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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

P""""""a" WW""" ' '"," Jj'aM "wt"! r mn wii "iwffjai'""'fiwi"" h,wmm .npr" .iiMw.i.wppw, pJHj i The Indian Advocate I'M s ) i 3 Jl t Devoted to the interests of Indian Missions. Vol. V. JANUARY 1893, No. 1. Notes and Remnrks. The Right Rev. Bishop will be at Sacred Heart on New Year's for the two-fold purpose of giving the sweet veil of the Order of the Mercy to several young ladies, and of administering the Sacrament of Confirmation to a certain number of school children and Indians. The Right Rev. Bishop dedicated a new church at Ilennessy on the 13th of November. The new church is a credit to the earnest zeal of Rev. Father Beck. Among the now settlors of the Iowa and Sac and Fox reserves there are over four hundred Catholics, whilst you find only about one hundred in Pottawato mie County. Still most of our new settler, are good, quiet and honest neighbors. Many of them have never been inside a Catholic Church, coming from Northern Texas, Arkansas or Chickasaw Nation. We trust th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

rvv w IP'rilnwSrvpSs T.H77 INDIAN ADVOCATE. deduct all the non-Christian elemonts, Jews, Mormons, savages and avowed infidels, and there will very probably not remain fifty millions of the non Catholic population openly recognizing the divinity of Christ. This country is the only break in the universal Catholicity of the New World. But remember the wonderful history of Catholic conquest in the United States during the century just elapsed. At its beginning there was one Catholic for every hundred of population. At its close there is one for every six or seven persons. Hard Work Crowned With Success Indian Boarding-School Dedicated Father Isidore's Letter. Rev. Father Isidore Ricklin, 0. S. B., who has devoted his untiring energies for the benefit of the Comanche Indians for over a year,, beholds now his work crowned with success. The new school for the Kiowa and Comanche Indians was dedicated on November 11th. I C30 not refrain from giving an extract of the good Father's letter, hur...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

tynpift'H HPJPB f1 Pl 'VHf,wy " ?; TJT.E INDIAN ADVOCATE. 3 t?. ft older said: "Well, my friends, T met the Bishop last evening; he seems to bo a very nice man; I don't think it will hurt us to go to the Catholic church to day." So they all went to the Catholic church. From Bjiifttula tfhe Bishop visited the Senecas aid Quapaws, for whom he said Mass and lectured nt different places; at one of which he waited till after tweTve for the Indians who were coming in great numbers. His patience was awarded by seeing two hundred children off the forest assembled to assist at the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, and to listen with pleasure to a forcible in struction, "which ho gave them on "The Necessity of Religion." To several of these he administered the Sacrament of Confirmation! Then the "Bishop lectured several nights at Muscogee, Lehigh, Conlgate, and Krebs,- mining towns in Creek na tion and Choctaw nation; everywhere he was honored by large attendances who attentively listened to the wo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

IJJWWJPppwr? 'wpwrr T "? THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ft ? m& He pjV ri at Stonewall, but on this as on pre vious occasions, the travelers wore cordially welcomed and kindly enter tained by Mr. Cochran and his nice family. This big-hearted and well-informed gentleman, one of the most influenoial of the place, has always been the friend of the missionary priest, and has taken great pleasure in enter taining them, whenever they would pass on their long tedious drives. Saturday morning the little party left en route for Sacred Heart, the last thirty-five miles of their long trip. The low land road? had been rendered very heavy by the big rains, so when they had made the first ten miles, one of the ponies took sick and could go no further. Happily they met a farmer from the neighborhood, who took them to his place. They could not hire a horse for he had only a couple of them for his work, but he had an old pony, which had been left with him for sale; but sold it must be, not hired! Tt was S...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

