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Elephind.com contains 44,014 items from American Presbyterian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

I DWELL _AMOITGST _MISTE OWN PEOPLE." Touehingly beautiful is the answer of the Shunamite to the Prophet of the Lord. No courtly honor Would induce her to leave her own kindred. Many examples have we in the sacred Scriptures, expressive of the strong attachment of the Jews to kindred and country. A striking instance is recorded in 1 Kings, 11th chapter, where Hadad going to E gypt when young, and there received into great favor with the * king, hearing of the death of David and Joab, entreated Pharaoh to let him return to his own country; and when the king remonstrated with him, asking what he lacked to make him happy, he exclaimed, "Nothing! Howbeit, let me go in any wise." _Nehemiah is another example. When he hears of the desolation of Jerusalem , no earthly honor or gain would keep him from casting his lot with his suffering countrymen. And who has not read with feelings of emotion. the plaintive language of Jeremiah, " Weep not for the dead, neither bemoan them, but weep so...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

For the American Presbyterian. ANCIENT JERUSALEM AND SACRED PLACES, Messrs. EdctouSi—I hav .e obtained and examined the picture of Jerusalem and its vicinity, "_published by the American Sunday School Union. " It comes recommended by many gentlemen of learning, some of whom hare beett on the ground, and I supposed that I was securing for our Sunday School, Bible classes, and _lectures, a very accurate and reliable help to the study of the Scriptures. The view of the city of Jerusalem, the hills on which it stands—the two pools, and f alley of Gihon, with the sepulchres in its southern, rocky side—the valley of Jehoshaphat, with' one exception, are accurately and admirably represented. This part;of thefrpicture is worth the cost of the whole. Many other points of this most interesting section of the Holy Land are so exhibited as _^ at once to throw great light uponj the Bible narrative,_¥ and the descriptions of travellers. The effort is a commendable one, and _T. trust will be...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

wsSr yeae's ilp ifEma. The Buke of Weiiingtonauring the Peninsular War heard that a lar_^^ii giazine of wine lay on his line of _mUrchv«_3|^^feared inore for his men from barrelsi of wiillthan batteriesi of cannon, and instantly desi&tched a body of troops to; knock every wine|i|,rrel in the head. Cnristmas and New Yea|.%:e fear as much. Like him We cannot femuyar i;_Ke _€emptation Tr . shut the drain shop, arid ;_brM_| the whisky bottle~-but we are sure tbafcM&less you will be persuaded to avoid it, the/^^paching seasons _^_rfllDprpve fatal to, tbeJ_^jj0_Hft_^f_^-4his._^zir-: tne ot many. I ;At no o!H_^plson of Me year does our town present sigh_%|!o^|is._tfessing and so disgusting. Well may dpgtian¥ pray, and parents weep, and our _churches be hung in black There are more young men ajid_? young women ruined , more bad habits _aontlae:f,edj and mbue sbuls lost then, than in any otMr season of tne year.;.; ' ' _ ¦ ¦ : __ " ;;; W-. _"" . " " ' , . " We never s...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

RlMIMSOEirCES OF DE. BIECHEE. In duly, 18iJy-—if i have not forgotten- the year—I saw the Doctor for the first time at Marietta, Ohio. His coming had been looked for with great interest) and, personally, he was not what I supposed him to be a solemn-looking man. , with 'eye rolling in fine frenzy'.and other marks of genius. He was seen walking through that beautiful town with such an exhilaration as might be expected in a boy home _frbni school without any attempt at dignity. And-thenj too, he laughed outright in the public street, not boisterously, but quite merrily. -This was the famous Dr. Beechcr, quite a different _iperson from the one imagination conceived him to beV. ". . I Fas doomed to a greater disaippointjnent that evening,, when he preached a very dull sermon to a large audience, at least it _sieenied dull to me. He referred constantly to his notes, put on and. off life spectacles ludicrously often, and was not in a single particular the great thunderer I .expected...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

