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Elephind.com contains 719 items from Children's Newspaper, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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OURSELVES. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

OURSELVES. As the first CHILDREN'S NEWS- PAPER in Australia we make our bow to-day. It is, indeed, a very wonderful adventure, and it shows how the world is widening for young people. A newspaper for " grown- ups " is a very modern invention, but one for children is absolutely new. Our first issue must not be taken as a fair sample of what we intend to do, because we have to make a start without the assistance ?of our readers. When the boys and girls of Australia see what we are .aiming at they will help us. Here is our first number ! We hope to improve on it month by month. In our next issue we will start a series of stories of the lives of great Englishmen. The first will be " Cecil Rhodes, the Great Empire Builder of South Africa." Then we will also begin "The Story of the Sudan." We desire to widen the horizon of the school world, and get our boys and girls to take a living, intelligent interest in the daily progress of our mighty empire, and to this end we will furnish the news...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CYCLIST PURSUED BY A LION. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

A CYCLIST PURSUED BY A LION " When I left the main road I dis- mounted and started pushing my bicycle up the hill ; but before I had gone far I heard a heavy body pushing its way through the bush on my left. I thought it was some big game, possibly an eland or buffalo ; but as I felt a certain amount of uneasiness, I went to the other side of the road, and pushed away as quickly as I could. When I had gone a short distance up the slope I looked round, and almost had a fit when I saw a full-grown lion standing across the road, broadside on, with his head turned towards me, and, as I looked, he started in pursuit. I attempted to mount my machine, but, owing to the slope and my excitement I failed twice. The third time I succeeded in getting away, and I did pedal for all I was worth ; but the machine kept wobbling across the road, and I saw that the lion had lessened the distance between us by about half, though I was still 50 yards from the top of the slope. He kept up a low growling ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STORIES ABOUT GREAT PEOPLE. The Gardener. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

STORIES ABOUT GREAT PEOPLE. The Gardener. Von Moltke, the greatest strategist of our time, was very fond of gardening, and might often be seen, dressed in an old straw hat and a gardener's holland snit, busily engaged pruning his flowers. Once, when on a visit to a friend, the news got abroad that the great man was staying in the neighbourhood. A stranger, seeing in the grounds an old man who seemed to be a gardener, asked him when would be the best time to get a sight of Moltke. "Oh," said the gardener, "I know him quite well. About 3 o'clock is the best time to see him." Grateful for the information, the stranger handed the gardener a mark. When he returned in the afternoon, he was astonished to see the Field Marshal-the old gardener of the morning-surrounded by his friends. "Ah!" said Moltke, holding up his hand, " I have got your mark !"

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
An Anecdote of Gordon. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

An Anecdote of Gordon. " Pride," said Hassan, " was unknown to Gordon. One day, on our way to El Fasher, one of the attendants shot a bustard ; and when we halted at noon, the cook at once boiled some water, and threw the bird into the pot so as to take off its feathers. Gordon, seeing this, went and sat himself down by the cook, and began helping him to pull out the feathers. I at once rushed up, and begged him to allow me to do this for him, but he answered, " Why should I be ashamed of doing work ? I am quite able to wait on myself, and certainly do not require a Bey to do my kitchen work for me."

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SCHOOL OF SEVEN. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

A SCHOOL OF SEVEN, BY LOUISE MACK. The seven little girls stood in a stiff row, with their toes turned out to the thin red line in the pattern of the drab linoleum underfoot. Their elbows were drawn in tightly to their little waists, their hands were held out, palms uppermost, and their fingers were bent inwards from the first joint till they touched the palms, and till the nails were well exposed to the eyes of Miss Emily, their teacher. Slowly and critically her eyes travelled along these seventy little upturned nails, and pink, child fingers. When she came to the seventieth her lips smiled a little. " They are all very nice," she said. The extreme gravity of the little girls' eyes relaxed ever- so slightly. With one accord they all opened their mouths, drew their lips carefully back, and let two rows of tightly-clenched teeth be plainly seen. Again Miss Emily's eyes went slowly down the line. They rested on the teeth this time. " Very nice, indeed," she said at last. Her smile wa...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SCIENCE. The Round, Rolling Earth. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

