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Elephind.com contains 12,746 items from Commoner, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 23 January 1901

co Lh- 00 zf J, . - faPi. C-- Jo !4 vT VOL. I. NO. 1. LINCOLN, NEBRASKA, JANUARY 23, 1901. $1.00 a. Year. resist, The 'Bl Hk Commoner. - ! ll - I Wi. ...mII...IIM .iiiinliMa , , MMMMMMIM.MM...IMM...WaMMlMMMl.MI,.MMW.M ( Vyilli&rri 4. Breugu, Editor and Proprietor. -.A The Commoner. "Webster defines a commoner as "one of the common people. " The name has heen selected for this paper because The Commoner will endeavor to aid the common people in tho protection of their rights, the advancement of their interests and the realization of their aspirations. It is riot necessary to apologize for the use of a term which distinguishes the great body of the population from the comparatively few, who, for one reason or another, withdraw themselves from sympathetic connection with their fellows. Among the Greeks "BLoi polloi" was used to describe tho many, while among the Romans the word "plebs" was employed for the same purpose. These appellations, like "the common people," have been assume...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 23 January 1901

. , ,.,-..,., , .i,....L.;.Ti3fS P??ff?55S?!-irrt,f'j?'"' ,' nw " t J " I .iaiiWMiWijiiniuuiiWin'iyn'Wi'winiiiu'-ni ' 2' a member of the Presidenta cabinet; he ought to wit next to the prcsHidunt in the council chamber. Receiving 1i5h nomination from a national conven tion and h'lH commission from the people, lie is able to furnish the highest possible proof that he enjoys public respect and confidence, and the President should avail himself of the wisdom and discretion of such an ml visor. While the respon sibility for action rests upon the occupant of the White HouHO he is entitled to, and of course de sires, all the light possible before deciding on any question. Congress can by law impose upon the Vice President the'duty of giving such assistance to his chief, or the President can of his own volition establish the precedent and it would in all proba bility be obsorved'by his successors. Many public men have avoided the second place on the ticket for fear it would relegate them t...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 23 January 1901

WlWlWmNNIWf "H-v wwtf w- The Commoner. T 1 JJ i 'Another Endless Chain. Secretary Gage recently appeared before a House committee and urged the enactment of a lav specifically requiring silver dollars to be redeemed in gold on demand, lie argued that, as the legal tender law makes silver the equivalent of gold, the' government might as well offer to furnish gold in exchange for silver as to allow silver to be presented in payment of revenues. To use his own expression: The government might just as well face the situation and meet this silver with its right hand at the front door as to take it with the left hand at the back door. And this is the reasoning of a financier! lie sees no difference between a credit money and a standard money; he thinks it a matter of no moment that his plan reduces the quantity of basic money and increases the quantity of redeem able money or, in other words, contracts the foundation and expands the super-structure. But of this later. It is worth while to...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 23 January 1901

ypi yw" - twbt- wp-w'""ir""V fra '"VltUT WWS rl If ?l The Commoner. a; . w - fTI .... T)...-Ttln A lstA " :r lormB ruvuuio m .nuvuuwi OnoYear r9l.0O Biz Months 60 Throo Months ; 35 Singlo Oopy W) No Traveling CauvaHHers Arc Employed. Subscriptions can be sent direct to The Commoner. They can also be sent through newspapers which have auverusea a ciuddmk rate, orinrougnprecinciaKcm;swiici . such agents have been appointed. All remittances should ' be sent by postofllce order, express order or by bank . draft on New York or Chicago. Do not send individual checks, stamps, or money. Advertising rates furnished upon application. Address M l t-.ll - 1 i' an commiinic:mmis i(i THE COMMONER, Lincoln, Nebraska. ' Application made for entry at the postofllce at Lincoln, Nebraska, as second class matter. So many have expressed a desire to have their subscription "begin with the, first number of The V . r if.-i. ,.,,, ,. pore February Sixth, this date of the third W TBUin,' WITT TIM wriMMMM' au...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 23 January 1901

5S5'1lifl,,ll' "JFlP?WFy '"xt"-.- The Commoner. Looks Like Aristocracy. the couiltry into one great concern. Of all the trustSjf that would he the most disastrous to busi ness interests, and of all the burdens imposed by the .trusts, that burden would be the, largest. It may be that there are many people in this country who, like the Missourian, must be shown. It is not difficult to see that there are many railroad magnates who are willing to show them. American American farm machinery is Goods shipped by water 8,000 miles Abroad. and by rail from 500 to 1,000 miles and sold to English and Scotch farmers for less than the American con sumer 'nust pay. Ocean and railroad charges must be .added to the article sold the Englishman and the Scotchman and the 'machinery sold in competition with English machinery. If Ameri can implement men can pay all these freight bills and compete on the foreigner's soil, why should American consumers be deceived by their plea . for protection against fo...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 23 January 1901

