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Title: Cayton's Monthly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 32 items from Cayton's Monthly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

FEBRUARY 1921 CAYTON'S MONTHLY VOL. VI Editorial office at 317 Twenty Second So., in Seattle, Wa.hington PRICE $3.00 NO 1 Entered a« »econd-c!aM matter Augu.t 16, 1916, at Kent, Waih" DP P YF AP I>V'' > ington, under act of March 3, 1916. rLl\ I Lnl\ Cayton's Weekly is no more, but Cayton's Month ly is you before! Its full of things, that read quite well, but up to you the truth to tell, whether Cayton's Monthly fills the place, where Cayton's Weekly lead the race. It may be better or be worse, but it takos less money from my purse; and that was why the chango was made, while traveling up this heavy grade. And then again I've always longed, for some thing that, to me belonged, which would produce my daily bread, without me working off my head. The shadows of my final night are slowly gathering 'bout my sight, and if I'm forced to toil all day, without a minute to rest my clay, it won't be long till I'm gone, across the creok, to the great beyond, and so the balance of my time,...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

2 Uncle Sam's Voting Strength In view of the fact that Congress is now wrestling with the question of re-apportioning the representatives to the House of Representatives of Congress it may be of interest to the roaders hereof to know how many votes were cast in the late presidential election and how thos; votes were distributed among the various Etates. It is within the power of Congress to base Rep. D m. Soc. Proh F. L. H. Repr. ALABAMA 74,690 163,254 2,:5(i& 757 10 ARIZONA 37,016 29,546 125 — 2 ARKANSAS 69,874 105,618 - 7 CALIFORNIA 624,922 229,191 64,076 25 085 11 COLORADO 173,248 104,936 8 046 2,807 3,016 4 CONNECTICUT 229,238 120 721 10 350 1,771 1,947 5 DELAWARE 52,858 39,911 988 956 ■ 1 FLORIDA t... 44,353 90,515 5.189 4 286 4 GEORGIA 41,081 107,162 465 S 12 IDAHO 88 321 46,576 1 ILLINOIS 1,420,480 534,395 74,747 11,216 49 630 27 INDIANA 696,370 511,364 24 703 13,462 16 499 13 IOWA 634,074 227,921 16,981 10,321 11 KANSAS 369 195 185,447 15 510 8 KENTUCKY 452,480 456,437 6...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

It will be observed by studying the above tabulated election returns, that the eleven states, all of the South, which registered Democratic majorities, cast 2,986,088 votes for all candidates, just 132,971 votes more than were cast for all presidential candidates in the state of New York. The eleven Democratic states, Alabama, 10; Arkansas, 8; Florida, 4; Georgia, 12; Ken tucky, 11; Louisana, 8; Mississippi. 8; North Carolina, 10; South Carolina, 7; Texas, 18; Virginia, 10, have a total representation in tho House of Representatives of Congress amounting to 106 members; while the statD of New York, casting, in round numbers, but 100.000 less votes than the eleven Democratic states, has but forty three members in the House of Representatives, which gives to th > aforesaid Democraiic states almost two and one-half times greater voting strength in Congress than the state of New York, which is neither just nor fair. In this country all men may be born equal as runs the preamble of th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

4 Editorial :: View :: Point Unless the signs of the times greatly deceive the student of passing events, especially in this country, the aftermath of the late world war will develop the question of: Is the United States of North America fully capable of self government? In the North the capitalist and the mechanic are in a rule or ruin fight for supremacy and in the South the whites and the blacks are all but ready to fly into a fight to a finish. If therefore, all of the above elements become active in trying' to enforcs their respective forms of govern ment, it will then be quite apparent that none of them can prevail and governmental chaos is bound to fol low fast and furious, which would mean the gradual falling to pieces of this once magnificient govern ment and perhaps the same become a vassal or tribu tary to Japan and Mexico. President Elect Harding is now in the throes of making up his official family for the ensuing four years .which very thing has caused all presidents e...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

