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Elephind.com contains 3,227 items from Irrigation Record, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Ensilage. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 February 1913

Ensilage. SOME irrigation farmers have green fod der crops and cannot find immediate us« for them owing to their not having yet secured farm animals. Much of this may be saved as ensilage. Later on this material will be found very useful for stock feed, especially for dairy cattle. The best ensilage is made in properly constructed circular silos, the stuff being cut up with a silage cutter. To erect silos of this kind is rather costly for the new beginner. A substitute is found in the pit silo or the stack. It may suit the majority of the settlers having sur plus fodder crops this year to make sil age stacks. This is the cheapesst method. There may be a little loss round the edges of the stack, but even this is better than allowing the whole valuable fodder to go to waste. Maize, sorghum, amber cane and mil let are growing on the area, and should be conserved as ensilage. Millet being finer in the stalk, could be made into ordinary hay, but if cut green and made into silage it is a ...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Irrigation and Cultivation [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 February 1913

Irrigation and Cultivation "THE minimum of water and maximum of cultivation" is the motto every farmer should fix in his mind. It is the key to successful agriculture, determined through long years of scientific research and practical demonstration. Whether crops are produced under irrigation or with the aid of the ordinary rainfall, the requirements of the soil to enable it to produce plants are the same. Farmers operating on non-irrigable lands know the ill-effects to the crops through continuous heavy rains, or pro longed periods of dry weather. Either of these conditions is fatal to good yields. In regions of intermittent or limited an nual rainfall where irrigation is not prac ticable, certain principles of cultivation, such as fallowing, are practised to con serve the rainfall in the soil. The mois ture which occurs during a year or more is thus held, to a very great extent, in the soil. It is therefore possible to produce crops where the rainfall, although per haps ample in t...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Potato Culture. Assistant Inspector of Agriculture. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 February 1913

Potato Culture. (BY A. J. PINN.) Assistant Inspector of Agriculture. BEFORE discu sing the cultivation of the potato on the irrigation areas, it would be as well to consider the other districts of the State in order to know when the crops are harvested, this being the chief factor in influencing prices. The State, as regards the growing of potatoes, is divided into two divisions. The chief division is on the Tablelands, the main districts being Orange and Millthorpe in the West; New England, Guyra, Black Mountain, Glen Innes, on the North; Crookwell, Monaro, and Bat low, on the South. In all these districts the climate is cool, and it is only possible to grow one crop of potatoes in the year.' The main crop is planted in October and November, and early December, the potatoes being harvested in autumn and winter. These potatoes are available for consumption all through the autumn, winter and spring. The second division is the North Coast, the Clarence River being the chief centre. In...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Hay Crops. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 February 1913

Hay Crops. SETTLERS holding the larger irrigable farms-50 acres or thereabouts-should consider the desirability of planting hay crops. It is better to take off a hay crop the first year before seeding the land to lucerne; the reason for which is given in the notes on lucerne in this issue. A hay drop should bring in a good monetary return the first year. Oats and wheat do well under irriga tion in these districts, provided the varieties of either cereal are suited to the conditions. Algerian and Abundance oats have shown their adaptability. The wheats found most suitable are Zealand; Marshall's No. 3; Huguenot; Florence, and Firbank. The first three kinds are slow, and the last two quick maturing, and' should be sown accordingly. The manager of the Yanco Experiment Farm (Mr. Chomley) states that Darts Imperial and Steinwedel make good hay wheats in addition to th6 above varieties under irrigation. Zealand yielded 3 tons 13cwts. per acre. Graded seed at the rate of 45 lbs. per acre s...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Fruit Growing. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 February 1913

Fruit Growing. As fruit growing is to become a promi nent industry among settlers on the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Areas, the ex pert officers of the Commissioner for Irrigation have compiled the following notes for the guidance of crchardists. The main items for consideration are: 1. The commercial value of the fruit to be produced. 2. Varieties of fruit suited to the cli matic and other local conditions, and the yielding powers thereof. 3. Best practice in producing fruit and methods of irrigation. 4. Marketing facilities-canning fac tories. 5. Period that must elapse before the orchardist may expect a return from the various fruit trees. THE PEACH. This should be a profitable fruit to grow on the irrigation area. The varie ties recommended for canning are Cali fornia Cling, Puller's Cling, ..and Italian Cling, Elberta, Lady Palmerston and Comet (freestone). Begins to bear third year, thence to eight years, when the trees are full bearing. Average yield from 2 to 6 tons per acre, ac...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Lucerne. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 February 1913

