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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 July 1917

CAYTON'S WEEKLY PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Facifio Blk. Telephone Main 84. IT'S HIS PRIVILEDGE If he is a citizen in the freest and full est sense of the word, then why has not the black man of this country the same right to migrate to the different sections or even to another country that the white man has, and that too, even if he goes in large neumbers, as he is now doing 1 from the South f Who has t...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 July 1917

a state of unrest and unless some steps be taken before the present administration draws its last breath we will be fighting ourselves instead of a foreign foe. The president, to all appearances, has turned the management of the government over to the Southern Democrats and they are directing it along selfish lines instead of patriotic ones. This is supposedly a free country, but with the laws the Southern Democrats are putting on the statute books, from time to time, it is rapidly losing its freedom. Ex tortion in this country is now like unto a hydra headed dragon that sweeps up the hills and down the valleys, seeking 1 whom it may devour. In our patriotic zeal we are overlooking our country's needs. HIRED PRESS FIGHTING ROOSEVELT The anti-Roosevelt daily press of this country is very much exercised over the probability of the French people dubbing our soldiers Teddys and to avert the catas trophe Sammys have been suggested in lieu 1 hereof. We really believe Sammys would be more ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 July 1917

OUR GRADUATES (The Crisis) During the current year there have been graduated from the great universities nine teen colored Bachelors of Arts, and five Masters of Arts. From the state universi ties, which rang for the most part equally as high, there have come thirty-seven Bachelors of Arts, one Master and one Doc tor of Philosophy. Other Northern institu tions have sent out twenty-one Bachelors of Arts, making seventy-seven Bachelors in all from Northern institutions. There have come from leading colored colleges two hun dred twenty-two Bachelors and from other colored coleges one hundred fifty-six, or three hundred seventy-eight in all. This makes a grand total, of four hundred fifty five Bachelors of Arts, as compared with 338 in 1916, 281 in 1915 and 250 in 1914. Omissions would probably bring the actual number of graduates up to at least 475. The record in detail is as follows: The Great Universities Harvard sends forth ten colored Bache lors of Arts: E. L. C. Davidson, U. W. Ho...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 July 1917

Burton, University of Pennsylvania; Frank P. Rayford, University of Michigan; B. L. Duke. State University of Iowa; in dentis try: P. W. Sawyer, Creighton; C. E. Cheeks, Western Reserve; J. X. Burwell, University of Pittsburgh; E. M. Gould, Tufts; E. J. Cobb and W. 11. Beshears, State University of lowa : C. L. Evans, W. M. Howard and B. C. Styles, University of Michigan; in pharmacy: J. F. Berry, Purdue; A. J. Pope, University of Michigan; Miss A. P. Bell, University of Kansas; G. D, Strawn, State University of Iowa; L. Williams and C. Strowiherd, University of Pittsburgh in veterinary medicine: B. L. Colbert and J. 11. Stephens, Ohio State; in law: Henry A. Rucker, Jr.. Northwestern; I. F. Bradley, University of Kansas, and Xorris, Yale; in the ministry: A. T. Peters, Yale. From Boston University, medicine, 1; Creighton, dentistry, 1; University of Pitts burg, dentistry, 1; pharmacy, 2; Western Reserve, dentistry, 1; Temple, medicine, 3; dentistry, 1; pharmacy, 3; teachers' colleg...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 July 1917

CAYTON'S WEEKLY PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 613 Pacific Blk. Telephone Main 24. SEATTLE'S STREET CAR STRIKE Not for more money nor for shorter hours, but for the official recognition of the union did the sixteen hundred Seattle street car men strike and thereby demoral ize the traffic and traveling conditions of the entire city. The public should con sider well this situation before giving the strik...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 July 1917

••ind operate the same. Since the appear ance of the jitney in Seattle the street car company claims that it has lost heavily on its investment and public sentiment being favorable to the jitney it apparently being impossible to drive it out, though it has been badly hampered. The stock holders, it is ar gued, see even worse conditions for them in the future than in the immediate past and to dispose of the entile street ear system and lighting plant to the city, would mean no further loss of money on their part. The move on the part of the city authorities to throw the company in the hands of a re ceiver has not been discouraged by the lo cal authorities of the company and this has given color to the allegation. If there be anything in this and if it should happen to come about then Seattle would be in municipal ownership up to its head and if there be any merit in the theory, it would have to be brought out or the city would herself soon be in bankruptcy. With the city operating th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 July 1917