THE 1IEST ElVlVAL STEWS. , Messrs, Editors,—I send you a brief extract from a late number of the " AreHves du, Christianisme au XD£_'- Stecle," the oldest religious paper in _France, edited b y Rev, Dr. Frederic _IVfnnnfT _BELIGIOITS BEVIVAL. . It is with deep emotion that under the head "Domestic," we for the first time write ;the words r Religious Revival. We know that th_^re have been some manifestations of: an awakening in several places, but we had hitherto received no direofe intelligence, on the subject) and in such matters we are unwilling to speak from hearsay. Here, at last, is an abstract from a letter written by a Christian entitled to all confidence, who was himself a witness of and a partaker in the scenes that he relates ; his testimony is entirely trustworthy. We suppfess the names of places and persons_^ We pray G ; bd that that blessed experi-«ftce of th$ power .of prayer may not D8"i lost -amongst us, but that it may prove "the _firstrlruits of an abundant...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

i» SPEECHpSS MEMBEES. Christians who are not much gifted, as compared wifch_'.some of their brethren, are apt to feel _as» If it was of no consequence if they should be wanting in their .very subordinate part of the common charge. They seem to themselves very insignificant in the church. They seldom " take part in the social meetings and then quite briefly. They cannot "pray like a minister," as certain of the brethren are reputed able to do, nor make exhortations that are " 'most as good as preaching," and so, though they love to be at the place of prayer, and join _%eir - _voices _^£u-_^theVpi_^%1S glng the songs of 5_$ion, they think _that nothing important can depend upon their very _slendetr*fi6.iitribution to. the church's work. Perhaps _theip_^elt insignificance is thus made a tcnapfcatiorti to _^ negligence. But our Saviour has ho superfliipiis members in his Body. The Spirit confers1 jib' superfluous gifts. Fidelity of the humblest sort is valued by the Master, and is...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

GOB iSLOW TO _AWCKEIfc _^ . "He exeeutetb/not judgment speedily against the_,_wpi_±ers:ofriniqui^/' He ;does punish ; he shall punish; with.reverence be it spoken, he must punish. Yet no hand of clock goes so slow as God's hand of vengeance: Of that, the world, this _cityi and this _churchy are witnesses; each and all, speaker and hearer, are living witnesses. It is too common to .overlook this fact; and, overlooking the kindness, lpng: suffering, and warnin gs which precede * t_^e_;p Mishmentwe are_^ _tbo apt to give iEe_^pimisKm_^n_^_Sei_^dur exclusive attention. We see his kindness impressed on all his works. Even the lion growls before he leaps, and before the snake strikes she, springs her rattle. , Look, for example, on the catastrophe of the Deluge. We may have our attention so engrossed by the dread and awful character of this judgment, as to overlook all that preceded it, and see nothing but these devouring: waters. The waters rise till rivers swell into, lake 1 ?, and ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

_WHiHore. There is a class of persons in this world, by no means small, whose prominent peculiarity is whining. They whine because they are poor, or if rich, because they have no health to enjoy their riches; they whine because it is too shiny; they whine because it is too rainy; they whine because they have " no luck," and others' prosperity exceeds theirs ; they whine because some friends have diell and they are still living; they whine because they have aches and pains, and have aches and pains because they whine, and they whine no one can tell why. Now I would like to say a word to these whining persons. First. Stop whining! It is of no use—this everlasting complaining, fretting, scolding, faultfinding, and whining. Why, you are the most deluded set of creatures that ever lived. Did you not know that it is a well-settled principle of physiology and common sense, that these habits are more exhaustive of nervous vitality than almost any other violation of physiological law ?...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

BED-EIDDEir FOE TWEHTY-SIX _YEAES ; Let those who complain about the minor ills they suffer, read^^efollbvring, which we copy from the Orieans _American :-— On the 7th.I||alled to see and .speak with Henry Passen, who is, and has been afflicted with rheumatism as probably no other person has been since the world.began. -He has been confined .to his bed _sinca the spring of 1834, and has not helped himself from _^ it since the fall of the same year, * now _^ more than a; quarter of a century. Most of this time he has-been as helpless as an infant, not being able to turn himself in bed or help himself to a morsel of food. His knees have been out ot * joint for many years, the cords and muscles having contracted so as to draw the lower bones of the leg back under the femur or upper bone, from one to three inches. His feet have been drawn so as, to bring his toes against the shin bone or tibia, with such force as to cause painful and offensive sores. His hands are drawn out of their n...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

_^ WORE: FOE _LAYMEITi _, The timo was, i_%J_^any of our _churches, when the minister was expected to _dpieverjsthing_, that was needed for supplying the spiritual wants and advancing the spiritual interests of the congregation; and when it was considered a special privilege, if he could find even one or two of his session who were willing to lead in prayer at the weekly meeting, or to visit the sick for the purpose of ministering to their spiritual wants. We sincerely hope that these days are past, forever past, for our church; and that the lay portion of the church will now reeeive such a baptism of devotion and zeal in the cause of Christ, that they will henceforth be not only Aarons and Hurs to sustain the hands and cheer the hearts of the ministry, but like Joshua and Caleb, having themselves been permitted to have some glimpses of the true Canaan, arid having tested of its delicious fruits, they will be eloquent and earnest in commending it to others, and in urging them to p...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