Since the mind of man runneth not to the con trary, hjstory has repeatedly reputed itself in the coming of a like event to one which transpired some period or time in the past. Mora than forty years ago W. O. Bush, a man of white and colored blood, using the racial designations of this country, was elected a member of the legislature of the state of Washington and the Bush election to the first legislative finds a counter-part in the election of John H. Ryan, of like class identity, to the seventeeth session of the same legislature. It thus follows as does night day, what man has done man will do. Mr. Bush won fame in this state forty odd years ago in raising the world's finest wheat, and Mr. Ryan has won fame throughout th> northwest as a publisher. After all man is but a constant going and coming of the same thing. Three members of the city council of Seattle are to be elected in February and the vital question among the voters thereof is, shall the three retiring members succe...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

6 ANOTHER SOUL GONE WRONG (BY HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON) House Bill No. 36 of the legislature of th e sta'e of Washington, has for its object the prevention of, using the vulgar vernacular of th 5 streets, "white folks from marrying niggers and chinks," the same having been proposed by one Robert A. Tripple, who hails from the forty seventh legislative district, where a heavy per c ntage of (he electors are colored citizens, and who voted for him in the general election not knowing he eland stinely entertained such radical and revolution ary ideas. Since the minds of the living citizens of the Puget Sound coun ry runn th not to the contrary, this self same Tripple has been importuning his fellow citizens to, "give me an oflis," bu' they seamed to have realized that there was no m thod in his madness, hence his ravings were given (little, if any, consideration.. However the freaks of the direct primary law are various and varied, as was seen in Tripple being nom inated as a running mate o...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

Know Your Own State la an annual publication recently issued a com munication appeared therein from Clark V. Savidge, s'.ate land commissioner of the stato of Washington, depicting the po3sibilities of small farming in West ern Washington, and though the editor of this pub lication has lived in this section of the stati for the past thirty years, yet much it contained was so un known to him that it is absolutely news. In our opinion hundreds of the readers of this monthly will be glad of an opportunity to road the communication, hence it is horewith reproduced: CLARK V. SAVIDGE The state of Washington is coming to be recog nized as a mecca for tho small tract rancher or farm er. No longer does the non-city producer believe that he must till hundreds of acres in order to make a decent living. There are great farms in this state but they are not necessary for a living of quality. The small tract, set out in fruit, berries or even vegetables is recognized now as the best method of gain...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

s land as will b3 offered. These circulars show each tract of lanrt that has been applied for and will be mailed to any inquirer upon request. These descrip tions not only show the geographic location of tho land applied for, its location relative to county, sec tion, township and range, but also show the land's character, whether or not it is susceptible to irriga- Whither Are We Drifting ? In its issue of December 23rd 1920 the Advertiser Journal of Kent, Washington ran the following story, which is herewith reproduced as a matter of historic information first for the readers hereof and secondly for editorial comment. Tho article is well written and from the average Colored man's view point is unusually fair. Here is the story: "The best and largest yield of wheat ever exhibited, grown in western Washington. It sounds like a real estate folder. And yet at the World's Centennial Ex position held in Philadelphia in 1876, W. O. Bush, son of George Bush, one of the first sutlers on Pu...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

greater voting public wanted, and the story of his mulatto origin made no more impression upon the public mind than does water upon a duck's back, he, even break ing the record and earring tw southern states and getting a larger vote in the South than any Republican candi date for a quarter of a century. We repeat, is this the solution of Uncle Sams race problem? Is the colored man to be slowly but surely absorbed by the white man? Is this great human melting pot to consume alike the Red, the Yellow, the Brown and the Black man and emerge therefrom a mongrel race with the presence of all manner of man? From the Noi'thwest, once on a time went to the United State's senate, a man va. whose vains, Madam Rumor whispered about, flowed Negro blood, however that senator ranked just as high as any of the other senators and that to despite the fact, the story followed him to the National Capital. The War and Its Aftermath Crime waves have followed all wars and especially those with which the...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

