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Elephind.com contains 313 items from Free-Lance, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 22 July 1905

Vol. I. No. 18. Our Telephone Service. The people of Norfolk are sorely afflicted in the matter of telephone service. If there ever was a department in which system, and order, and unity, should prevail, it is the telephone business; but the very opposite exists here. In common with some other unfortunate communities, Norfolk has two telephone companies, both apparently working independently and outwardly against each other. The Southern Bell Company is a branch of the great American Bell Telephone trust, with headquarters in New York. Its tentacles reach out all over the nation, and the monthly remittances that reach Courtland street, New York city, from every town and village in the land is a stupendous sum. Untold millions of dollars, representing clear profit above all cost of operation and maintenance, flow yearly into the insatiate maw of the American Bell Telephone Co.; this is the tribute the American people pay for the privilege of talking. It is a terrible drain upon the r...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 22 July 1905

2 gently applied, could lessen the burdens of the people and stop the devastating drain upon their resources. In this respect we might take a leaf from the German method. We are all familiar with the stumbling blocks encountered by the great American trusts when they invade that very sensible country. We all know the restrictions by which they are hedged about, and how jealously the welfare of the people is safeguarded, and we know, too, how readily, and willingly the transplanted trust accepts every condition imposed upon it. and proceeds to operate like the well-behaved creature it is: hut. how it does make the foolish patriots at home pay for its proscriptions and limitations abroad! To get hack to the local concern, and to make one suggestion at a time, we would advise that our telephone companies start the matter of reform by getting out a list of subscribers that is clear and legible, and cut out the mass of advertisements which now adds to all the other confusion of their sys...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 22 July 1905

have helped to spread their great reputation, one to which The Free-Lance; gratefully adds its humble but hearty note of praise. PEARY, THE POLE AND POSSIBILITIES. “What’s the use," asks a pessimistic contemporary, “of having a polar exploration department attached to the navy? Peary has been on its pay-roll for years, and has done nothing to earn his salary." We dearly love to answer such questions as these, for there is something “highly significant" in Uncle Sam’s continued attempts on the privacy of the pole. Personally, we incline to the theory that he wants to start an international barber shop, paint it red, white and blue, and surmount it with the sign “WE SHAVE THE WORLD.” Or maybe he wants to nail an American flag at the top and give Richmond Pearson Hobson a permanent job as watchman. Then, again, as someone else has suggested, he may want to drive the pole through the earth, put the ends in slings and use the world for a grindstone; you can’t tell. Perhaps our joking unc...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 22 July 1905

4 Tfte Free fanes Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONE YEAK W 1.75 SIX MONTHS »« THREE MONTHS GO PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY FOR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 422 E. Plain Street AN INIMITABLE FEATURE. A cultured gentleman of this city, whose commendation is as valuable as It Is discriminating, says of our “Literary Symposium - ’ page that it is the most remarkable condensation of forceful and able matter he has ever seen in the same space. We have made the assertion that its equal could be attained but by the most eminent magazines of the world, but the same material is possible of production by this paper only, representing as it does the result of special ability and the work of a life-time. We are gratified at the flattering reception this Innovation has received and will continue the symposium each week. This feature is alone worth the price of the paper and should properly form a kind of neutral ground for those who may not agree with our policy and other matter. ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 22 July 1905

tions as belonging more to the province of the poetical—which they really do —his poetical superiority is doubtless a fact. We all know his fate. We know that this transcendent genius was at first patronized and then spurned. We know that he was offered minor positions upon little gutter sheets whose editors were not fit—in a mehtal sense —to black his boots. We know that Edgar Allen Poe, America’s great original genius, was forced for the bare necessities of life to take his gentle wife and open a third-rate boarding house and give food and lodging to the vulgar, the vicious and the drunken. We know that his sensitive soul revolted at the degradation, and that his poverty and misery drove him to abandon a world in which he saw but vulgarity exalted and intellect and beauty crushed under foot. In common with Burns, had he lived under an atmosphere of kindly encouragement, there is no telling what these two might have accomplished for the future delight of coming generations througho...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 22 July 1905