r-l,'1TB1(OTJff8!SML'lV " JMffafi Wff!WHM"ir'yt' ! ' -vrM.WWip! WWt-PiiPtiWilifjlj PS m' fa. The Organization. After tho defeat of 1800 tho gold democrats mct and congratulated themselves upon their part iii' the republican victory and demanded a re organization of the party. A second defeat has brought forth another chorus of criticism and a demand that the party management be turned "over to those who for the past four years have ". tfhcld themselves aloof from the organization and .spent their time in condemnation of the policies endorsed in the party platform. Men who have repudiated the party creed and the party candidates, and yet pride themselves upon their superior democracy, urge a return to what they call the iirst principles of democracy. Pressed for some definite statement of their views they either evade the question or resort to lan- guago too ponderous for the understanding. Whatever diiferences of opinion may exist con cerning the various planks of the Kansas City pl...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 23 January 1901

4 w HHH- H"feM-f ! 'i 1 1 1 i' H-H H llilllti IH- Whether Common or Not UH-t'H 1 8 I 1 I -H-M l-l M- H 1 I H-M"t"HH"t"fr nan, Poor Alan. Trusts in crudlcs and bottles und milk, Trusts in wool and in cotton; Trusts in needles and pins and threads- Cursed by trusts when begotten. Trusts in headgear und clothing and shoes, ' '"' ' Trusts in physio and lighting; Trusts in everything he must eat . ' Life is a strenuous fighting. .' 9, 'Taxed by the trusts while a babe In arms, "' Taxed late, early and of ten i Taxed on the comforts of youth and ugev , . , Taxed lit last in his coflln. Taxed on tho marble that marks his rest And tells the world "Hie Jacet;" This will explain why a man don't nceuV , A shroud that has a pocket. esaann Modern Definitions. Syndicate 8 und H 2 0. Trust Legalized grand larceny. Subsidy Fruition and suckcrdom. Constitution A manuscript collander. Flag Corollary of commercial asset. Patriot The man with the concession. Assimilation Synonym of grab; a mask. Duty P...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 23 January 1901

y, 'mr v '"rw"i",ww4jwrjwps E,- b : L 8 The Evils of Ship Subsidies. TJio Journal of Political Economy contains a very interesting article relative to' ship subsidies iii Europe. This article is from the pon of Prof. Frank L. McVoy, of the University of Minne sota. Mr. McVoy says that the experiences of England, .Germany and France do not give encouragement to the advocates of the ship sub sidy in America. Following arc extracts from Mr. McVoy' s interesting article: England stands forth pre-eminently as a ship building" and ship-operating nation. Ilcr experience lias been repeatedly referred to us an argument in favor of the bill before Congress. .Inst how far has the English government encouraged her merchant murine? In 1808 there were 10,400,043 net tons of shipping flying the English Hug. During tlio sumo year Eng lish imports and exports amounted to 8:1,715,047,89.'!. Of this tremendous amount two-thirds were curried in English bottoms. What, .then, is the secret of the English...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 30 January 1901

3,f-r "?Wt . The Commoner. . . v VOL. I. NO. 2 LINCOLN, NEBRASKA, JANUARY 30, 1901, $1.00 a Yeair Williaum J. Bryan, Editor and Proprietor. Queen Victoria. England's queen has closed her long and event ful career and her death has brought sincere sorrow to her subjects. Her administration was popular because her personal virtues were worthy of admiration, and for the further reason that she allowed her people (those who have parliaments), to have their own way in matters of legislation. Her birth, her education, her environment and her own interests all led her to support the monarchical principle of government, but, measured by any rule that can be applied to a throne, her reign will compare favorably with any previous reign in English history or with the reign of any contemporaneous sovereign. Her influence tended toward peace, and there is every reason to believe that war was al ways a source of real regret to her. Her age, her high character and her womanli ness combined to make...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 30 January 1901

-wnrrwM W l"l'llliWqPHWB'W ft K ' I 2 . war with Mexico limn rlMioiruiB Clorwin, and cvon Abraham Lincoln repeatedly .added his protest against that war, and yet the names of Corwin and Lincoln are among the illustrious of America's dead. TJio dillorenco between a monarchy and a re public is that in a monarchy the people must aoquicso in the monarch's will, but in a republic the public ollicers are supposed to acquieso in the people's will. "The king can do no wrong" so long as he does exactly as he pleases. The pub lic oflicer in a republic can do no wrong so long as he adheres to the Constitution and the law. When he violates that Constitution and when ho trangresses that law, he is in error, and it is just as much the people's duty to criticize him then as it is their duty to commend him when he sustains the Constitution and upholds the law. Men who insist that this nation, in its deal ings with its new dependencies, shall be governed .by the same principle which the founders of ...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 30 January 1901

