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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

PACIF RURAL PRESS Number, i] SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JAN. 7, 1871. [Volume I.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Tree Culture. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Tree Culture.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TREE PLANTING IN CALIFORNIA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

TREE PLANTING IN CALIFORNIA. The season for tree planting has arrived and we are frequently asked the question '''when is the best season or time to transplant trees?" In this climate it makes but little difference whether a tree is set just after the first rains or anytime during the winter months, or in the spring just before the buds swell out into leaf. If your soil is light upland, the fall of the year is undoubtedly the best time. While if it is a low, or heavy stagnant soil, late planting would be better. On the level, low adobe soils around San Francisco Bay for instance, before the land is really suitable for trees, it must be back furrowed into ridges, where the rows of trees are to be set and the drillfurrow should be left open, with a lower cross drain to conduct away all surplus water. Under draining of such soils is, if not absolutely necessary, at least very advisable; and unless there is good drainage, it is better to wait until near spring before planting trees on s...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CALIFORNIA FRUIT AND VEGETABLES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

CALIFORNIA FRUIT AND VEGETABLES. Much has been said and written of the equable and balmy climate of California — a climate unrivalled even under the beautiful skies of Italy. Much has also been said of the soil of its beautiful valleys, which yields harvests most bountifully to the slightest touch of cultivation; and yet the picture has not been overdrawn. That for these reasons our state affords superior inducements to settlers is a supposition true, to a large extent, even now; but likely to be much more so at a more distant day, when certain industrial, agricultural and commercial problems, shall be better understood, and more fully carried out than they are at present. Like any other new country, California, with all its natural advantages, has its drawbacks to the mere working man —the bone and sinew of every land—who comes hither expecting to depend upon his labor, alone, for immediate means of support. Our markets are necessarily limited, and the uncertainty and high price of...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Progress. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Mechanical Progress. The Cotterill Locks.— The Engineer gives a description of these new patent looks, -which we condense:—"The padlock, being without a rivet hinge, could only be forced with great difficulty. The hoop is in one piece with the bolt, and simply slides up and down to open and shut. The street door lock or latch has two keys; one only need be used during the day; by the aid of the other a cover is thrown over the first keyhole, preventing the insertion of the key, and backing up the tumbler with a strong stop plate to prevent the bolt being forced. This lock is applicable to small safes, office doors, etc. The keys are spindles with cams cut on them. The key being a number of eccentric circles. each differing, working in the centre of the tumblers, the lock is perfectly powder proof. Robberies are often committed by copies or impressions of the keys being taken; this is impossible with the Cotterill lock. The key working in the center of the levers gives a great advant...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Scientific Progress. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Scientific Progress. The "Mudlumps" of the Mississippi.— The American Naturalist for December has a notice of an abstract of a paper upon this subject, by Professor Hilgard, the State Geologist of Louisiana, read before the American Association. We quote: "The Mudlumps are islands formed by upheavals of the bottom, off the mouths of the Passes, inside the bar. They often rise in midchannel, obstructing navigation and diverting the current, and at times bringing up objects long ago lost from vessels. They form a number of pretty large islands, especially near the mouth of the Southwest Pass. On them we frequently find springs of liquid mud, accompanied by bubbles of combustible gas ; these springs often exhibit all the phenomena of mud volcanoes —extensive cones of mud, with an active crater in the middle. Most of the material of the Mudlumps seen above water, bears evidence of having once belonged to active cones, now extinct. The conclusion reached is, that the mud is the same as t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Correspondence. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Correspondence.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Notes of Travel in Colusa and Yolo Counties. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Notes of Travel in Colusa and Yolo Counties. [Written fob the Pbess.] To persons resident in, and familiar with Yolo and Colusa counties, no explanation of the accompanying map of Grand Island is necessary. But as the work of reclaiming this section is one of the most extensive in the State, and therefore of more or less interest to all, I submit a few explanations. Bridgeport, shown in the upper end of the map, is situated near the north end of Grand Island, six miles south of Colusa, and about eight miles north of the line of Yolo county. It consists of a store, blacksmith shop and a few dwellings. Eddy's Landing, six miles south of Bridgeport, is similarly situated. There is a ferry for crossing the Sacramento River at this point. Grand Island is a village of about 100 inhabitants, situated one mile south of Eddy's Landing, and is a very promising little place. John Bader is the village blacksmith, and C. J. & G. E. Diefendorff are the principal merchants. Knight's La...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
San Francisco Notion versus Boston Notion. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