SCIENCE. --? The Round, Rolling Earth. By "GOSSIP." Once upon a time, a very long time ago, I was teaching a class of coloured people in the United States. Many of them were runaway slaves, who still bore the marks of the whip and the branding iron on their bodies. They were very simple people, and very, very ignorant. The men amongst them were like very little children in their utter ignorance of the world, and all the things therein. Because I had read books and could write, they looked upon me as a wise man until one unhappy Sunday after- noon. I have forgotten what our lesson was about, but during the afternoon I said something about the great mystery of earth, and I showed them what I meant with my hands. I said, " We live on a round world, a globe, which is for ever flying round the sun, and turning as it flies. At noon we are opposite the sun, here (showing them with my shut fist) and at midnight we are down here," again showing them what I meant, with my hands. Then I went o...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FACTS WORTH KNOWING. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

FACTS WORTH KNOWING. Since 1851, says the Review of Reviews, Australia has added nearly £400,000,000 in virgin gold to the world's treasure chest ; and there is no sign that this amazing output of precious metal is ex- hausted. It is a vast mistake to think that Siberia is simply a Russian convict prison. On the contrary, it is being rapidly filled up by free settlers. In the last ten years no less than a million Russians have emigrated to Siberia. The Trans-Asiatic railway, which, by the way, will join the English Channel to the Sea of China, will greatly increase the possibilities of Siberia. More engines of destruction ! An English engineer has invented a gun that will fire 30,000 bullets in a minute. If a fair proportion of these could get home, there would be no more fighting between civilized nations. The Russians have invented a shell which, on bursting, liberates fumes strong enough to send a whole regiment to sleep. In the November number of Harms worth's, a writer gives so...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CHILD WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

THE CHILD WORLD. This page is for the little ones-and little ones only. The big ones who have got into long trousers, or have got beyond the stage of pinafores, may turn over and read elsewhere. If they are good, however, and do not carry their noses too high in the air-as foolish grown-up people often do-we will let them peep in at our show, and ever have a romp ia our play-room.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER may be ordered from all booksellers and news- agents at ONE PENNY per month.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

POE EXCELLENCE OF QUALITY USE 9 Flaked Oatmeal PARSONS Goofed, Rolled Oats Pasha & Eliphant Coffe D. S. F. Mustard Horçoro Cocoa and Table Jellies. Try MOTHER HUBBARD JAN). Best on, the IV|arKet. Printed and Published by the Proprietors, WM. BROOKS & Co., 17 Castlereagh-street, Sydney.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Home of the Albatross. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

The Home of the Albatross. Everyone who has been on a sea voyage has seen the albatross, sailing in wide circles round the ship, and never seeming to be weary. For thousands of miles through sunshine and storm it goes, now rising high into the air and sporting with the winds, and now wheeling downwards and skimming the crests of the waves with its wing. It loves the great ocean spaces and the wild freedom of the winds. Yet its home is not on the sea. Far away, many thousands of miles away, perhaps, on some lonely, wind-swept islet, its little ones wait for the return of the absent parent. That is the real home of the bird. There is an island south of New Zea- land where albatrosses are to be found in great numbers during the nesting season. They build their nests on the side of a tussocky hill. The nest is a very simple thing, made of earth and grass and leaves. Round it there is a sort of trench, perhaps to drain off the rainwater. In each nest a single egg is laid, an egg four or ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Transvaal. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

The Transvaal. A Johannesburg journal, the Rand Post, advises that in the event of a war with England, the women and children and persons who have shown themselves friendly to the Boers, should be given a day to leave, and that after that the city should be laid in ruins, and the Uitlanders thrown down the shafts of the mines. The Boer batteries armed with the latest Krupp guns could certainly demolish the town in a few hours, but Oom Pauls' income depends so much upon the hated foreigners, mostly English, that he should be the last person in the world to think of closing the mines with their corpses. The Uitlanders, it is worth while to recall, outnumber the Boers by at least three to one. They supply all the capital to work the mines, and they pay nineteen-twentieths of the taxes. For these privileges they have no rights as citizens. They are far too useful, how- ever, to be destroyed, if that were possible.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Little Pappoose. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

The Little Pappoose. Indian mothers carry their babies on, their backs, tucked round with the only garment they wear, a sort of shawl. When they wish to leave them for & while, they swing them in a hammock between two trees, and the little pappooses seem quite happy in their swinging nests. I once saw a German baby hung up in a kind of pocket to a nail on the wall. It was a very sad looking baby, and I fear it grew up with bandy legs.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

There is a beautiful book of poems songs for children-called " The Child1 World," by Gabriel Setoun, and filled with beautiful pictures by Charles Robinson. The book is like the pleasantest dream you have ever had. Here are three verses from the " Morn- ing Song " : Boys and girls, get out of bed The sun is shining round and red, And waking every sleepy head To go to school in the morning. This is the way we brush our boots ; Make them bright, both left and right, This is the way we brush our boots To go to school in the morning. The dewy grass is growing green ; The face of every flower is clean, And children also should be seen As fair for school in the morning..