Lucerne. THE Murrumbidgee Irrigation Areas promise to be great producers of lucerne, the most valuable fodder plant known. The lucerne fields established by Sir Samuel McCaughey, on the Yanco Estate prior to its being acquired by the Govern ment, are being used in some cases by settlers. Here and there a fair stand of lucerne is yet seen; but generally the crop is too thin, the result of excessive feed ing by sheep. Lucerne will not stand grazing too closely. Sheep eat into the crown of the plant, and either impair its vitality or destroy it altogether. While settlers are advised to plough out the old lucerne crop where it is too thin and re-seed the land, it is evi dent from the results of the original crops that the soil and climate will abundantly produce this plant under irrigation, provided the land is properly prepared and good seed sown. It is recorded by a reliable writer that a field of lucerne planted 200 years ago in Old Mexico, and not re-seeded since, is even now yieldi...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 February 1913

m w | NOTES, f /.?. . ? «? >pyo -y^ryj^y^cy^ri^c^ri^cy^i Pcvrpi SETTLERS are reminded that sorghum, at certain stages of growth, contains poi sonous properties highly dangerous to cattle. Numbers of deaths among dairy cattle have occurred in other places through sorghum poisoning. When grown in rich soils containing large amounts of nitrogen, sorghum creates highly dan gerous quantities of hydrocyanic acid commonly known as prussic acid. In soils poor in nitrogen, amounts of the poison are not so high ; in fact in most cases not up to the danger limit. This ex plains why some animals are not poison ed through eating the plant in one field, while those in another field adjoining have died through eating sorghum. Dr. Maxwell, of the Queensland Department of Agriculture, reported that sorghum, grown as stated, could not be freely fed to animals with safety until the plant is preparing to seed. When the plant is from three to seven weeks old it is the most dangerous. After that the p...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Irrigation Record. Published Fortnightly under the authority of the Commissioner for Irrigation at Leeton, New South Wales, Australia. Address all communications to THE EDITOR, "Irrigation Record," Leeton, N.S.W. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 February 1913

Irrigation Record Published Fortnightly under the authority of the Commissioner for Irrigation at Leeton, New South Wales, Australia. Address all communications to THE EDITOR, " Irriga tion Record," Leeton, N.S.W. THE first issue of the "Irrigation Record" for the dissemination of practical infor mation among the farmers of the irriga tion areas, has a significance of unusual interest to this State. It marks an epoch in the producing power of the country. It is an evidence that a large territory of highly fertile land is being rescued for the agriculturist and orchardist from the uncertainty of production always associ ated with a dependence on the ordinary rainfall. i That a stage of solid progress has been reached in the new development is mani fest in the necessity for the journal now issued. There are some experienced irri gation farmers on the area; but there are many others with lesser knowledge of the "magic science of irrigation." They have, however, the intelligence, indust...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Developing Small Holdings. INTENSIVE CULTURE. I. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 1 March 1913

Developing Small Holdings. INTENSIVE CULTURE. I. THE settler with a 2-acre block is asking hiow he can utilise it so as to get the greatest monetary return. By an inten sive system of culture surprising finan cial results may be obtained even from this small area under irrigation. There are many garden products suited to the requirements of the 2-acre man, and among the most prominent is the straw berry. There is no fruit that will return a greater income for the time and money expended than the strawberry. On the 2-acre holding the settler will no doubt plant some fruit trees. The space between the trees may be well used for intercul tural crops. Thus the whole of the avail able portion of the 2-acre block is being put to constant use. The best methods for producing strawberries are described by Mr. W. J. Allen, Fruit Expert to the Department. There is a good demand for good straw berries, says Mr. Allen, in and around Sydney. In the country towns, too, straw berries are as a rule ...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Irrigation Record. Published Fortnightly under the authority of the Commissioner for Irrigation at Leeton, New South Wales, Australia. Address all communications to THE EDITOR, "Irrigation Record," Leeton, N.S.W. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 1 March 1913

Irrigation IRecoib. Published Fortnightly under tlie authority of the Commissioner for Irrigation at Leeton, New South Wales, Australia. Address all communications to THE EDITOR, " Irriga tion Record," Leeton, N.S.W. SETTLEMENT on the irrigation areas is proceeding very satisfactorily. Out of about 600 farms made available since July last on the first sub-division known as Yanco, 400 have now been allotted. The majority of these farms have been acquired by Australians, while there are a few Americans and Europeans. The remaining 200 farms on the first area of Yanco may be said to be highly suited to dairying or mixed farming. The pros pects of a dairy farmer with an irrigable area of 50 acres, and a .subsidiary "dry" area of 150 acres, should be sufficiently alluring to those who realise the value of the dairy cow as a component in mixed husbandry. A large number of Aus tralian farmers understand practical dairying, and the inducement held out at Yanco should be an incentive to comm...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Correspondence. (These columns are open for the discussion of any question touching the development of the irrigation settlement. Letters must be accompanied by the name and address of the writer, not necessarily for publication. Matter intended for publication in the succeeding issue must reach the office, Leeton, not later than the 10th or 25th of the month. The Irrigation Record is published on the 1st and 15th day of each month.) CAPITAL REQUIRED TO DEVELOP A 50-ACRE FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 1 March 1913