fw'''pyw'rvwwinrvrr':y f"tuft ywn THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. tlie Right Rev. Bishop and the driver found themselves in the soft mud. For tunately no bones were broken; only the top of the buggy was gone, and in stead the travelers had received a new coat: ''of mud." The Bishop took it with his usual jovial humor; this was the crowning incident of his six long weeks traveling through a rough territory. DEDICATION OF A NEW CHURCH. For over a year many busy hands have been at work at Sacred Heart on the building of a new church, as tho former chapel was entirely too small for the great numbers that Hocked to it., especially on great festivals. It caused great pain to the heart of the good Su perior of the Benedictine Fathers to see so many people, some coming from a distance of twenty or twenty-live miles, not able to enter the church for want of room, but obliged to remain outside during the services. Therefore it has been his' greatest desire for several years past, to have a church erecte...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Returning to the front of tho church the procession entered, and advanced up the main aisle to tho high altar, singing the Litany of the Saints. The walls -wore then blessed inside. MASS. The ceremony of dedication being over, the Bishop, attended by his min isters, clothed himself in his Pontifical vestments, in order to sing Pontifical High Mass. The oflicers of the Mass were as follows: Assistant Priest, Rev. Fr. Athanasius, 0. S. F., Vicar-General to Bishop Hen essey of Wichita; Deacons of Honor, Rev. Fr. Fornelli, 0. S. B., of Mc Alister, and Rev. Fr. Willibrord, 0. S. B., of Edmund; Deacon of Mass, Rev. Fr. Felix, 0. S. B., of Guthrie; Sub Deacon, Rev. Fr. Hilary, 0. S. B., of Oklahoma City; Masters of Ceremonies, Rev. Fr. Germanus, 0. S. B., the "little giant" of El Reno, and Br. Joa chim, 0. S. B.; Censer-Bearer, Br. Eliseus; Crosier-Bearer, Br. Stanislaus; Mitre -Bearer, Br. Benedict; Trail Bearer, Br. Lawrence; Book-Bearer, Br. Timothy; Candle-Bearer, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the King's daughter, "till its glory is within." Tho inside is plastered, and is adorned with several artistically ar ranged arches. The sanctuary is espe cially beautiful, and the choir is a truly monastic one, supplied with forty-two stalls. An oil-painting of St. Benedict with his two most beloved disciples, St. Maurus and St. Placidus, is to hang over ono side of the choir, and one of Our Lady, Queen of Monks, over the other. The altar railing is very ele gant, and shows the genius of the architect. "What is now wanting to the new structure, and which will be the next care of the good Superior, is a bell and an altar. Tho present altar is only temporary. As soon as circumstances and means will permit, Rev. Fr. Su perior will have a new one, more suit able for the size and the beauty of the building it must adorn. As for a bell, he has the tower, but the boll is yet wanting, and the monastery bell will have to supply the deficiency, till he has means wherewit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

8 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. trodden first by our forefathers in the Faith, said he, and over 50 millions of Catholics in the three Americas rise up to-day and bless the name of Columbus, the Christ-bearer. In the afternoon the children of the schools gave appropriate entertain ments, and a solemn benediction closed the day. m. M. Fui:iisTr..viii:it, A. 0. S. B. COLUMBUS DAY PRO-GUAM. Music Clayton's Grand March. Raising and saluting the Flag. . ..By all the pupils. Song "Speed our Republic." By all the pupils. Recitation "What Columbus did not have to learn when he was a boy By one of the pupils. Columbus Song By all the pupils. Address By one of the pupils. Music "God bless our Home." Recitation "The Ode" By one of the pupils. Music "The Angel's Harp." Drama "America, Spain, and Italy" By three young girls. Song "My Country 'tis of thee". .By all the pupils. SONG OF COLUMBUS DAY. OCTOBER 21, 1892. Contributed by the Youth's Companion. Am: "Lyons." Columbia, my land! all hail the glad fl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

THE INDIAN ADOVGATE. 0 U discourage them, and to induce thorn to return home. "But all in vain. The rain fell in torrents, creoks and rivers overrun; (Lehigh is sixty-five miles S. E. of Sacred Heart, and no less than five large creeks, and the treacherous Ca nadian are to he forded.) "To use their own language, "They stuck to their word." They promised to he there, and there they will and shall go, all the furies of hell notwith standing. And so they patiently awaited God's own good time. "It came al lust, after two and a half days expectation. Behold them now, moving slowly along in the muddy roads. The ponies give way, another standstill. One of their number is dis patched to Sacred Heiirt for a fresh team; after nearly six days wandering they reach at last their destination. Needless to say that they were warmly received by the Benedictine Monks, whose hospitality is proverbial. "The following day as true Christian Pilgrims, they thanked Almighty God for their safe arrival by ap...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

