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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

THE RANCH p£fy yeXr. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and Ihe Home in fhc N¥io West. VOL .1. NO. i. Prospects. Tub Ranch seeks to promote the mate rial interests of the newer West and the happiness and thrift of its people. Its methods evaporate the water and leave the meat. It isnon partisan. The editors don't know it all: they seek information from all sources for discussion on com mon ground in these columns. The Ranch shall be clean and wholesome from tip to tip. Let it speak for itself. Capital: not great capital in the hands of a few, but distributed among many, is the great need of all new states. A thou sand men with $500 to $1,000 each will ao Washington infinitely more good make for progress and development a hundredfold faster than a score of capit alists with a million apiece. The thou sand make business for the transportation companies, make trade for the merchants, occupy the land, develop our agriculture and the lesser industries with a speed that great capital in few ha...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

2 high the Puget Sounders will bring it down. They report free inquiry from eastern buyers. Shipments east have shown a marked increase in the past few months. Australia ami China business ia improving and this will increase their lumber demand. Flour has be^n little used in China, but low prices here en courage an increased shipment, and its use there is developing. Eastern Wash ington fruits, especially winter apples, did not half meet the demand in L 893; and the market will grow to "the full capacity of our largest product of the best fruit in the world. Keep the quality, pack well, ship right and the market stays in our hands. Thousands of eastern folks will come here this spring ; hundreds of letters every day come from them to tlie Yakima valley alone inquiring about lands and business and the men will soon follow, for water must seek its level. Koom enough for the brain and brawn of our thrifty eastern brothers. * * Yakinia valley folk don't know what "hard times" mean—unles...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

Asa rule, the only native growth upon it is sage-brush aud a few hardy herbaceous plants. As those cover not a tenth part of the surface, and all are of small growth, the land is easy to clear aud smooth in readi ness for planting; the whole scarcely, if any, mure laborious or expensive than the preparation of the virgin prairie soil of the Mississippi valley. L. H. E. A BEET SUGAR MEETING. Editor The Ran-ch: I was a subscriber to the American Garden, edited by your self and associates, until November last, when it changed in management. I was very much pleased to learn you had decided to locate in North Vakima and engage in the publication of an agricultural and horti cultural paper. We need a live, practical journal devoted to farming and fruitgrow ing. To gain practical information through an agricultural paper, it should be located where it can note the conditions of climate, noil and cultivation A paper located where they are dependent upon rain is of little value in an irrigat...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

4 A HOP TALK. As a recent settler in Washington hunt ing for hop information, I called on C. M. Davis, for many years superintendent for Ezra Meeker, the well-known hop man, for a practical talk ami this is about the way it ran: I desire to plant ten acres to hops this coming spring. What is the first thing to be done ? Well, said he, if the land is ready for the plow the first thing to do as soon us spring opens ia to plow it deeply—running seven or eight inches, if the land will stand it, or which is better, in my opinion, plow five or six inches and follow with a subsoiler.loosen ing the soil several inches lower, but not throwing it to the top. The surface soil is best fitted for the crop. The plowing done, what is the next step? Simply get the soil in fine tilth and then set the poles. What would be your manner of laying off the ground and putting in the poles? Procure a flexible steel wire—say No. 12 hay wire—a* long as can be straightened readily; some say 500 feet can be use...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

WANTS Of the Pacific Northwest. A thousand farmers to grow alfalfa anil feed it on the ground to make pig pork for local consumption. The great Adams coun ty, Wash., has but 30 hogs; another county beasts but two. An acre on irrigated land will easily make 6,000 pounds of finest pork every year. A thousand farmers to grow winter ap ples. Even now not half enough nrv »io\vn for the local demand, and the market is fast developing; a demand now comes from China for them. Prices rule high. The grade of Idaho, Washington, Oregon and British Colombia fruit at the World's Fair is easy to produce. Insect pests on the ap ple are rare, and state inspection and pro tection are stringent. A thousand milk producers to build up milk dairies for cheese making in co-opera tive creameries. The few local cheese mak ers are highly successful and can not sup ply five per cent, of the demand, which will grow tor years faster than praduction. A thousand farmers to grow vegetables on irrigated lands for t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