Correspondence. (These columns are open for the discussion of any question touching- the development of the irrigation settlement. Letters must be accompanied by the name and address of the writer, not necessarily for publica tion. Matter intended for publication in the succeeding issue must reach the office, Leeton, not later than the . 10th or 25th of the month. The Irrigation Record is published on the 1st and 15th day of each month.) CAPITAL REQUIRED TO DEVELOP A 50-ACRE FARM. There has been much controversy among settlers as to the amount of capital re quired to develop a 50-acre farm on the irrigation areas-that is, to bring the farm up to the standard when it may be con sidered as payable. Correspondence is invited on this question. The opinions of settlers actually engaged in the work would be of great interest, and will be published either above the real name of the writer or a nom de plume. IRRIGATION AND FROST. . A settler queries as to whether irriga tion tends to save v...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advisory Board. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 1 March 1913

Advisory Board. A MEETING of the Advisory Board was held on February 18th at the Commis sioner's Office, Leeton, the Manager, Mr. J. B. Broatch, presiding. Members present: Messrs. P. Hourigan, J. Noorian, R. Simpson, A. F. Monk, Dr. s S. S. Smith, W. J. Adams, A. E. Cook, C. F. Chaplin (Secretary), A. Gornitzka, T. H. Hogan, James Best, A. A. Lock wood, W. Nulty, G. M. Neilsen, W. J. Williams, and J. Dunn. Messrs. W. J. Allen (Acting Irrigation Expert), Fackender (Dairy Expert), Leppien (Engineer for Water Distribution), were also present. FRUIT GROWING. Messrs. S. Alexander and C. E. B. Duff sent apologies for their absence, but noti fied results of their interviews with set tlers in their respective sections relative to the areas proposed to be planted with fruit trees during the forthcoming sea son. The reports of members showed that settlers intended to plant 'fruit trees, which, in addition to those already set out, would aggregate an area- of 283 acres. It was pointed out by ...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Pigs. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 1 March 1913

SETTLERS should be now considering the expediency of starting to raise pigs. A butter factory is already erected on the irrigation area, and a bacon factory is to be at once established at Leeton. Mr. H. W. Potts, Principal, Hawkes bury Agricultural College, furnishes in structive notes on breeding pigs for hams, bacon, or pork. Mr. Potts con tends that increased attention to pigs is essential on a thriving dairy farm, apart from the remunerative position this form of stock-raising occupies on a. general farm, orchard, or vegetable garden. The trade in dealing with pigs and their products is now becoming better organised. The recent efforts being made by the Department of Agriculture to in stitute an export trade with Great Britain promise favourably, more particularly in the direction of educating a class of cur ers to prepare bacon and lard in the manner most suitable for consumers. The object is to place our trade in a position to compete successfully with the Danish, Dutch, Iris...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Dairy Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 1 March 1913

Dairy Notes. THE following notes on the care and handling of milk and cream by Mr. Fac kender, manager dairy branch, Yanco Irrigation Areas, should be carefully stu died by everyone engaged in dairying. Uncleanliness in dealing with such sen sitive material as milk and cream ren ders the manufacture of high-class butter Dairy Heifers as supplied to settlers on the irrigation areas by the Commissioner for Irrigation, on liberal terms. An unusual opportunity is here afforded industrious farmers to make a start in the lucrative business of Dairying. Under irrigation great quantities of first-class fodder for dairy cows can be produced and conserved for any season of the year. The climate is ideal for dairy animals. A butter factory with the very latest improvements, under the charge of an experienced manager, is erected in a convenient centre. impossible. The loss through this re coils on the dairy farmer. We are em barking on one of the most lucrative of the rural industries, and it w...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Citrus. WASHINGTON NAVELS FOR EXPORT. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 1 March 1913

Citrus. WASHINGTON NAVELS FOR EXPORT. Mr. P. W. Pickering, of Mildura, writ ing in the "Fruit World," refers to the Washington Navel orange for export. The best soil on the River Murray for growing oranges is a sandy loam, of not less than 2 feet deep, with good drain age. He states that had he his "time over again he would not plant a single grape vine in Mildura." The growing of navel oranges for ex port should be a profitable investment. As regards the Australian market there are quite enough common oranges grown. The choice Washingtons would bring a much higher price amongst the wealthy classes of England. The fruit would get Home after the strawberry season, and in August or September the luscious orange would command a high price. Washington Navels at 7s. 6d. per case would show a profit to the grower. If the export trade be properly handled, not less than 9s. or 10s. should be ob tained, taking the good years with the bad. Mr. Pickering considers that an average of 4 cases pe...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Economic Fruit Growing. W. J. ALLEN. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 1 March 1913