San Francisco Notion versus Boston Notion. Eds. Press :—ln your last issue, you notice a Boston device by which runaway horses can be instantly detached from their carriage. But is not the San Francisco invention of Dr. Le Plongeon (recently patented through your office), by which runaway horses can be instantly checked and controlled and kept by the carriage, infinitely preferable? Detached runaway horses may do much harm to others, but Le Plongeon's contrivance prevents all this. His halter is cheap, can be fitted to any bridle, and is well worthy of a trial. It can be found at Main & Winchester's, Battery street. [Personally, we should greatly prefer Dr. Le Plongeon's method to the other, and coincide fully in the opinion of our correspondent in believing that it is at least "well worthy of a trial."—Eds. Press.]

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Cool Impudence. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Cool Impudence. A couple of New York lawyers send uh a request to insert an advertisement in our paper, to the effect that they will obtain divorces anywhere, anyhow and for anybody, and without any publicity. We supposo the last means that they propose to obtain divorces without the knowledge of more than one of the parties interested. This matter of obtaining divorces seems to be quite a flourishing business in the States beyond the mountains. Almost every day we see accounts of most disgraceful events of the kind. To such a shameful extent are these things carried on, that people are becoming aroused to the neces • sity of taking strong measures in the matter; and one NeV York judge has declared from the bench that he will mete out heavy punishment to legal parties who carry through the improper divorce cases by unrighteous means. However our Pacific Coast population may compare in other respects with those of the Atlantic Coast, we have not yet reached the point attained theve i...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Hope and Farm. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Hope and Farm.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE NEEDS OF AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

THE NEEDS OF AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITIES. FOR THE PRESS —BY DR. E. 8. CARR. [Prof, of Chemistry and Agriculture in the University of California.] As the Army Scout, who goes before to report obstacles in the way of progress, and the strength of the enemy, though he claims no capacity for generalship, feels himself as truly a soldier as any man in the ranks, so I who do not own a foot of land, offer you some reflections upon the needs of Agriculture and Agricultural Communities, gathered during twenty years hard lighting in the cause of Industrial Education. I claim too as early and intimate an acquaintance with this pursuit as the sage of the New York Tribune, for I have ploughed when ploughing was not a pleasant ride over flowing fields, and mowed among boulders and Canada thistles where every bushel of corn cost more in patience and muscle than a ship load of California grain. I could match Mr. Greeley's experience on the barren hills of New Hampshire with my own on the Manor of Rens...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
MANURING LANDS IN CALIFORNIA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

MANURING LANDS IN CALIFORNIA. The proper time to apply manure to land in California, where dry and rainy seasons follow each other, is in the fall or early winter. The rains then dissolve and carry its soluble salts —the strength of the manure — into the soil. Land that is freshly plowed, and lays rough in furrows, is in the best condition to receive its supply of manure. It is admissablo to spread that from the stable upon the surface, and either let it lay exposed, or else lightly work it into the surface soil—the latter is preferable. Thoroughly rotted manure may bo plowed under; but it is best not the first season to deeply cover coarse manure and straw. It does not so readily decompose beneath as upon the surface of the soil. During summer, coarse manure, upon or near the surface, acts as a mulching to protect the under soil from drying out; while if fallowed deeply under, it leaves the soil in such loose condition that it dries out sooner, and the eapilary action from below is...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE CULTIVATION OF POPPY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