THE S1EF AKD THE TJJrSEEH. uonsider how, with all their glare and _slioW, things seen are paltry, passing, the least of things; and that .grandeur and endurance belong to the unseen. The soul is unseen; precious jewel of immortality, it lies concealed within its fragile flfesliy casket. Hell and heaven are unseen; the first sinks beneath our sight; .the second rises high above it. The eternal world is unseet;; a veil impenetrable hangs before its mysteries, hiding them from the keenest eye. Death is unseen; he strikes his blow in the dark. The devil is unseen—stealing on us-often unsuspected, and always invisible. And as is our deadliest foe, so is our best and trusties*;, our heavenly friend. Jesus is an invisible Saviour; Jehovah is an invisible God. "No man hath seen God at any time;" yet why should that be turned into a temptation to sin ? T tliinlrif. _ehnnlil rather _.minister tn onnsfr_._finfc watchfulness, and holy-care. How solemn the thought, that an invisible bein...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

_SILEIfCl _JST _STATUTE. It is a remarkable and very instructive fact.that many of the most important operations qjf n_^iure are _^ carried on in an unbroken silence. -There is no_^_ushing sound when the broad tide of sunlight breaks on a dark world and floods it with glory, as one bright wave after another falls from the fountain, millions of miles aw _* ay. There is _np creaking of- heavy axles.or groaning of- cumbrous machinery, as the solid earth wheels on its-Way, and every planet and system performs its revolutions. The ' great trees bring forth their boughs and shadow the earth beneath them—the plants cover themselves with budsand the buds burst into flbwers; hot the whole'*trarisaction is-unheard. The change from snow and winter winds to the blossoms and fruits and sunshine of summer, is seen in ite slow development, but there is scarcely a sound to tell of the mighty transformation. . The solemn chant of the ocean, as it raises its unchanged and unceasing voice, the r...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

AN IMPOSSIBILITY. They mistake our design who fancy that the hermit's cell and the monk's cloister are p laces in which society is shunned. Man finds not in himself the end of his own existence. Beading, meditation, and prayer tend, doubtless, to unfold the individual faculties ; and if each were an isolated being, standing alone in his. relation to the Supreme, such self-development would be life's ultimate object. But that is not so. Humanity is one vast whole, struggling to elevate itself to perfection; and the incessant movement of the ocean is not more essential to the purity of its waters, than is social activity to r liuman advancement. Put an end to the attrition of mind on mind, let there be no con"flict of thought , no wrestling for mastery, no mutuality of help and dependence, no attraction and repulsion , love or hatred, and the stagnant world would become an abyss of-pollution. ?<T: uen separation from the world is impossible?" observed Oeolfrid, turning an inq...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

§0$tfg* THE JOYS OP HEAVEN " Eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, " What joys the Father hath prepared, For those who love His holy word, And in His saving grace have shared! « The heart of man " hath not " conceived" The blessedness reserved for those Who in the Saviour ' s name believe, And are redeemed from endless woes! Priceless, beyond all price, they are, Richer than richest gem of earth, Brighter than heaven ' s brightest star, Pure and immortal in their birth! Lo rd* grant that we may taste those joys! May rise to that sublime abode! And, freed from earth's distracting noise, May dwell for ever with our God! Then wilt we join the sainted choir, ' In praising God for sins forgiven; " 4>0d raise the halleluiahs higher.. ~ _Thatlwimih4 _flfliy toum of _hlafeHT" W. H.v <—-—— - <«?»»»• >-

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

- . _-*_iAiTT,_^-i,_*^ " ¦ •¦ ¦ .. - ¦¦ ' ' ¦ • . • ¦ _^ .:. -- ' _^_fe_*_'^* ¦ ¦" ¦ •'' ¦ ' MiNiSTBRsiN CAtiFORN_^ ^*Th%e are at present , (says the Pacific_^ %e_|qngpg to the Old School Presbyterians in this _Stplyfifteen ministers, eleven having eongregationsior churches under their charge. Of New School Presbyterian_^, there are twelve; two of them are absent from the State, the rest at work preaching tne gospel in it. Congfegationalists number seventeen ministers; two temporarily absent. Of the_^ number fourteen are either permanently or; _temporaril y engaged in preaching! In the 01d School Church, we know of but one minister settled as pastor; New School _twd_) Congregational three. Out of forty-four minsters, there are twenty-fiv| directly engaged 1 ija preaching; of these, only six are settled pastors. These thirty-five have under their care, as nearly as we can ascertain , fifty-two churches and congregations.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