6 MR. MILLION'S COW. Mr. Million is a real man, and he has a real cow. The two together can read a valuable lesson to Palouse, and 01/mpia Mar3h, and Skagit, and all other farmers have damaged grain they don't know what to do with. This particular cow was trying hard to manufacture hay, and other stuff usually fed tot lie family cow, into good milk for the household. Try her best, she could only turn out about a half gallon at a time. Now Mr. Million is in the nursery and seed business, along with J. G. Burrows, in Seattle, and some alleged seed oats they had bought looked so musty they declined to try to polish 'em np to sell for plauting; so Mr. Million took them home. Horses eat dry oats well enough, but respectable cows don't tpke to that sort of feed. So the oats were thoroughly steamed, and a half peck fed into the walking milk ma chine twice a day, along with a little bran. Madam Bovus took kindly to the new diet, and went to work with her mastica tor and three stomachs, her ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

liis pick of twenty heads from his high grade band at $20 each. This is, perhapa, an exceptional case, but it serves to illus trate the depressed condition of the inter est. It is a state of affairs that will im prove upon a general revival of business. But right here is the point: Intelligent, well-to-do men do not want poor horses at any price. They will pay more, pro portionately, for those well and meritor iously bred. We are confident th^jt more Tercheron or Clydesdale blood brought to bear upon the range and farm mares would result in marked benefit to the pockets of the breedes and users alike. The state fair here next fall should reveal the true status of the horse population, and may suggest useful changes in the future. A FOOLISH LOSS. The man who simpl/ feeds his store cattle in wiuter just sufficient to maintain their fall condition is a loser. That is, . the animals that come out in the spring with precisely the same weight they bore when feeding began, have consumed al...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

8 THE RANCH A Weekly Newspaper *or Everybody Whe Wants It. ritiCE—sl.oo a year, in advance. Worth—Two gold dollars. Conducted by E. H. Libby. Managing Editor, W. W. C'orbktt. EDITORIAL OFFICKB: NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON. BUSINESS OFFICKS: North Yakima, cor. Secoud and Chestnut Sts. Seattle, Room 7. Hinckley Block. Tacoma, Mil, Pacific Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. The price of The Ranch is to suit the times. We may expand in size and price Inter, but will give good value every time. A Kansas cyclone would create about aa much consternation in Washington as a Dakota blizzard would muse in the tropics. If The Ranch suits you, send us a dol lar for a year's reading of it—and as many more as you can get from your wide-awake friends. At least one enterprise will never annoy the Washington farmer: The voice of the lightning-rod peddler will not be heard in the land. As the central agricultural location, North Yakima was well chosen for the State Fair grounds. Likewise for the representative ag...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

ATTEND THE SPOKANE2CONVENTION. If you are a fruit grower or expect to be come one, be sure to make ready, and attend the fruit-growers' convention to be held at Spokane February 14. You can represent a society, or yourself if you like. We must all make a strong pull for that reduced fare, and reduced hotel rates at Spokane. We can see the persons who will market our fruits, representatives of companies hauling it, to make rates, and learn the experience of those who shipped last year. Fruit growers will come in contact with one another for general con ference and can have a talk with the nurserymen who start young trees. This convention is one of the ..*ost economical measures yet proposed to our fruit growers. THE PALOUSE LESSON, By Prof. K. W. Lake. Wheat is not always king. When na ture in her wisdom saw fit to pour forth last fall an over-abundance of western Washington "mist" our farmers began to realize that other crops than wheat muht be made to do good turn on a Palouse farm...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

IO Publisher's Desk. \Ve extend our hearty thanks to all the bright and energetic men of the Vakima region who have come forward so prompt ly in support of Ths Ramcu. If our efforts merit the appreciation accorded to the project In advance, we are sure of your continued support—and that mesins suc cess and permanence and profit to all con cerned. All that we possess of experi ence and energy and a goodly bit of property shall he devoted to its establish ment. If we fail at first to meet all of your expectations be patient and don't expect perfection at the first go-oIF. The race must be run before it can be won. <<ive us a year of trial and a cordial sup port—then issue your verdict. We are confident of the result. To sell anything: horses, breeding stork, poultry, produce, a littlf advertise ment in The Ranch will lie a s-ure helper. A half inch, four insertions, for |1, A larger space and longer time at lower rates. Want ads., Rent ads.« Uelinquishment ads., Estray a<is.,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