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HUMOURIST. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

THE HUMOURIST. The infant daughter of a country clergyman, drinking tea in the nursery of the episcopal palace, boasted that at the vicarage they had a hen which laid an egg every day. " Oh, that's nothing," retorted the bishop's daughter, " ' Papa lays a foundation-stone every week." Two small boys, walking down Totten- ham Court Road, passed a tobacconist's shop. The bigger remarked--" I say, Bill, I've got a ha'penny, and if you've got one too, we'll have a penny smoke between us." Bill produced his copper, and Tommy, diving into the shop, promptly re-appeared with a penny cigar in his mouth. The boys walked siilo by side for a few minutes, when the smaller mildly said, "I say, Tom, when am I to have a puff? The weed's half mine." " Oh, you shut up," was the business-like reply. "I'm the chairman of this company, and you are only a shareholder. You can spit. -Collections and Recollections.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Royal Ploughman. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

A Royal Ploughman. The Emperor of China is bound by a curious custom to go once a year to a field within the Imperial City and plough a furrow with his own hands. Tins quaint ceremony is intended to show the honourable nature of agriculture. It might be a good thing if great folks in Australia paid a similar homage to the greatest of all the industries. All the male members of the German Royal Family are, perhaps for the same reason, taught a trade.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
He Could Stand It No Longer. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

He Could Stand It No Longer. John Adams, the second President of the United States, used to tell the follow- ing anecdote :-"When I was a boy I used to study Latin grammar ; but it was dull and 1 hated it. My father was anxious to send me to college, and so I went on studying the grammar till I could stand it no longer ; and, going to my father, I told him I did not like study, and asked for some other employment. "My father said: 'Well, John, if Latin grammar docs not suit you, try ditching-perhaps that will. My meadow yonder needs a ditch, and you may put by Latin and try that.' This seemed a delightful change ; and to the meadow I went. But I found ditching harder than Latin, and the first forenoon was the longest, I ever experienced. That day I ate the bread of labour, and glad was I when night came on. That night I made some comparison between Latin grammar and ditching, but said not a word about it. I dug next forenoon, and wanted to return to Latin at dinner ; but it was humi...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"That Egyptian Gentleman!" [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

" That Egyptian Gentleman !" An amusing incident took place in connection with the Sirdar's visit to the Marquis of Salisbury. Sir Herbert Kitchener arrived at King's cross station about 20 minutes before the departure of his train, and began to stroll up and down the platform, although Mr. Melson, the station-master, offered him the use of his private office. The fact of the Sirdar's departure for Hatfield soon began to be noised about, and many persons waited in the vicinity of the booking-hall to catch a glimpse of the hero of Omdurman. Sir Herbert was not recognised at first, and while strolling by, says the Daily News, he was accosted by a stranger, who said, " I understand we are to have the honour of travelling with a big man to-night." Oh," said Sir Herbert, ingenuously, " and who is that?" "Why, the great general is going down to Hatfield," replied the stranger. " The great general-who do you mean ?" asked Sir Herbert. " Why, that Egyptian gentleman, what's his name ?" -

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Looking After Number One. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

Looking After Number One. The publication of Dr. Busch's book on Bismarck has revived some very good stories about the great statesman. Per- haps none is more characteristic than the egg story. The incident happened on the day of Gravelotte, when officers and men went hungry to battle. The way the Chancellor always told this story was as follows :-"The Duke of Mecklen- burg and General Sheridan were staying with me. I went out and managed to buy five eggs at a thaler each. I said to myself, ' Li I take them home I must give two to the Grand Duke and two to Sheridan. There will be only one for me.' So I ate two and took home three, and then there was one for each. I told the Grand Duke many years afterwards, and he forgave me. Sheridan I could not tell. He died. He never knew."

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 30 January 1899

A moa's egg has recently been found in New Zealand. It had evidently been preserved in clay bank by the side of a stream.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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