WOULD DEPORT THE NEGRO Ilwaco, Wash., July 6.—To the Editor of the Telegram:—Your editorial of Thursday, "East St. Louis Shame" is lacking in that it does not take recognition of the funda mental fact that this nation cannot endure half white and half black. Grant foresaw this great truth and advocated the purchase of Cuba and the deporting of all Negroes. The honest but mistaken people who established equality in law of people who are not by race on an equality are responsible for such outrages as the East St. Louis shame, which is but the beginning of the great strife. This is a country of the white race and whenever and wherever the black race mul tiplies and comes in conflict with the white race just such scenes as the East St. Louis shame may be expected. It is easy to as sume a virtue when we are not in direct touch with an evil. We of the white race who are not being crowded by the black race wrap our virtuous robes about us and cry "shame." And it is a shame, but we are resp...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 July 1917

IN THE PUBLIC EYE Mrs. Thomas R. Wilson leaves within a few days for a visit with her parents and friends in Denver, Colorado, and will be absent a month or more. Oscar Collins has just completed one of the most up-to-date garages in the rear of his home to be found in the city, which but adds to the splendor of his already mag nificent home. The Negro Business Men's League of Se attle met last Sunday afternoon and en joyed a splendid meeting. Sufficient money was raised to mail out the most of the 2500 copies of the booklet recently issued by the League. Thomas Jefferson of Everett, who was re elected grand secretary, is one of the best informed men on Masonry in the state and his public addresses in the past have dem onstrated that beyond a question of doubt. He left for his home Sunday evening. Major R. R. Wright, who is on the Pa cific Coast attending the National Educa tional Association, which was held in Port land a few days ago, will occupy the pulpit of the First A. M. E. c...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 July 1917

CAYTON'S WEEKLY PRICE FIVE CENTS OAYTON'B WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle. Washington, U. 8. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Cltisens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year In advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CATTON.. Editor and Publisher pffioe, 613 Pacific Blk. Telephone Xaia 94. WHITHER ARE WE DRIFTING? To watch the seething, struggling masses and the heartless classes prepare for a war of extermination, and that certainly will be the result unless oil be poured on the troubled waters, well may we ask, whither are we drifting? That this civilization, of which we boast, is but savagery veneered, ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 July 1917

Slates and through him, the people of our common country, to put an immediate end to these murders and bring the murderers to speedy punishment, thereby helping to 'make the world safe for democracy' by making democracy safe for the world and ~for mankind, without exception. "He it further resolved, That we call upon New York's representatives in the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States to do all in their power to bring the murderers of these innocent American citizens to the bar of justice." Following is the resolution adopted praising Col. Roosevelt for his fearless stand for fair play and democracy: "Resolved, That we tender to Colonel Theodore Roosevelt the assurance of our continued admiration and a full and unre served expression of our deep and lasting gratitude for the stinging rebuke adminis tered by him to the apologist of the East St. Louis murderers. We regard it is a high privilege to be able to point to him as not only the world's greatest living st...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 July 1917

President Leonard of the Traction Com pany may be having his own way so far as the company's end of the strike goes, but there is no denying that, he has~things to think about these hot days. As the summer grows hotter, "What to wear and how to wear it,'-' does not greatly disturb the "summer girl" because she wears so little that it gives her little or no •concern as to how and where she wears it. , 'It is estimated that the products of the .extra gardens in this country will amount to $3,500,000. Now if the trusts will just not make us pay for having raised this amount of stuff, the poor people will be greatly benefitted. The listed properties of the Labor Tem ple and its allied companies would, in our opinion, be darn "poor security to back a jitney service, which might at any time be sued for twice the amount the Labor Tem ple offers for a general security. It's simply silly. Seattle has been at the mercy of the law yers of the states of Washington, Oregon and British Columbia f...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 July 1917

open the doors of opportunity to its higher representatives we find the country largely concerned in forwarding an effort to make migration from the South difficult, if not impossible, and industrial welcome in the North unlikely. The Negroes are invited to remain in a land which annually lynches from fifty to one hundred accused colored men without giving them even a semblance of a trial and which allows practically no colored man to have a voice in hi* own gov ernment. Moreover, when the Negro, breaking away from tradition, advice, and pressure, comes to the North, how is he welcomed! Instead of always finding work under mod' em conditions the conditions are too often lowered to "fit* him. Thus we come back to our first proposi tion. The Negro problem consists of the refusal of America to learn or admit that the same laws of social development hold in the case of black as of white workers, and this is all the more astonishing since hundreds of thousands of these workers whom we ca...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 August 1917