Money In Poultry. There is money in poultry ruising if it is conducted on a business Imsis, by doing the right thing at the right time, and not putting off until tomorrow what had better be doge today. The Pacific coast is a first rate country in which to pursue this business, as the prices are better here the year round than in most sections. Procure good stock to commence with, and such fowls as will produce the results for which you are aiming. If you want eggs, get t.Ue strain that produces the greatest number. If it is market poultry you desire, get some of the larger breeds which are noted for their early maturity. Cleanliness is one of the most essential requisites. If your houses are kept scrupulously clean and free from vermin, the fowls will be much less apt to catch diseases than if they have to live in filth. Pay close attention to every detail. Ex amine them carefully every day and as you detect the least sign of droopiness or lack of appetite in any of them, tind out t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

12 THE LOST KISS. 1 put by the half-written poem, While the pen, Idly trailed la my hand, Writes on, "Had I words to complete it, Who'd read it, or who'd understand?" But the little bare feet on the stairway, And the faint, smothered laugh in the hall, Aud the eerie-low lisp on the silence, Cry up to me over it all. So I gather it up—where was broken The tear-faded thread of my theme, Telling how, as one night I sat writing, A fairy broke in on my dream— A little inquisitive fairy— My own little girl, with the gold Of the sun in her hair, and the dewy Blue eyes of the fairies of old. •Twas the dear little girl that I scolded— "For was it a moment like this," I said, "when she knew I was busy To come romping in for a kiss?— Come rowdying up from her mother. And clamoring there at my knee For -One 'ittle kiss for my dolly, And one 'ittle uzzer for me!'." Qod pity the heart that repelled her, And the cold hand that turned her away, And take from the lips that denied her This answerless...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

Home Conveniences. By a Man Rancher. The little conveninces about the house And outbuildings make up a large propor tion of the comfort and happiness of ranch life. Not alone the things that are pur chased but tha many devices that any man possessing a modicum of mechanical skill and a few simple tools can make, at odd spells, in the busy season or during the many days »f winter when there is little to do but the chores. A step ladder; a milking stool; a saw-buck; a box for odd pieces of iron, screws, bolts, nuts and the like; a harness rack; a bracket; a shelf here and there, and a hundred and one other things that experience and observation may suggest. Let the good wife have a word as to what is needed in her department and without doubt she can aid you in sugges tions for your own peculiar Bphere of the barn, stable, orchard and field. Right here let us add, Uiost the ' 'boughteu" so-called conveniences, are no conveniences at all, but hindrances, and yet may be easily fixed so ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

'4 • WINTER GARDENS ON THE WEST COAST. The climate of the Puget Sound cities encourages winter gardening to an extent that is little appreciated by the owners of the pretty homes that might well be made tenfold more beautiful and attractive by a little attention to the planting of hardy shrubs, ornamental trees and climbing vines. Nearly all of the interesting growths of Japan would do well there. The rose-lover may take special note of the rugosa roses, of different colors as to the flowers, and of special beauty in foliage. The bright, glossy, thick and firm leaves are freer from insect and dis ease botheration than any ot the Euro pean sorts. And though I can't speak from experience, I think they would be well nigh "evergreen" in this climate. Some new rugosa hybreds have been pro duced that show exquisite variations in foliage. Most of the splendid magnolia family are presumably hardy here, and nothing else so adds dignity to a lawn. In early spring their great flowers make the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

Hasty Pudding First. For many }'ears the New England col onist dined exactly at noon, and on farms half an hour earlier. On Saturday all ate fish for dinner. Judge Sewall frequently speaks of his Saturday dinner of Hsh. Fish days had been prescribed by the King in England in order that the fisheries might not fail of support, owing to the increased consumption in meat induced by the reform ation in religion. New Englanders obeyed the mandate but ate codfish on Saturday because the Paptists ate fish on Friday. As regards the method of serving a meal in colonial tiuats, all we know is that the hasty pudding came first, for the purpose, perhaps, of breaking the force of the boys' appetites In an account of a Sunday dinner given at the house of ex-President John Adams, as late as 1817, the tirst course was a pud ding of Indian corn, with molasses and butter; the second course consisted cf veal, bacon, neck of mutton and vegetables. There is, however, some reason to believe that N"ew Eng...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 20 January 1894