Moravian Missions— _^Their operations have been greatly extended within the last thirty-five years. In; 1822 they; had 33 stations, to which were attached congregations amounting to 30,000 souls, under the care of 168 laborers, male and female. At present the number of stations is 73. The congregations connected with these number in all 74,187, of whom 21,000 are communicants. Tne number of baptized children is 20,000, almost all of whom are in attendance at school, ; Of male and female agents there. are in . ajl 304* From the _commencement there have been 1; _M_(1 persons en_7 gaged in the _^Qciefy's labors.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

OUR COUNTRY AT THE BEGINNING OF THE YEAR 1880. The prosperity of a nation depends on other things than political movements, and is not materially affected by the purposes and strifes of political parties. Thus far in our own history it has mattered little in regard to our progress as a people what party has been in the ascendant, or who has been at the head of the nation. Incompetent civil rulers we have had ; unwise and wicked measures have been precipitated upon the nation; unjust wars have been waged ; and unrig hteous laws have been enacted) but the nation has prospered notwithstanding all these, and apparently without being materially affected by any or all of these considerations. The prosperity of the nation is laid in the sober industry and virtu&of the people; in the general prevalence of education; in the richness of the soil, and in th_$ minerals of the earth jf in our broad and fertile fields inviting to cultivation; in our lakes and navigable, streams| in ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

EDITOR'S TABLE. M1SSIANIC PROPHECY AND THE LIFE OP CHRIST. By William S. Kennedy. Hew York: Published by A. S. Barnes & Burr, 1860. 12mo., pp. 484. For sale by J. B. Lippineott & Co. This volume is adapted to popular use, and is of great practical value. It exhibits first the Messiah as delineated in the prophecies of the Old Testament, in chronological order, and then historically, as manifest in his life, and re-?J?_I _ded in the New Testament. Christ is the centre and subjitanee of o,ur religion. *;Correct v_^s_^ of liim in his _essential character and relation to US as"irii!Br»1iJta_7"TnraB_^ foundation of hope. The God-man, in his twofold relation to the Godhead and to humanity reveals in himself the only possible means of reconciliation to God, the only accessible path to heaven. Christ, our Redeemer, our advocate, our intercessor, opens to man the doors of the heavenly world, and fits him for its enjoyment. The author of this volume shows that Christ is ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

tne THE _UHW YEAK. as tne eartn pursues ner journey, as sun describes'his circuit, as the seasons alternately follow each _otheriwittiout cessation, time glides along without hiking in its course, and our fears are spent as a tale when it is told. As the rivers flow toward the sea, so the blood courses in the veins, hurrying us imperceptibly onward to life's term_^jnas. Morning and evening, weeks, montns arid years, are natural waymarks, by which _wjteeasure our progress. We rejoice at the d_^M_^j_^_UJTew Year, as if tired of _tl_^e mo _hbtony_^f _ipe_^ia _^ still' , in the midst of our greetings and ehep we are movingibrward, and leave the annual Bdjiday behind us. Thus is human life. It is a continual movement toward eternity. Men are as busy, bustling and active today, as yesterday ) and this year as last, and this generation as th_^_ljpreeeding one, for there is no cessation in the s||eam, no apparent change on the surface of soejety. As the front and vete ran ranks thin...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 5 January 1860

"AKHALS OF THE POOR." THE _StJNDAY SCHOOL. It is but ri ght that the results of our efforts should be fairly stated now and then for the information especially of such as have aided us constantly from the beginning. Some account of the Sunday School will best illustrate them. It is now eight weeks since its first formation , commencing with nine scholars and one teacher. It is, and has been , and will continue to be, an inflexible rule to draw no scholars connected with any other school. This number has gradually increased to about fifty-five, and the teachers now number ei gfit, most of them coming from so great a distance as to render it scarcely possible for them to attend regularly. About two-thirds of the scholars are boys, and the school ranges along from four to sixteen years. About one-third can read tolerably well, and nearly all have at some time been in a Sunday School. The almost universal reason assigned for their non-attendance hitherto , is the want of suitable ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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