10 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Plot brought greater hardships upon the Catholics, and compelled many of the priests to retire from England. Among these was a certain Dom August ine Bradshaw, an Englishman, who had become a Benedictine monk in the great abbey of St. Martin, at Compostella, in Spain. In 1605 he conceived the idea of establishing Benedictine communi ties near to England, to be read' to serve on the English mission.' He therefore settled in the university town of Douai, situated in what was then a part of the Spanish Low Countries, and gathered together a few of his religious brethren, and accepted scholars for education. This was the beginning of St. Gregory's College. By the blessing of God the house flourished. It supplied many mission aries to England; of its members four shed their blood for the truth, while many suffered imprisonment; it took prominent part in the studies and teaching of the University of Douai, and it kept up a flourishing school for the education of th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 11 monks of Subiaco first settled in Kent. The Benedictine Order in England is numerous, and its houses, whether Abbeys, Priories, Colleges, or Mission stations, are flourishing with good promises of future development, under the blessing of God, and Patronage of the Patriarch of the monks of the Western Church. BUCK PAST ABBEY . A few words in regard to Buckfast Abbey will, no doubt, be of special in terest to the readers of the Advocate; because several of the Fathers working in the Indian Territory came from this place. And Buckfast is indebted, after God, to Rev. Thos. Duperon, present Prior of Sacred Heart Mission, for the return of Hie Benedictine monks, and the restoration of the old abbey. Buckfast is situated in Devonshire, about 60 miles N. E. of Plymouth. The foundation of Buckfast dates back to the tenth century. After a long period of prosperity and beneficence to the country, this abbey was dissolved with 26 other Benedictine houses of the country,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

m TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. mittoe organized by Dr. S. Or. Minart, numbering among its members Lord Clifford, Cardinals Manning and New man, tho Duke of Norfolk, the Earl of Denbigh, Arch Ullathoro, and many other bishops and lords. A neat stone church was built first; then the old Abbot's Tower was restored. Tho old foundations were discovered, and a magnificent structure was erected on very old foundations. The spiritual work kept pace with the material. From the beginning thi) novitiate and classes for the students in theology were regularly organized. Later on an Apostolic school, or Alumnate was established, which now numbers from 25 to 30 students. Rev. A. Hamilton opened a course of religious instruction for the children of the neighborhood , and lectured every Sunday. Crowds flocked to the little temporary chapel. The good seed has produced an abundant harvest. Within a circuit of five miles Rev. Fr. Hamilton found but three Cath olics; over 80 abjurations were received, and now ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. J$ Italy, France, Spain, Belgium, and England. The Italian province has eight houses, all in Ttaly; the French has also eight houses, including the Priory of Sacred Heart Mission; the English has one; the Belgium three; and tho Spanish four, with St. Benedict's in New Zealand. In ISSi) the Congregation numbered 2 Bishops; 7 Abbots; 1 Prefect-Apostolic; 202 Fatl ers; 94 Clerics: 125 Lay- brothers; 3 Oblatcs: Total 434. On October 22, the abbots and vis itors, or provincials of the said congre gation were admitted to a private audi ence by Leo XI LI. Right Rev. R. Flugi, the Abbot General, read an address to the Holy Father, in the name of the whole con gregation, and the Vicar of Christ showed them great kindness. He in quired of the stale and condition of the monasteries in the different nations, of the difficulties that the religious voca tions encounter nowadays, and of the number of monks. He spoke with enthusiasm of the golden age of the great order, wishing...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

u THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. I think of the words of St. Francis Xavier, 'What does it profit, etc.,'" he said, writing to his parents, "it seems to me that I still love this earth, not, however, for itself, but for the good one can do his follow men while here. How ardently, then, but the time has not come." The time of which he spoke did not long delay coming. After completing the studies at St. Bertin's which he began in the little Seminary of Arras, he returned to his parents. For a loving, delicate nature like his, family-life was replete with charms. But his soul heard the voice of the Church, oppressed in the person of Pius IX., and he could not resist its call. He went to Rome, and took his place among the defenders of the Pap acy. Other pupils of St. Bertin's had preceded him thither, the most note worthy of whom was Arthur Gullemin, the hero martyr of Castelhdardo and Montelibretti. On the oth of April, 1866, he wrote: "I did but obey the voice of conscience, and I daily con gra...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

yrlIE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 1! days at homo. For some time the solu tion of this affair has seemed to be approaching. The Garibaldians wish to come out, but evidently are in no hurry. Were they to come immediately, all would bo at an end; and each one could return home. These gentlemen undoubtedly fear us." The Garibaldians feared, indeed, those defenders of the Popacy, and, to overthrow them, resorted to shameful means. The history of that epoch is filled with their attempts to assassinate isolated soldiers. And to these attempts they added infernal machinations; as, the blowing up of the Soristery-barracks, which buried beneath their ruins almost the whole of the Zouave band. "Death to such cowards!" cried out Julius, "they murder you on the street corners, as they would vile beasts." This war of ambuscades, surprises, and treachery , so repugnant to French valor, rendered our young volunteers indignant. "A buttle in the bright sun-light would be a feast;" wrote Theodore Wibanse, "wore...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

