be done, they are known only by their works. Their task is to instruct and to console. Whoever needs their assistance or their instruction, can address himse...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
GREAT OPEN-AIR REPEAL MEETING IN SCOTLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

GREAT OPEN-AIR REPEAL MEETING IN SCOTLAND. On Saturday, 27th June, an important and interesting demonstration in favour of Irish independence took place on Crighton Moss, Fushie Bridge, about fifteen miles to the south of Edinburgh. The meeting consisted principally of the Irish employed on the Harwich railway line, and was convened at the request of these poor exiles, upwards of a thousand of whom are employed in that neighbourhood. Charles Glendonwyn Scott, Esq., that uncompromising friend of Ireland, wisely calculating on the satisfactory results that must attend the holding a “monster meeting,” in a district where some riots had recently occurred, lost no time, and spared neither labour nor expense in giving these hardworking men an opportunity of hearing the salutary lessons of peace and good will which the principles of Repeal involve, and which it is the duty of every follower of O’Connell to inculcate. At an early hour on Saturday morning the Repeal wardens of Edinburgh were...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
FATHER MATHEW. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

FATHER MATHEW. Mr. Schouler, of the Lowell Courier, is writing home some very pleasing letters, an extract from one of which we subjoin, in relation to the Apostle of Temperance:— We arrived in the city about seven o’clock, and, as we were to leave Cork early the next morning, we availed ourselves of a leisure hour to pay our resemblance spects to that great and good man, Father Mathew, whose home is in Cork. He lives in a back, out-of-the-w 7 ay portion of the city, up a narrow street, amidst the poor of his country, to w hom he has been the greatest of benefactors. As we stopped at the door, we saw Father Mathew in the front room in the second story. 1 knew it was him, from the strong resemblance he bears to the engravings of him tßat I have seen in America. He came down himself, and when we announced ourselves as strangers from America, he gave us a warm welcome to his humble dwelling.— We followed him up into the room,where we had first seen him. It was a small room ; a round ce...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
FIRST AMERICAN STANDARD. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

FIRST AMERICAN STANDARD. The following extract is from the London Morning Chronicle , of July 25, 1776. The analogies of the first American ensign, are ingeniously set forth; yet as our prejudicesagainst the snake&re deeply-rooted, and as old as original sin itself, few of our countrymen will regret that the device was changed. The extract, however, is a curiosity, and will be quite new to ninetenths of the present generation: “The colors of the American fleet have a snake with thirteen rattles, the fourteenth budding, described in the attitude of going to strike, with the motto: ‘Don’t tread on me!’ It is a rule in heraldry, "that the worthy properties of the animal, in the crest borne, snail be considered, and the base ones cannot be intended. The ancients accounted a snake or a serpent an emblem of wisdom, and, in certain attitudes, of endless duration. The rattlesnake is properly a representative of America, as this animal is found in no other part of the w orld. The...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
BOSTON REPEAL ASSOCIATION. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

BOSTON REPEAL ASSOCIATION. The Association held its monthly meeting in the usual place on Monday evening. The chair was taken at a few minutes past eight, by \V. J. Walsh, Esq., who stated that in consequence of the meeting being well attended at that early hour, it was thought advisable to commence business before the arrival of the President. He called on the wardens for reports, and appointed Hall Wardens. Mr. James on his arrival took the chair, and presented the meeting with the package containing Mr. Ray’s report, to the Wardens, for distribution among the members. He alluded jocularly to the address on the parcel, which he called his Irish title. Mr. O’Connell after he became Lord Mayor of Dublin, presented himself to the people in his robes of office. They were very magnificent, and added much to the dignity and politeness of his appearance. Accordingly, his first words, as he came forward, were: “Boys, do you know me?” (a laugh.) He (Mr. J.) might say the same when he would...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Correspondence. THE NEW YORK FREEMAN’S JOURNAL AND “YOUNG IRELAND.” [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

Correspondence. THE NEW YORK FREEMAN’S JOURNAL AND “YOUNG IRELAND.” VETUS HIBERNICUS. Netc York, July Qbth, 1846. Mr. Editor: The Freeman’s Journal of this date has an article on the subject of my lust communication to which with your permission I will reply, clearing and closing up my side of the question. On the threshold, however, I must complain of the side-wipe made by that paper at the Pii.ot for publishing my letter; as being one which, the Journal leaves it to be inferred, was “calculated to damage the church and mislead her members.” If such was its character, then my error was an aggravated one and the Journal had a right to blame you for its publication. But your part is this: you opened your columns to a defence—containing not a particle of matter (as I think) not purely political —against what seemed to be an unnecessarily severe attack on parties far away, in the Journal. If there is any blame to be 'imputed, I am the party on whom it should fall—though it never was my...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
QUEBEC, [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 1 August 1846

QUEBEC, July \llk, 1846. De ar Doxahok, —If among the large circle of your acquaintance, there he one who maj’ wish to escape the scorching rays of a July’s sun in Boston or elsewhere; if there he a Protestant who wishes to know the sacrifices that are made by the Catholic clergy of Canada; if there be a Catholic desirous of seeing the strict rules of the Carthusian scrupulously observed, just tell him, or any of them, to visit Quebec and Montreal. There, besides cool breezes in summer, will they find over one hundred ecclesias l tics, and over two hundred nuns, devoting their lives, and fortunes, and talents to the education of the poor, the relief of the distressed and the comfort of the sorrowing. By means of their united exertions, all the sick poor are supported in the hospital, all the indigent relieved, all the orphans provided for, and all the children educated gratuitously. In them, the poor have true friends and sincere well-wishers, and lest the English government should ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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