u The Commoner. . the people from their public servants but also to moderate disappointment and discontent. The sooner the people can hope for remedy the more patiently do they Biilmiit to that which they con sider error or injustice. A four years term is long enough for a good president and too long for a bad one. The Wages of Sin. prejudiced him in Mrs. Stanford's eyes, he was a favorite not only with the president of the uni versity, but with all with whom he came in con tact. But as soon as the report of his anti-Japanese speech reached Mrs. Stanford she insisted upon his resignation and the resignation was .forth- . ( coming. Subsequently, Professor George E. Howard, of the same university took occasion to r criticise the policy of interfering with the liberty of sueech in univcrsitv discussion. Professor Press dispatches announce that Xcely, the Howard bokUy deolared that ProrC8801. jlo8H ,ijH. ibezKlor of Cuban postal funds, who, by the mis8al WM a blow aimc(1 dire(jU ftt .lc...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 30 January 1901

.l J I l-r v 4 i a The Commoner. Issued Weekly. Torms Payablo in Advance Ono Yoar. Six Months Throo Months. Singlo Copy.' ....$i.oo . . .60 lOO 05 No Traveling Ouiiviihhqi'H Arc Employed. Subscriptions can be sent direct to Tim Commoner. They can also be sent through newspapers which have advertised a clubbing rate, or through precinct agents where such agents have been appointed. All remittances should be sent by postollice order, express order or by bank draft on New York or Chicago. Do not send individual checks, stamps, or money. Advertising rates furnished upon application. Address All communications to THE COMMONER, Lincoln, Nebraska. Application made for entry at the postofllce at Lincoln, Nebraska, as second class matter. I Bo iiimiy have expressed a desire to huve their subscription begin with the first number of The 'OOMMONISK thllt ALL SUIISOIUPTIOXS DECEIVED HK FOKK Fl'MUtUAllY SlXTII, THE DATE OF THE TlIlltD ISSUE, "WILL II K J2NTEUEI) AS OK JANUARY TWENTY- ii? f Ni'ttf...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 30 January 1901

-fliwywirinnjir-" jj The Commoner. s"fst w T!"w ." A Cure For Vanity. quotations. Goods of Amorican manufacture can "be found all over tho world. They come into competition with the labor of all other countries, and yet, under tho protonse that our industries are infants and need government aid, a pationt and long suffering people tolerate a high tariff whilo great monopolies hide behind the wall and are less kind to American citizens than to those who reside in foreign lands. . Buying The fact that so many heiresses Titles. ftre infatuated with titled for eigners and marry them to secure social distinction abroad suggests a new use that could be made of colonies. According to our Constitution titles of nobil ity arc not to be tolerated in this country and the possessors of titles must renounce them upon becoming Americau citizens. If, in the pending cases, the court holds that the Constitution does not extend to Porto Rico and tho Philippines, the President might justify the creati...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 30 January 1901

55ww'5Fp'J!lw i"jw"f V fe. hi I !fc. &i !.. r r.t is '. .owners it appears further that less than' a. dozen ship-owners and only, four shipbuilders would foe beneficiaries. "This then is what the ship subsidy bill would do, summed in a sentence: It would take from the pockets of 70,000,000 people $0,000,000 a year to put it into the pockets of less than two J(.on private business concerns all told." Broken Pledges. The Peoria Herald-T r a n s c r i p t says: "Whenever protective du ties have been imposed, increased or retained in revisions of our tariff their principal justification and, indeed, their avowed purpose hae always boon to create or stimulate competition in this country. Nothing is clearer than that every protected interest which has entered into ono of combinations called 'trusts' has broken the promise under which it obtained its tariff pro tection and should be Bummarily deprived of it." Nothing is clearer than that the Peoria Herald Transcript has in simple langu...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 30 January 1901

TTJT"TI .' - ;ur '. U 0 'f 444444-l4ril,N4- H44"l4HhHHHhlH 11 4-4 ! Whether Common or Mot ...H-iHHhf"M4HHtiH''E"HI I 1 lill H-H-H b Duty and Destiny. When a people luntf for rcedom, Grab fcheir lands "because wo need 'em;" Hold 'em up and deltly bleed 'cm . k That's the now, the modern way. Shoot 'em lull of moral suasion; t Prato of lovo when you've occasion; Start out right on each Invasion But be sure you make It pay. Shoulder arms and. be preparing" t For big slices when they're sharing Lands of those who have the during ' To ask freedom this lato day, Seize a pleco and call it duty (Duty Is one name for booty) ', If a victim speaks of loot, ho Should be told " 'TJs destiny," ., Show the world you lovo your neighbor; Talc and keep fruits of his labor; If ho kloks, get gun and sabro And convince him though you slay. But be kind while you are looting; Be benevolent while shooting, While at lovo of freedom hooting And be sure you make It pay. ,- - v. .- S' -4 . 'f -. Thwarted Ambit...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 30 January 1901