THE CULTIVATION OF POPPY. Dr. L. Lanszweert A recent analysis of a sample of opium obtained from poppies raised in Novato, Marin County, by Mr. Baudrye, proves that with proper care the culture of the poppy for opium, and oil from its seeds, would be remunerative to the California agriculturist. Although the amount of morphia in this sample was only 5.75 per cent., —a small percentage compared to the yield obtained from opium produced in Hancock, Vermont, by Mr. Bobbins, 15.75 per cent., as stated in the Alia, Nov. 2d, 1870; still, even this yield shows that opium of excellent quality can be produced in this state. It should be borne in mind that the commercial value of the article depends on the richness of morphia and other alealoides, which yield will depend on the nature of the ground on which the poppy is cultivated, the quality and quantity of manure employed, the state of maturity of the pod from which it has been gathered, and the atmospheric influences to which the cultivat...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
RELATIVE FOOD VALUE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

RELATIVE FOOD VALUE. As fodder, the straw of our leading grain crops grades as follows —the best first: Oat, barley, wheat, rye. It is doubtful whether there is a better root than the potato for feeding for milk. A farmer in Ohio has found that 36 quarts of carrots gave him 32 pounds of milk, and 36 quarts of potatoes gave him 40 pounds of milk. The other food given the cow was dry hay. Dr. Wiggins, inspector n> Providence, R. 1., has been comparing milk with other foods as to cost, and his results are given as follows: "I estimate sirloin steak (reckoning loss from bone) at 34c. per pound as dear as milk at 24c. a quart; round steak at 20c. as dear as milk at 14c; eggs at 30c. a dozen as dear as milk at 20c. a quart. Many laborers who pay 17c. for corned beef would onsider themselves hardly able to pay 10c. for milk, when, in fact, they could as well afford to pay 15c. If the money expended for veal and pork were expended for milk, I doubt not it would be an advantage bo...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL REPORTS-SEEDS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

AGRICULTURAL REPORTS-SEEDS. Having had numerous enquiries for copies of the Annual Agricultural Reports, we addressed a note to the Commissioner Capron, from whom we have received the following reply: — Editors of Pacific Rural Press. Sirs. — Your application for copies of the Annual Report for 1869, has been received. In answer I regret to state that the limited number allotted to' this department by Congress, will prevent me from complying with your request. The Annual Report of this department is printed by Congress and mainly distributed by its members to their constituents upon application by letter or otherwise. Out of two hundred and twenty-four thousand five hundred copies ordered by Congress, but twenty-three thousand are allowed for the use of this office. It will doubtless require this entire number to supply our regular statistical correspondents, the agricultural societies and clubs, library rtHsociations, and foreign exchanges, all of which we are expected to supply fr...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Swine Herd. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

The Swine Herd.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CURRYING HOGS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

CURRYING HOGS. Prof. Johnson, the well known agricultural writer relates an experiment which he made of the use of friction in the treatment, of hogs, the skin of which animal is much like that of the human race. He treated six pigs with a curry-comb for the space of seven weeks, and left three others in the same pen untouched. The resiilt was a relative gain of thirty three pounds more in the weight of the animals so treated, than the neglected ones, together with alarge saving in the amount of food respectively fed out. This result was due to the fact that by means of friction, in the use of the curry-comb, all the functions of the body were more perfectly performed—the skin was kept free from filth and the pores in a condition to perform thair functions to the best advantage. The same advantage is thereby gained for the pig which accrues to the human system from bathing, friction and general cleanliness. A calculation has been made from similar premises by which it is estimated t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CLEAN PIGS AND DIRTY PIGS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

CLEAN PIGS AND DIRTY PIGS. Pigs enjoy the reputation of having a real liking for dirt; and certainly, the way in which they are kept on some farms would show that their owners are determined to give them ample opportunities for carrying out this liking. No notion can, however, be more erroneous than this, as none is certainly so productive of loss to the keeper. Let any one not convinced of this, try the two modes of pig-keeping—the dirty and the clean —the food in both cases, and other general treatment being the same; and the result will show him which of the two is the best in the end. A great deal depends upon the mode in which they are housed. Mr. Raines, of Mills, adopts the following: A large out-house is inclosed at the sides, so as to be warm and dry. The floor is paved, and sprinkled over with burnt clay, and ashes obtained by burning weeds; \ in this the pigs are fed; while for resting and sleeping they have a compartment railed off at the other end, and which is amply pr...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Poultry Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

O ur Poultry Notes.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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