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Elephind.com contains 457,205 items from Cambridge Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

The Cambridge Chronicle. VOLUME I. CAMBRIDGE, THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1846. NUMBER 1. PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY ANDREW REID, At his office, corner of Main and Magazine Streets, over the store of Mr. Joseph A. Holmes, Cambridgeport. TERMS—$2.00 per annum, payable in advance. Adverisements, not exceeding 10 lines, FIFTY CENTS for the first, and twenty cents for every subsequent insertion: those of greater length charged in proportion. A liberal discount to those who advertise by the month or year. BOSTON ADVERTISEMENTS. THE CHRONICLE. THE CAMBRIDGE CHRONICLE THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1846. CAMBRIDGE.

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE YANKEE ZINCALI. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

THE YANKEE ZINCALI. "Here's to budgets, packs and wallets! Here's to all the wandering train!" -Burns I confess it, I am keenly susceptible of "skyey influences." I profess no indifference to the movements of that capricious old gentleman known as the Clerk of the Weather. I cannot conceal my interest in the behavior of that patriarchal bird whose wooden similitude gryrates on the church spire. Winter proper is well enough. Let the thermometer go to zero if it will ; so much the better, if thereby the winds are frozen, and unable to flap their stiff wings. Sounds of bells in the keen air, clear, musical, heart-inspiring - quick tripping of fair moccasined feet on glittering ice pavements —bright eyes. glancing above the uplifted muff, like a Sultana's behind the folds of her yashmack— school-boys coasting down street like mad Green land...(-.- c,brillance of oblique sunbeams, flashing back from wide surfaces of glittering snow, or blazing upon ice jewelry of true and roof! There is ...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
[From the Ladies' Repository.] THE HORRORS. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

[From the Ladies' Repository.] THE HORRORS. DEAR FRIEND: - "I wonder, " said a good lady the other day, when speaking of you, "if the doctor can't tell us what is good for the horrors." As you never have this troublesome complaint, you can probably give us something theoretically on this subject. W. J. The term "horrors," we suppose, our correspondent uses in the generic sense, comprehending all grades of mental depression, from "brown study" to tedium vita. If so, he pays us too high a compliment in supposing that we are wholly exempt from the disorder. We would not have done so, if he had seen as the other day, when a gentleman stepped up in us and said, "Stranger, ain't! you troubled with dyspepsuary?" We are not aware that the disease in question is hereditary. However, the lass of sallow complexion, spare habit, and dark eyes should be on her guard. At the request of our friend, we make a few observations on the causes and cure of the affection. Its Causes. 1. Disease, particul...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

In Memory of Washington - An incident occurred last week on board the boat Powhatan, Capt. Rogers, worthy of note. The boat runs upon the Potomac, on the Washington and Richmond line, and always rings the bell as she passes Mount Vernon, in honor of the illustrious dead whose mortal remains are entombed there. On the occasion mentioned, the Harmoneon singers (Bostonians) were on board, and the boat stopped opposite Washington's grave, while they sang the melody, "Washington's Grave," in so touching a manner, the whole company standing recovered, as to bring tears to the eyes of most on board. VOTES FOR THE CUMBERLAND ROAD - A story is told of Mr. Van Buren, that, while on a tour through the West in 1840, he was upset in a stage coach, and as he stood up to his knees in mud, and asked the driver how the incident happened, was told by that personage that he had already upset eleven members of Congress, and by so doing he received the votes of every one of them for appropriations to th...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
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Page 1 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

Entertainments, Chinese Museum - IN THE BUILDING KNOWN AN THE Marlboro Chapel, Washington street. This large and splendid collection, consisting of upwards of 60 figures as large as life, more than 400 paintings by Chinese artists; numerous models of Temples, Houses, Vessels, &c; specimens of manufactures, musical instru- ments, exquisite carvings, curious and splendid lanterns. &c, &c.; together with occasional playing on Chinese in- struments, and singing, by one of the Chinese attached to the Museum - is exhibiting every day, from 9 A.M. till 10 P.M. Admittance 50 cents; Children under 12 years of age, half-price. Season tickets, good for three months. $2. PIANO FORTES WILKERSON & COY, Manufactury and Ware Rooms, No. 185 Washington street, (opposite the Washington Coffee House, respectfully invite the public generally, and all lovers of music especially, to call at their Ware Rooms and examine their instruments which have acquired t...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CAMBRIDGE CHRONICLE. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