6 DAY DREAMS. The children played in the cool morn air, At what they would like to he; They posed as lords and as ladies fair, And folks of a high degree; For life looks fair at the break of day, With little of work and much of play, Ami all is possible'—so they say— When the heart, when the heart is young. The morning changed to the heat of noon, And then to the twilight chill; The children wearied of high life soon And quarreled, as children will; But.they ran to their home in the fading light To sob out their wrongs ere they said good-night, And the mother, the mother made all things right, For their hearts, oh, their hearts were young. And we need not sorrow as years roll on, If the hopes that have ceased to be, But bring us when passion and youth are gone, To the truth of the Father’s knee; Who husheth us up when our prayers are said, Forgetful of sorrow, in restful bed, To awaken again when the night has fled, When the heart will be always young. —Pall Mall Gazette, HEROINES. ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 22 July 1905

laid with precious stones, and the superior officers rode richly caparisoned chargers purchased at an enormous price from the finest studs of Europe and Asia. * * * * * The most showy pageant of modern life was dull and colorless to the crowded magnificence of the Roman line. ***** The Romans always sought to fight pitched battles. They left the minor services to their allies; and haughtily reserved themselves for the master-strokes by which empires were lost or won. —GEORGE CROLY, in “Salathiel.” A DAY IN SPRING. The day was beautiful, one of those spring days when May suddenly pours forth all its beauty, and when nature seems to have no thought but to rejoice and be happy. Amidst the many murmurs from forest and village, from the sea and the air, a sound of cooing birds could be distinguished. The first butterflies of the season were resting on the early roses. Evei’ything in nature seemed new—the grass, the mosses, the leaves, the perfumes, the rays of light. The pebbles seemed b...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 22 July 1905

8 being such a slick duck, would be bound to make his mark in the world. He did. This young gentleman was evidently deficient both in education and imagination, for he should have known that no machine engaged in the peaceful pursuits of mechanical activity more closely resembles a guillotine than the pile driver, for reduce the size all round, attach a sharp knife set on the bias to the bottom of the weight, and you have in the rough the delicate surgical instrument that parted so many of the French nobility from their head-pieces: this very similarity. 1 contend, should have restrained this aspiring youth in his mad search for fame and glory. It did not, however, and to curtail a long and sad story the last time he put his head under the falling weight the fool and the fool killer met, Fool Killer found him with a vengeance, —there was a dull thud, — Squash! not quite so hard and dry as usual, and while the horrified onlookers were wiping fragments of assorted matter out of their ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 29 July 1905

Vol. I. No. 19. Watered Stock (?) vs. The Public Purse. WHICH CONCERNS THE NORFOLK RAILWAY AND LIGHT COMPANY, AND CONTAINS A FEW FACTS AND FIGURES WHICH MAY BE DIGESTED, AND WHICH MAY CONVINCE THE MERCHANTS AND GENERAL PUBLIC OF THE ENORMOUS PROFITS THEY ARE PAYING ON INFLATED AND IMAGINATIVE VALUES. About the only enterprise we know of in which watered stock is a necessity is an ice manufacturing plant. At this point we pause to smile at our own delightful humor and invite the Norfolk Railway and Light Company, and the general public to join us. Getting this far we suddenly recall that a canal company, or any marine enterprise may be said td' deal in watered stock, but as all these have nothing to do with street railways, electric lighting and power, and gas enterprises, we will not* persue them further. We have had a few things to say about the Norfolk Railway and Light Company at different times, and whenever we have occasion to discuss this charming monopoly, as the “Dispatch” v...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 29 July 1905

2 electric light plant, and the trolley lines, and reorganized on the basis of NINE MILLION DOLLARS ($9,000,000) ! Since the reorganization of the company a new electric light plant was built on Water street, at a cost of $58,000, exclusive of the real estate and building. This was never operated, because, to avoid competition, the Norfolk Railway and Light Company bought it out at a handsome profit. It is said that they paid $125,000 for it. From these alleged, but fairly authenticated transactions, it can be seen, therefore, that the consumers of electric lights are paying the Norfolk Railway and Light Company dividends on that plant, which is not even in operation. This concern now claims that it has reduced the rates, and the figures as published in the city newspapers of May 18th prove that to be correct in some instances. Especially have the rates been reduced to very large consumers, of whom there are but a few, but to the middle men, or say to the consumers who compose a lar...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 29 July 1905