" "wwwyTJ7',!'p J T ' 6 In the Palace of the King. TJndor the hcadlino " Things a King Cannot Do" tlio Chicago Tribune prints an interesting reference to the powers and privileges of mon archs, as follows: The rulers of the peoples of the earth, of whom there arc now seventy-six of recognized importance, have on the average much Iobs power than is usually imagined. The new King of Eng King and land, for instance, will find when ho Subject. ascends the throne in many ways ho is not as free as his subjects. An ordinary Englishman may travel where ho pleases and may select his own traveling companions. Tho King of England may not leave the coniines of the empire without being accompanied by a Minister of state. The British constitution provides that the' King shall hold himself at all times in readiness to sign acts of Parliament af tor they have passed both Houses of the national Legislature. Until they have been so signed they do not become law. It might liappon that in somo crisis t...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 6 February 1901

iWEWIi ' ' The Commoner. VOL. I. NO. 3. LINCOLN, NEBRASKA, FEBRUARY 6, 1901. $1.00 a Year. ffmmmmm VUillleLm J. Bryan. IBcIItor Arid Proprietor. The Cuban Constitution. The Cuban constitution, as it has been drafted and will probably be adopted, is, in many respects, similar to that of the United States. Cuba is de clared to be "a sovereign and independent state under a republican form of government." The provision for citizenship is a? liberal as ours. The guarantees of personal liberty, religious freedom, freedom of speech and of the press, are similar to those in our Constitution. The president is to be elected by a direct popular vote, "an absolute majority thereof cast on one single day" being essential to election. The term of office is for a period of four years. The president may be re elected, but is ineligible for a third consecutive term. The vice-president has powers and author ity similar to ours. The congress is to be com posed of a senate and house of representatives....

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 6 February 1901

't ) lativc body which otight to stand above suspicion. Third. Senatorial elections, as conducted at present, intorfero with the legitimate work of state legislatures. Whatever causes may have led to the adoption of the existing method of electing senators, experi ence has not only shown that the people can be itrusted with the direct choice of their public Bervaiits, but it has also demonstrated that the nearer the Government is brought to the voters th'o bettor it is for both the Government and the people. Thore is more virtue in the masses than ever finds expression through their representatives, 'because representatives are influenced, to a greater or less extent, by their personal interests. It is true that even with popular elections the nominations would be made by conventions, but !the fact that the voters would afterwards sit in judgment upon the work of the delegates would bo a constant restraint. The last few years have furnished so many in- f-stances of corporate influen...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 6 February 1901

r He probably remembered that a general of -the United States army had signed an agreement wherein it was stipulated that in certain territory, where United States sovereignty had been de clared and over hich the United States flag waved, any slave might have the privilege of obtaining his freedom by paying to the master "the usual market price." In that particular case the "usual market price" is said to be about $20. In San Francisco it would seem that the usual market price ranges from $1,700 to $2,500. The difference, however, is purely one of dollars and cents. And if $20 could be designated as the barrier to human freedom in the Sulus, the "heathen Chinee," perhaps, felt justified in rais ing the barrier in California to the extent of a few hundred dollars. Navigation Laws. " An Old. Merchant," writing to a New Tork paper, says: Why ignore the true reason why American mer chant shipping does not grow as fast as Germany's? Mr. Depowjbold the Senate it was because Germany paid b...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The commoner. — 6 February 1901

SmS???5MwiBw5wfT wnmpp 95 - r- ? 1 ii The Commoner. Issued Woofcly Terms Payable in Advance, .One Tear Six Months-.. iThrco Months ? Single Oopy. .$1,00 .60 .35 .05 No Traveling Canvassers Are Employed. CiihcfSUrtMe f-tn Vi cnf Hit-urf r TlIP COMMONER. They can also be sent through newspapers which have Hvr)tcnH o xliiMiiniy mfa f f lirnnrrh nrirnr aifftlltS where such agents have been appointed. All remittances should be sent by postoflice order, express order or by bank ' draft on New York or Chicniro. Do not send individual rchecks, stamps, or money. ff Advertising rates furnished upon application. Address fill communications to THE COMMONER, Lincoln, Nebraska, Amplication mnd for entrv at the nostoffice at Lincoln, Nebraska, as second class matter. So many havo expressed a desire to have their ubscription begin with the first number of The Commoner that all subscriptions received be fore February 13th, the date op the fourth "issue, will be entered as of January Twenty third AND...

Publication Title: Commoner, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Nebraska, United States
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