10 The Origin of Jazz (BY MADGE R. CAYTON) Just what is jazz? One has a vague idea of a dis orderly number of sounds played entirely for dancing. But jazz has a far deep.r significance. It is an attempt to reproduce the marvelous syncopation of the African Jungle. It is the result of the savage musican's won derful gift of progressive retarding and acceleration which is guided by his sense of ewing. He who would play ja^z nnut have rhythmic aggressiveness. As one iran put it, ja: z music is the rtelirum tr mens of suyco pL.i'on. It n strict rhythm without melody. The words ja;, jazz, jazz, J&3Z, and jascz are of Afrcan origin but come direct form the Creole patois and idiom meaning "speed things up." For in th> old plantation days when the slaves were having one of their rare holidays an fun would languish, some West Coast African would say, "jazz hdT up," and then things would go fast and furious. Today "jazz her up," is still a slang expression with the same meaning. There ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

Seattle Colored Citizenery According to a report made by the Rev. D. A. Graham of Seattle, Commissioner of Survey of the Puget Sound Conference of the A. M. E. Church, who has but recently completed the survey of the color ed population of Saattle, the colored citizens of Se attle own taxable property valued at $1,500,000 and church property valued at $70000. There are still other parcels of rjal estate owned by non-resident colored citizens that would easily swell this amount to two millions dollars. The colored citizens of the city conduct business ent rprises as follows: Three grocery stores, one haberdashery, one second hand furniture store, three real estate offic ;s, one cabaret, seven barber shops, one factory, seven restaurants, six jbeautjy parlors, ten rooming houses, four fuel dealers, four physicians, two dentists, one undertaker, three chiropodists, seven U. S. mail carriers, nine U. S. mail clerks, nine transfer men, two hair manufacturers, four carpenters, five cement...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

v> A Coming Woman Few if any young women of Miss Lodie Maurine Biggs class have reached the degree of success in th i Latt.le of life as has she. It is too often the case with young woman circumstanced as is Miss Biggs that they early d spair of attaining the gc. al of their ambition because they early discover that the road they are com relied to travel in order to so do is a far more difficult one than the road he young woman of the dominant eliir. 5 of the citizenry of this country elects to travel to reach the same goal, yea not only do they dispair, but actually lose their ambition to rise and shins, h nee what might have developed into more or less useful life drops into a state of inertia, perhaps indolenc), and further still frequently stubborness. Miss Biggs first saw the light of day In Little Rock, Arkansas, but with her parents early moved (o Seattlj where she successfully passed through the grammar and high school grades and then the university of Washington, taking ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

( ) AY rr C) N\S MO N TIIL V BUSHELL "Here is a man" that the voters of, Seattle would do them selves proud to nominate and elect to the city council at the com ing municipal election because he is always on the square and on the level. Th 3 editor of this publication has known John Bushell in a business way for upwards of thirty years and has always found him in his associations with his fellow citizens frank and fair, and as we speak of him so, in our opinion, will the multiplied thousands of others, who have done business with him the thirty-one years of his business career in Seattle. John Bushell always spoke truth fully and dealers have purchased thousands of dollars worth of goods because he put his O. K. on them and none of them were neither de ceived or disappointed. Already indications point to him being one of the six nominees for the councilmanic election and if nominated his multiplied thousands of voting fri mis in Sea'tie feel absolute ly certain of his overwhelming e...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

14 Election By Terror In Florida From The New Republic "I want to register." "All right, Jim, you can, but I want to tell you some thing. Some God damn black...is going to get killed yet about this voting business." The questioner is a colored man in Orange county, Florida. The answer is from a registrar, white, of course. Tin Negro, cognizant of the sinister truthful ness of the reply he had received, would probably decide (hat it was not particularly healthy for him to press his request. Thus, and in many other ways equally as flagrant, did tho election of 1920 proceed in Florida and other southern states. The Ku Klux Klan, of infamous post-Civil War memory, has been actively revived in the South. Its avowed purpose is to "keep the nigger in his place," and to mantain, at all costs, "white supremacy." In spite of vigorous denials on the part of its leaders, the branches of this organization have entored upon a campaign of terror that can mean nothing but serious clashes involving ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

women were not allowed to vote though they had fully qualified in every way. It is these whose affidavits are being secured. More serious and more distressing, however, was the situation found in Orange County where the election clash at Oco:e occurred. News despatches of Novem ber 4th told of the killing of six colored men, one by lynching, and of two white men, when Mose Norman, a colored man attempted to vote although he had not registered nor paid his poll tax. The facts, secured on the spot, reveal an entirely different story. Throe weeks prior to election the local Ku Klux Klan sent word to the colored people of Orange County, that no Negroes would be allowed to vote and that if any Negro tried to do so, trouble could be expected. Norman refused to be intimidated. The registration books at Orlando show that he had qualified and registered. He was unpopular with the whites because he was too prosperous he owned an orange grove for which he had refused offers of $10,000 several ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 February 1921