CAMBRIDGE CHRONICLE. The publisher of this paper, which now makes its first appearance, instead of choosing a far-fetched name, has adopted one which, though less common than it formerly was, is still familiar. It is sufficiently appropriate and comprehensive, and, if not suited to every one's taste, it will soon be regarded by the reader as a matter of small moment in comparison with the skill required of the chronicler, and the worth of the matter chronicled. A newspaper is truly, to a considerable extent, a chronicle of the times; and not only by its more solemn records of political, civil and ecclesiastical affairs, of social progress, and of the advancement of education—but also by the collection of incidents which for the time seem to be of little import, and by casual allusions to contemporaneous manners, habits and customs, it gives such a portraiture of the age, as may excite the curious gaze of one and another in after generations. It is difficult for the conductor of a ne...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

The Publisher has but little to say in addition to what has been mentioned by our worthy Editor. He would merely suggest, that all who feel interested in the welfare of our new city, ought, as a matter of course, to support a newspaper in their midst, especially as it is designed to be liberal and charitable on all subjects. We intend to make it, emphatically, the people's paper ; and wlhle we [the editor] speak to you, through its columns, won't you just speak to us in return. Yes, subscribe, advertise— pay in advance —and then— write communications. [The Publisher is a very bashful man—very.] Mr. T. Work will deliver the Chronicle in Wards 1 and 2 ; and Mr. — STRATTON will act as General Agent, and procure subscriptions in Cambridge and the adjoining towns. The terms are $2.00 per annum, payable in advance. Any person forwarding $6.00 to this office, shall receive four copies of the Chronicle, sent to his address. The Chronicle will be published every Thursday, at the office over ...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
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THE CITY OF CAMBRIDGE. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

THE CITY OF CAMBRIDGE. At the beginning of the present century Cambridge contained 2453 inhabitants. It then embraced Little Cambridge [now the town of Brighton], and Menotomy [now the town of West Cambridge], About 1200 inhabitants probably dwelt at that time within the present limits of the town, and a majority of this number within half a mile of the college buildings. At a period a little more remote, and prior to the building of West Boston Bridge in 1794, it was a retired village wearing more the appearance of decay than of progress. After the completion of the bridge, several enterprising men commenced and pursued a successful trade in the easterly part of what has since been called Cambidgeport. In the course of eight or nine years a fever of speculation began to rage. A corporation was formed which began to monopolize the land to lay out streets, and to build houses on pieces of ground so unsuitable to dwell upon that they soon became tenantless. Several years before the wa...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
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HANCOCK FREE BRIDGE. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

HANCOCK FREE BRIDGE. The act of the General Court, passed at its last session, establishing the Hancock Free Brdge Corportation, is, with some important modifications, a revival of the act of 1836, and of the act in addition thereto of 1837; the first of which authorized the building of a bridge over Charles River, from a point at or near the northwesterly end of Charles street, in Boston, to some convenient point between West Boston Bridge and Canal Bridge in Cambridge. It was provided however, that, if the West Boston Bridge Corporation should, on or before the first day of June following, agree to sell their bridge and the franchise thereof to the Hancock Corporation, for such sum as three disinterested persons should appraise the same to be worth, the section empowering this corporation build a bridge should be void. In case of the transfer of the West Boston Bridge, it was to be free from toll and to be maintained by the new corporation. The bridge and franchise were appraised ...