Economic Fruit Growing. W. J. ALLEN. IF any man hopes to make a commercial success of fruit-growing he must make a business of it, and it is a business which requires peculiar adaptations on the part of those who would follow it successfully. It is frequently noticed that two men living side by side and working under similar conditions do not always have equal returns; the one will make a commercial success of his busi ness whilst the other will fail dismally; and so it is with all industries. We can not all be successful with sheep, but perhaps the man who may fail with fruit with do well with sheep, while his more fortunate neighbour who has made a success of fruit-growing might fail if he undertook wheat-growing. How TO ESTABLISH AN ORCHARD. Before beginning it is well to consider why you are going to grow fruit and for what purpose; as, if it is only pro posed to grow sufficient for household purposes, only a small orchard of as sorted fruits would be required; whilst, on the ot...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 1 March 1913

*«sO .«. ri 3caOt^ _ «« » m , . _ . . .. i a NOTES, s *i \ , J^UCERNE land, unless there have been good early soaking rains, should receive a thorough irrigating in March, and as soon as it is dry enough it should be ploughed and harrowed at once, and kept worked with cultivator and harrows. Furrow irrigation on heavy soils is bet ter than flooding for this purpose. The irrigating should germinate any weed seed lying in the ground, which the sub sequent harrowing will eradicate. The seed may be sown in April without a cover crop (that is, nothing is sown with it, neither wheat, oats, nor barley). Good results are sometimes obtained by sowing lucerne with the ordinary wheat crop, but there is a big element of chance in such practice. Seed may be sown up to May with satisfactory re sults. If it cannot be sown before the end of May it should be held back for spring planting. Lucerne sown in au tumn should make satisfactory growth before the cold nights of winter check it, and should be...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 March 1913

WATER CONSERVATION & IRRIGATION COMMISSION OF NEW SOUTH WALES. MURRUMBIDGEE IRRIGATION AREAS. The Chance for Thousands of Soil-Tillers. The orchardistt dairyman, poul tryman, lamb-raiser; small-fruit grower, vegetable grower, tobacco grower, and general agriculturist has now the opportunity of his life to secure an irrigation farm composed of some of the richest soils on earth. No anxiety as regards drought. No hardships which usually beset the pioneer. Liberal State assistance. Practical Results from these lands under irrigation speak for them selves. This paper is published by the Commissioner for Irrigation as an instructive medium for settlers.

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Irrigation Record. Published Fortnightly under the authority of the Commissioner for Irrigation at Leeton, New South Wales, Australia. Address all communications to THE EDITOR, "Irrigation Record," Leeton, N.S.W. Evolution of a Great Irrigation Scheme. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 March 1913

Irrigation IRecorb, Published Fortnightly under the authority of the Commissioner for Irrigation at Leeton, New South Wales, Australia. ' Address all communications to THE EDITOR, " Irriga tion Record," Leeton, N.8.W. Evolution of a Great Irrigation Scheme. THE story of the evolving of the Mur rumbidgee Irrigation Scheme is an interesting chapter in the rural develop ment of New South Wales. Jhe lands of the Riverina acquired by graziers in the early days for producing merino wool became renowned for their fertility of soil and remarkable capacity for produc ing indigenous grasses.* In later years wheat growing in a section of this ter ritory, having a better average annual rainfall, has been carried on with varying success, governed by propitious seasons. It soon became manifest that fallowing the land, with the attendant moisture conservation through keeping the sur face cultivated, was the mainspring of economic crop production. Although a seeming paradox, there is a close relati...

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The New Town of Leeton. [Newspaper Article] — Irrigation Record — 15 March 1913

The New Town of Leeton. Oisr gently sloping ground, rising about sixty feet above the level of the surround ing farming lands, is the site of the new town of Leeton. The site is an ideal one. It is as if specially designed by nature for a town when it threw up this emi nence composed of gravel and soil above the fertile plains. The commerce of that portion of the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Areas known as Yanco must be centred in Leeton. A Settler's Tobacco Crop. (Murrumbidgee Irrigation Areas, Yanco.) The tobacco crops growing- on the Yanco section of the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Areas, prove the adaptability of the climate and soil for the production of tobacco under irrigation. The illustration shows a field of this valuable plant on the irrigation farm of Messrs. Bamber & Sharpies at Yanco. They are two English farmers. The time of planting was largely experimental the first year j but it is now evident that the best time to set out tobacco plants is in the middle of October....

Publication Title: Irrigation Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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