PORTSMOUTH ITEMS. WHAT’S IN A NAME? It is rather remarkable that all the fuss and fury on the part of the “Straightout Democrats” of Norfolk county has taken no other form than a mad and indecent scramble after office. THE MOTTO OF THIS RING SEEMS TO BE “RULE OR RUIN.” Past record, private character, competence in office, general ability, are singly or collectively no deterrent to the ferocious attacks of the “Straightouts.” They must have office or the county—according to them —is gone to the demnition bow-wows. The disgraceful rowdyism, and inability to keep faith among themselves, should convince the sensible and law-abiding people of the county of the calamity that would befall if this horde of spoilseekers ever get within touching distance of the public tills. Let the voters of Norfolk county mark the men who have made capable and honest public servants, and return them to office regardless of the silly twaddle about “straightout democracy.” “Straightout democracy” of this sect...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 29 July 1905

4 Free -Uance Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONK YKAK *1.75 SIX MONTHS 00 TUKKK MONTHS 50 PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY FOR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 422 E. Ham Street INVESTIGATE THAT WRECK! The rear-end collision at Old Town crossing on the Ocean View division of the Norfolk Railway and Light Company injured nearly a dozen passengers and endangered the lives of hundreds, for, if two cool-headed young men had not grabbed the red lanterns on the rear of one of the wrecked cars, ran back and flagged several cars even then swiftly approaching, the consequences might have been frightful. We have failed to observe any of the city papers calling for a rigid investigation of this wreck. One paper mildly suggested that the railway company fix a limit of 100 feet between cars, and there the matter ended. So far as The Free-Lance is concerned, we are not content to let such a serious affair rest, and we call upon the proper authorities—the county judge and grand jury—to prob...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 29 July 1905

IL y |N| We admire the nerve of the Virginian-Pilot! A few days ago it gave a half column to the rare good judgment of Chief Boush for investigating the matter of lighted oil lamps being left on the counters of stores overnight, blandly stating that Mr. Boush had acted ON ITS SUGGESTION that these burning lamps were a menace to life and property. This paper called attention to the matter over three weeks ago, Mr. Boush makes the statement that he reads this paper each week, which shows his good sense and likewise his frank honesty, and Mr, Boush will tell the Virginian—Pilot that his inspiration to look into the subject was prompted by “The Growler.” Indeed, as an obsevant citizen lately remarked, the daily newspapers are having a desperate time to keep within visible distance of us. We don’t mind giving them points. We don’t mind furnishing them food for their editorial columns, but we do object to them appropriating our thunder outright to make their own little noise. Next time we...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 29 July 1905

6 SAD IS THIS SONG OF THE SEA. When tortured by tempest, in passion and pain, While wild winds arc wailing a weird refrain, HOw solemn the sound, and the sight of the sea — How mournful the might of its mad majesty! Its mantle of mourning arraying the beach Gleams white in the light o’er the desolate reach, Where wild winds and waters their symphony merge And “roar in a requiem—die in a dirge.” The oiling all sodden, and nature in tears Seems weeping in vain for the sunshine that cheers, Impressing the sense that of sad days—to me— There’s no day so sad as a sad day at sea. The desolate dunes, and the sombre gray shore Seem lost to the light of the sun evermore; The wail of the tempest is mournful to hear, The tenantless tower looks even more drear. Oh, doleful the prospect! the sky full of woe Sheds tears on the world with no end to the How, Prompting the thought—that no strain is to me More sonlfully sad than the song of the sea. Thus pensive I pondered, repining in vain For sunsh...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 29 July 1905

few fluttering gleams aloft showing that even in that storm they were daring to set some sail. At last, as the fringes of the back-beaten billows, rearing in perpendicular walls, announced that the extreme limit of safety had been reached, the “Chance” made a sharp turn and was instantly lost to the view of the other ships. —From “Cruise of the Cachalot,” by FRANK BULLEN. REST IN THE DEEP. The freshest, the most spacious, the most splendid of all cemeteries, every white curl of the sea a tombstone, and God’s voice in the wind to keep ye sleeping and comfoi’ted. —W. CLARK RUSSELL. It seems to me that a thinking man, with the ambition of a mouse, should never fear death, because once dead, he beecomes wiser than all the living remnant of the human race. —CUTLIFFE HYNE. THE HORRORS OF WAR. All bonds of brotherhood, all human and family relations were dissolved, all authority ceased; the differences between men and men disappeared; Hell unchained all crimes and let them loose on the wor...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 29 July 1905