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Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
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THE SEASON. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

THE SEASON. The progress of Spring and approach of Summer, though not without sudden changes of temperature, has been more than ordinarily uniform. In a garden at Pine Grove, the most southerly part of Cambridge, an Apricot tree, sheltered by a building from northerly winds, began to blossom on the 13th of April. In the open ground, exposed to the winds from every quarter, the Apricot begin to blossom on the 21st of April. Peach " " 21st " Plum " " 24th " Pear " " 30th " Asparagus, in a bed prepared five years since, was cut on the 24th. In a bed of two and three years growth from the seed, not transplanted, spires were cut on the 20th. These were produced on sandy loam. On such a soil, or any loam well pulverised, we are inclined to think that asparagus can be raised as succussfully and more profitably from the seed sown in rows and dropped at sufficient distances from each other, than by transplanting, which must necessarily check in some degree the growth. If the rows are placed ...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
STEAMER CAMBRIA. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

STEAMER CAMBRIA. The steamer Cambria, Capt. Judkins, sailed from Liverpool on the 19th ult., at 4 P. M., with about 100 passengs. She arrived at Halifax on the 1st inst., at noon, and sailed again at 4 P. M. She left 20 passengers at Halifax, and took others for Boston. On Saturday night about midnight, while running at full speed, and just as the engine had been stopped for the purpose of sounding, the Cambria touched the shore, it being at the time very thick and foggy. An anchor was got out, but it did not hold. About 4 A.M. on Sunday, communication was had with the shore, and it was ascertained that the ship was about five miles from the Highland light, on Cape Cod, about fourteen miles south of Race Point. The tide was about half flood when she went on, and by morning she had swung round so as to lie broadside on, and heading to the south, and canted a little. Two passangers., Mr. George B. Blake of Boston, and Capt. Chester of England, came on shore in the morning and look hor...

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ARRIVAL OF THE CAMBRIA. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

ARRIVAL OF THE CAMBRIA. The Cambria arrived on Tuesday morning, having got afloat by the aid of the steamer R. B. Forbes, at 5 1/2 o'clock the evening previous. The R. B. Forbes, which left Boston about 12 o'clock on Sunday night, made the breakers during a thick fog off Peaked Hill Bar, at daylight Monday morning - kept along the edge of the breakers and discovered the Cambria at 7 1/2 o'clock, head off shore and within 200 yards of the beach. She dropped a large anchor, and backed it with the stream anchor, bent on the large cable and carried it aboard the Cambria. At half past four o'clock both vessels were put under full steam. the R. B. Forbes heaving at the windlass. At half-past five the Cambria was hove off with three cheers. The Cambria appears none the worse for having rested a day or two on the sands of Cape Cod. Mr. Frazer, the 1st officer, and six men in the life boat were capsized in getting out the first anchor on Sunday morning, and nearly drowned. The assistant stew...

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Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

PICKPOCKETS.—These expert rogues succeeded in abstracting six pocket books, at the inauguration in Cambridge, on Thursday Iast.

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
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OREGON. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

OREGON. Whatever may be the final issue of the controversy between our government and that of Great Britain concerning the Oregon territory, it is gratifying to find that instead of being made strictly a party question, it is discussed in Congress and among the people, to some extent at least, upon its true merits. Distinguished men in Congress have leaped over the party lines which were drawn by a fragment of the Baltimore Convention, and many of the people who voted for the candidate nominated by that convention for the presidency, solely under the delusive charm of the word, democracy and democratic, now choose to think for themselves, and begin seriously to doubt whether those are the exclusive patriots, who "Supply with vaporing and rauting, That which in real value's wanting." The president of tho United States instead of going through a careful process of philosophical induction concerning the wishes and expectations of that portion of the people who elected him to office, se...