16 Prosser Falls Irrigated Lands. Ist, There is, ou account or the great growth of the couutry tributary to Prosser Falls, a demand for a distributing point. It Is the outfitting point for the great Suuuyside country, that is now being irrigated by the N. P. Co., of which Paul Schulze is president. This canal is 60 miles long, of which 42 miles are now completed. This canal is 30 feet wide on the bottom and carries 653 cubic feet of water per second of time. When fully com pleted it will irrigate 70,000 acres of laud. • 2d Prosser Falls is the starting point of the great Yakima and Columbia system of canals that will irrigate 75,000 acres, throwing open to settlement a magnificent couutry. This canal is partially completed and work is being done at the present time. „,,,«„», «-i. inm A, nnilr , ii im, i « m < 3d. Proaser Falls is the outfitting point for the great Horse Heaven wheat district, comprising 400,000 acres, of which only 10,000 are now cultivated, b?rhf teProSlrTOi^tn^...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in The New West. VOL. I. NO. 4. Prospects. Too much politics in agricultural papers — not in The Ranch. Politics of all sorts and degrees have made people tired of most of the farm journals. That is the gist of one line of distinct approval of The Ranch in its separate course. We are glad to see that its absolute in dependence is agreeable to the rank and file of the people who read it. Its editors may be wrong in caring so little for pol itics and politicians, voting for honest men when up for public office, regardless of the name their party happens to wear at the time. That may be wrong. If so, then independence is wrong, and patriot ism is wrong. The Ranch as a public journal has no part in politics. It is a journal of industry and tho home. * # * Town booming will be practised until January 1,1900, the prophesied beginning of the millenial age; or at least, up to that date! Of course the Inland Empire will ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

2 insignificant culls with the good fruit; this brought the entire lot into very deserved disrepute, llon.tr Kong is a long way off, bat Calcutta in eighteen steamer (lays beyond, aud that is where a part of the Yakima product is wanted. Nothing but the soundest of. apples can stand the voyage and go ashore in presentable shape. A shame isn't it? Well, gentle men fruit growers it is just such an open ing as this for your fruit that you should b9 preparing for. What do you think about beginning next fall to pick your fine apples by hand from the trees, then sorting with the utmost care, wrapping each specimen in soft paper aud packing them with all the delicacy of touch that a poultry farmer exercises in packing his choicest eggs for long distance shipment? Will it psy, do you think? * # The board of horticulture tell me, sub rosa, that they thiuk the 1,400 samples of fruit in jars, etc., brought from the world's fair to North Yakima for the pur poses of the state fair, are not doing...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

MORE FRIENDLY GREETINGS. You are making a good paper. It will be of value to the country —Paul Schulze. A copy of your handsome new paper has just been handed me, and I write to con gratulate you on its tine appearance and prospnets. When I see the bright face of Tiik Ranch it will seem like a psrsonul greeting from you. —C. H. Howard, editor Farm, Field and Fireside, Chicago. The neatest and best farming paper ever published on the coast is The Ranch, lately started at North Yakima. It is extremely neat in appearance, well printed, and its 1(5 pagrs are full of interesting and instruct ivei information. —Walla Walla Statesman. U c Qod it well stocked, carefully operated and filled with material that must be appre ciated by the agriculturists of the northwest. The Ranch h;is a fine field and will no doubt prove a highly meritorious publication. - Seattle Trade Register. I am highly pleased with its make-up and newsy contents. Every farmer and fruit raiser in this great and crowing n...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

4 THE INTERVIEWER. Airalfa Farming—Preparation or Ground. Amount of Seed Per Acre—How and When to Irrigate—Cutting and Curing. Cost Per Ton or Alfalfa Hay— As Food lor Stock, Etc.—A Seance With Dr. Morrison. Dr. \V. F. Morrison is the owner of a fine tract of land adjoining the town of North Yakima on the south. An area of about 120 acres was seeded to alfalfa last spring, and ten acres had previously been laid down to this succulent legume. The Doctor was not born a farmer, but ho takes to alfalfa ranch* ing like a duck to water. He says farming by irrigation is tbe most fascinating business it lias been his good fortune to hit upon, and alfalfa farming is to him its most charming branch. I asked him how he prepared the ground for the crops. He answered: By thoroughly plowing in early Bpring, running the plow deeply enough to take out all the sagebrush roots. Not less than about six inches will do this. Level the ground well, thut the •litehrs may do their part perfectly. When and ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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