.16 CAYTON'S MONTHLY The Laurel Apartment Steam Heated—Well Furnished A Comfortable Home for You Convenient to the Rail Road Depots and the Thing For Trainmen The Apartments Are Ready Take No. 9 or 11 or Yesler Way Off at Twenty-Second So. The Laurel Apartments 303 Twenty-Second So. Beacon 1910.

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 March 1921

MARCH • V- -—-19^—- C A V T O N'S MONTHLY HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. Editor and Publisher. VOL. VI Editorial office at 317 Twenty Second So., in Seattle, Washington PRICE- 53 00 NO ? Entered as second-class matter August 16,1916, at Kent, Wash- DC P YPAP I>V^* ngton, underact of March 3, 1916. rLK ILAK Page White River Development 2 A Relic of Barbarism 3 Editorial View Point 4-5 More Truth Than Poetry 6 Negro Denounces Crapshooting 7 Mt. Zion Baptist Church 8 Building Committed 9 About Mt. Zion Baptist Church 10-11 Uncle Sam's Japanese Colony 12 The City Election of Seattle \ 13 Better Late Than Never jg Table of Contents

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 March 1921

2 White River Development Traveling from Seattle to Tacoma over the Pacific highway but partially discloses the agricultural and In dustrial possibilities of the White River valley. Those fertile and alluvial acres practically extend from the gates of Seattle to the Pierce county line and though the most of them have been in the possession of indi vidual owners for the past seventy years, yet the entire valley is still in but a semi-developed state. As you sweep along the highway you get the impression that that valley is the cornucopia from a fruit and vegetable stand point (and it ought to be) for mighty Seattle and her surroundings, but it is safe to say, that it does not furnish her a hundredth part of the fruit and vegetables she consumes from day to day. Just why the white man, with all his pent up energy and persistency, should fall asleep at the switch and permit those vast and fertile acres to go undeveloped for all these years and still making little or no effort to put th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 March 1921

A Relic of Barbarism "Death on the gallows is your lot, and may the Lord have mercy on your soul" were the fatal as well as the final words of the trial judge of the superior' court of King County of the state of Washington, in the closing chapter of the criminal career of "John Smith," who recently ran amuck in Seattle, murdering throe policemen and seriously wounding an innocent bystander, but the words of the majesty of the law was almost jokingly received by the doomed man and he marched off to his death chamber apparently without either regret or remorse, even intimating, the sooner the better. But after all "John Smith" is no less a human being than the judge on the bench, and aftor thinking it over and realizing that soon his soul would stand before the God, who gave it, and be judged for its deeds in ilfe, he saw the ertor of his ways and being but human, ere he took his flight to the bar of Soul Justice he became anxious to make amends for his criminal acts. The sight of de...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's monthly. — 1 March 1921

4 Editorial :: View :: Point PRESIDENTIAL CHANGES As Cay ton's Monthly goes to press today, March 4th, 1921, all America is undergoing a radical political change due to the passing of Woodrow Wilsonism and the advent of Republicanism with W. G. Harding as standard bearer. This prince of the vox populi, W. G. Harding, is being inaugurated at high noon today, March 4th, and from the Maine to Mexico and from the Atlantic to the Pacific the world and his family are all smiles, first because the country is to officially lose Woodrow Wilson who, on being inaugurated pres ident of the United States, not only became chief exe cutive, but likewise became the judiciary as well as legislative functions of the government; great rejoic ing, it is repeated, bursts forth from the bosom of every tr"ue American at the thought of losing such a political autocrat. The belief that President Harding is the exact counterpart of Mr. WSlson and the rejoicing over the coining of Harding is one of the world ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Monthly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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