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CONGRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

CONGRESS. The great question concerning Oregon being disposed of by the passage of the resolution which authorizes the president, at his discretion, to give notice to Great Britain of the termination of the convention, several interesting subjects have come up for consideration. The sub-treasury bill, which was acted upon and which passed through its several stages with such haste in the House of Representatives, is still in the hands of the Committee of Finance in the Senate. The reply of the chairman of this committee to the questions of Mr. Webster, from which it appears that the committee will recommend that the act shall go into operation on the first of Jan., 1847, instead of the first of July, 1846, disarms it in a measure of its terrors, and gives fair warning to those who are engaged in commercial pursuits to prepare for the change. French Spoliations. —A bill appropriating five millions of dollars towards claims against the governnent on account of French spoliations previ...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
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INUGURATION OF THE PRESIDENT OF HARVARD COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

INUGURATION OF THE PRESIDENT OF HARVARD COLLEGE. The Inauguration of Hon. Edward Everett, L. D., as president of Harvard College, took place on Thursday last, with appropriate ceremony, in the First Church at Cambridge. The Invited Guests and other persons designated in the order of procession, assembled at Gore Hall at 10 o'clock, and at 11 o'clock a Procession was performed in the following order : Under graduates in the order of Classes Resident Graduates and members of the Law and Divinity Schools. Librarian, wilh the College Seal and Charter. Steard, with the College Keys Members of the Corporation. Professors and all other officers of Instruction and (Government in the University. Ex-President Quincy and former members of the Corporation. Ex-Professors Sheriffs of Suffolk and Middlesex. His Excellency the Governor and the President elect. The Governor's Aids. His Honor the Lieutenant Governor and the Adjutant General. The Honorable and Reverend Overseers. Trustees of the Hopki...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
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ORGANIZATION OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

ORGANIZATION OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT. The members elect of the City Governmenl assembled at the City Hall on Monday, May 4th, at 10 o'clock, A. M., agreeably to pruevious notice given by the Selectmen. In the Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Messrs. Batchelder and Buttrick were appointed a committee to examine the credentials of the Mayor and Aldermen, as certified by the Selectmen of Cambridge, and the gentlemen before named were found to be elected to those oflices. A message was sent from the Common Council to the Mayor and Aldermen, informing this Board that a quorum of the Council was present and ready to be qualified, and proposing a convention for this purpose. In Convention the Clerk of the Selectmen announced the purpose of the convention, and prayer was offered by the Rev. Wm. A. Sterns. The oath of offlce was then administered to the Mayor by the Hon. Samuel P. P. Fay, Judge of Probte; and by the Mayor to the Aldermen and members of the Common Council. The Mayor then delivered...

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MAYOR'S ADDRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

MAYOR'S ADDRESS. Gentlemen of the Common Council, On this occasion of the first organization of a City Government for Cambridge, it seems appropriate to advert briefly to the nature of the change we have made in our form of government, and the reasons which have led us to it. We may thus be enabled to appreciate more justly the interests confided to our care, and to understand and perform our duties better. Under a town organization, all the business, which appertains to the interest of the people, and is subject to municipal regulation, is transacted immediately by the people themselves, i. e. by those who are legallly qualified to vote, assembled in general town meeting. They exercise for themselves immediately, without delegating it to others, the right to deliberate and decide. They constitute the legislative department, and choose Selectmen and others to act for them as executive officers. Such, in brief, is the theory of a town government. It is the simplest form; the most pur...

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Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
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Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Chronicle — 7 May 1846

The convention disolved and the Common Council met and elected Hon. Isaac Livermore President, and Charles S. Newell Clerk. The President then addressed the Council as follows: Gentlemen of the Common Council:— you the honor you have conferred upon me, in ****** with entire unanimity to preside over your ******* I tender to you my sincere and heartfelt ***** reassure you that no endeavors shall be *********** so to discharge the duties of the office ******* not prove wholly unworthy of the confidence ****reposed in me. Gentlemen, - We are ****** new and untried duties. The change *********in the mode of administering our municipality ****** of vast importance, and its results cannot ***** seen of foretold. There are many of our citizens who have looked upon this change with unpropitious forebodings, and it therefore becomes each and all who are to take part in the management of the concerns of our new City, to persue such a course of measures, as shall tend to rernove all fears and ...

Publication Title: Cambridge Chronicle
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
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