16 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. oxpedition, and was but a few stops distant from him,. when a new wound throw him to the ground. The enemy immediately made him prisoner; and not until the following day did the French succeed in securing his release. Ho had received four wounds, one of which, breaking his thigh-bone, entered into the intestines, where it lodged. The wounded hero was carried to Homo, where he was placed in the hos pital of the Holy Ghost, attended by the Sisters of Charity; their Superior, Mother Lequett, sister of the Bishop of Arras, gave him the tcnderest care. Julius, making no allusion to the seri ousness of his wounds, begged Lieuten ant Leu, a former colleague, to inform his parents of the results of the battle; but first he desired to let them know that he had performed his religious duties before entering it. Mr. Poulct, former Superior of St. Bertin's, how ever, had notified that heroic little woman of her son's injuries, before the receipt of this letter. Her answe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

f-5 - THE .INDIAN ADVOCATE. 17 lie igei ofpargatory. HOW MANY HWKhT i:HMINICENChN THIS TITI.K KhCAM.S TO A C1IHI8TIAN MINI). THE ANGEL OF AGAR. This unfortunate mother was wander ing in the solitude of Bersabee. Both she and her son, Ismael, were in danger of dying from want of water.. She laid the boy in the shade of a bush, and not having courage enough to see him die, went off a short distance. TIere the unhappy woman moaned piteously, and cried out, "I shall not see my child die!" And, lo! an angel appeared to her who said, "Thy son is thirsty; be hold a fountain of water!" The mother took the child, and gave him to drink; and soon he came to life again. 0 weeping mothers, who have lost a beloved child, reflect well! This child of yours is burning perhaps with an excruciating thirst in the flames of pur gatory. Listen, therefore, to the voice of his angel who, pointing out to you the eucharistic (sacramental) fountain, says cxhortingly: "Draw from Holy (onimunion the living wate...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

18 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of the poor captives in their fiery dun geon, and leads them triumphantly into the celestial Jerusalem. st. cecily's angel. Like St. Cecily's, the Angel of Pur gatory will put on the heads of the liberated souls, golden crowns inter laced with roses and lilies, culled in the Garden of Paradise. THE ANGEL OF PUHGATOR V. if, according to' the testimony of Holy-Writ and the Fathers, each na tion, every church, each family have their Guardian-Angel, can it be doubted that Purgatory has its angel? He stnnds by these poor afflicted souls, consoles and encourages them in that ocean of woe and tortures, until finally he breaks those horrible chains. "I shall send my angel," says .God Himself, "not only that he may go before you on your way and protect you, but that he may lead you even into the place, which 1 have prepared for you." Let us have a great devotion to this angel, whose intercession can be so precious to our dear departed. THE ANGEL OF THE MISSIONS. I see...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 19 I PRAY FOR THE DEAD. Pray for the dead! Their prisoned houIh are yearning With love umncaHured for that happy day, When I'Mon's gates on pearly hinges turning .Shall woo to peace. Then pray, oh pray! Pray for the dead! On golden hinge. turning The eastern portals open to the day, While bell on hell peals out on wings of morning, "Ave Maria!" Pray, oh pray! Pray for the dead! While noon-tide chimes are ringing Once more by angel taught we "Aves" say, And tender thoughts are surely, gently bringing The longed for hour. Pray, oh pray! Pray for the dead! O'er hill and valley stealing The lengthened shadows tell of fading day, The last sweet "Aves" softly now are pealing Thro' sunset splendor. Pray, oh pray! Maky M. MiMjixi: in Poor Souls1 Advocate. Devotion to the Souls in Purgatory in the Benedictine Order. History abounds with instances show ing this devotion traditional among the children of St. Benedict. We read of St. Gregory the Great, that he had Mass said...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1893

20 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. and poor clothing, and he has given you decent and warm clothes; you had no home, and he has opened the doors of an asylum for you. Here your hands are employed in useful manual labor, whilst your intellect is cultivated by instruction and mental exercises, and mind and heart are trained in the path of truth and virtue. Then turning to ward you, the Heavenly Father directs your attention to the kind Sister of Charity: "Behold your mother," says He "cccc Mater tual" And, indeed, this Christian virgin lavishes ail the tender cares of a true mother upon you; her sweet look, her solacing and encouraging smile, her modest appear ance, her compassionate kindness have touched and won your young heart. No wonder, therefore, if, in a rapture of love and gratitude, you are forced to cry out: "My earthly parents have been taken from me, but our dear Lord has Himself taken me under His pro tection!" Still the poor orphan is always to be pitied; and he would be so by far ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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