(Continued from page 3) Is not far off when a civilized public sentiment will abolish it and pay the holders of these offices a stated salary. To the police officers, captains and detectives, we wish to say that they should at all times remember they are the public’s servants, and not their masters, as many of them seem to think. One of their duties is to maintain the peace and not to provoke a breach of it, and one way by which they may accomplish this desirable end is to use courtesy and patience to the utmost extent. There is entirely too much talk 01110115: these servants of the people of “locking people up.’’ It would be a good thing if some of them would lock up their tongues occasionally. It would be a good thing if Captain Dalton could find the murderer of Policeman McNerney to lock up, or some of the escaped criminals and bail jumpers so prevalent hereabouts. If there is any other side to this matter, we stand ready to give it space. CANNIBALISM IN NORFOLK! This is no joke,...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 5 August 1905

Vol. I. No. 20. Where Is Good Government? Mayor Riddick and Billy Dey are at outs, Bruce Simmons is fighting Jesse Reid and Brother Gunn says Jimmie Trehy is on top. , This in brief is the local political situation. At present writing the people have had enough of the brand of “good government” the present crowd have handed out, and what they ask is common sense government that will mean advancement for the town, a government for the benefit of the city and not for a few cheap politicians who have clearly made a sorry mess of the whole business. It is the same old story of a crowd of so-called purificationists working for personal gain to the detriment of those who are not within the favored ring. The old prohibition party promised a political revolution, and revolution it was, for they brought out the blue laws, enforced them to the letter aTld drove thousands of prospective residents away when it became known that a set of fanatics were in charge of the city government. In the cas...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 5 August 1905

2 We can never hope to have real good government until the politicial cancers are removed. A fearless, unpurchasable, conscientious city committee means a fearless, unpurchasable and conscientious council and such a council means the growth of a city which should have forged ahead years ago. We have had too much of penny-wise-pound-fooHsh-backsliding, goodbad government. It’s time the people were waking up! PORTSMOUTH JTEMS. STRAIGHTOUTS AND CONSISTENCY. Are the Straightouts consistent, when, after clamoring for nothing but Simon-pure Democrats to fill countv offices, they deliberately offer as a bribe the first office of the county to a man whom they have time and time again denounced in the strongest language, whom they denounce as unworthy to vote in a democratic nrimary ? Tt looks as if. knowing that they have not the neonle with them, thev offer Finley Cromwell as a bait to attract the influence of Sheriff Cromwell for the carrying of the Tanner’s Creek district. This master-ni...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 5 August 1905

A COMMENDATION WORTH SOMETHING. It was with more than ordinary gratification and pride that we noted the following in the Norfolk Dispatch of July 29th: We welcome to the exchange table The Free-Lance, a weekly publication edited by Mr. George F. Viett, of this city. Mr. Yiett has talent of a high degree and a capacity for expressing himself that is always entertaining. The eight pages of The FreeLance do not contain a single dull line, including their advertisements. The Free-Lance very properly makes boast of its literary symposium, a feature of unquestioned value and interest. We hope to see the Free-Lance thrive and wish its esteemed editor all of the success to which his merits and abilities entitle him. Commendation is valuable in proportion to the quality and calibre of the commendators, and when two such gentlemen as Mr. Thomson and Mr. Ballard of the “Dispatch” staff, jointly place the seal of their approval upon something, that something must have merit. These gentlemen ar...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 5 August 1905

4 ffte Free-Italics Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONK YKAK # .75 SIX MONTHS «0 THREE MONTHS s<> PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY FOR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 422 E. Plain Street SUCH A VERDICT. A few days ago Policeman Wade was arraigned before the police board. A young man named Cooke claimed that Wade had arrested a friend of Cooke's named Hays; that Cooke put his hand on Hays’ shoulder to steady him, when Wade arrested Cooke. Wade claimed that Cooke interfered with him in the discharge of his duty. After hearing the testimony, the members of the board decided that nothing had been brought out that would justify them in dismissing Wade, but he had been “indiscreet,” and that he should be reprimanded before the relief. Such a verdict! Quite in keeping with the delightfully harmonious board. Policeman \\ ade was either guilty or no! guilty of violating the rules governing the department. If he was guilty, he should have been dismissed from the f...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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