CAYTON'S WEEKLY PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOB CATTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Pacific Blk. Telephone Mala 84. LISTER IS RESPONSIBLE In the last legislature of Washington a bill was introduced by the Hon. R. A. Hut chinson, which passed both branches there of, and had it not been vetoed by Governor Lister it would now be possible for the authorities to strike at the tap root of I. W. Wism now spreading so rapidly in the industria...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 August 1917

President Wilson has ordered the examin ers to not enlist in the U. S. military serv ice. No, the $8 per day soldier would need no pension and shouldn't get any, but sickly sentiment would give it to him just the same. An ex-Union soldier once drew an enormous pension for total mental and phy sical disability and was subsequently elected to Congress on the Democratic ticket. Of course the Negro student officers at Fort Dcs Moines, lowa are "making good." If these 1200 young colored men do not make good it will be the first instance where they were put to a test that they did not make good. But all of this is not convincing to a Democratic administration —it is simply made up of damphools. Whenever there is a clash between black and white folks the Associate Press always gives the readers thereof to understand that the blacks got all the worst of the clash and that may be a fact, but the same As sociae Press also tells how from 100 to 10,000 whites quickly come together to dis pose o...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 August 1917

LOCAL OBSERVATIONS After an absence of three months in her former home town, Spokane, Mrs. John Byron Parker is again in Seattle at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Andrew R. Black. While away she was attending a sick son, Harry. She is the mother of three sons, and all of them are shining lights in their respective fields of labor. Harry has at tained much local fame in Spokane as an electrician; Byron ranks high in the U. S. naval service and Charles S. is now train ing at Dcs Moines, lowa for a U. S. army officer. Mrs. Parker is rightfully proud of her four children. Four hundred colored persons in Seattle subscribe and pay for Cayton's Weekly, and, of course, four times that many more read it. This is rather remarkable for one year's existence and we feel like patting ourselves on the back. This however, does not give us the idea that "we occupy an exclusive field," but we have an idea that in two years more, if we continue to grow as we have, every colored family in and abou...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 August 1917

(lay call op the bank for an extension of time and bo more is heard of the loyal Negroes till another loan is needed, or an extension required and then there is another "Be it Resolved, That we reaffirm our loy alty to our country." The truly loyal Negroes of this country are not assembling in mass meetings, and passing high Bounding resolutions, and re affirming their loyalty to the country for that loyalty has never been qupestioned, but they are studying plans, and devising means, just like the other citizens of this country, to do whatever is best to bring this great Avar to a triumphant close, and in such a way that he, the Negro might get some of the glory and honor thereof. The Negro is clamoring to get in the navy, the marines, on the torpedo boats, the destroy ers, the submarines, in the artillery, and in every other branch of the service where duty may be performed. If the Negro were given the chance for which he has been begging, and which will be given him before this wa...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 August 1917

CAYTON'S WEEKLY PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year In advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Pacific Bile Telephone Main 24. THAT SILENT PROTEST (The Freeman) It's not every person that knows that 10,000 Negro men, women and children pa raded the streets of New York last Satur day afternoon by way of showing their dis pleasure at the race riots in that city, in East St. Louis and in other parts of the country. The demonstration is spoken of as...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 August 1917

DISCUSSES THE NEGRO To the Editor:— There appeared in a recent issue of your paper an article from the pen of one Wal ter Seaberg ; a reply to an editorial appear ing in the Portland Telegram. In his art icle he attempts, though very feebly, to show cause why the "Negroes should be deported." lie further says, "This nation cannot endure half white and half black." If one based their conclusions on the color of the skin there might be grounds for this claim, but when one with firmness of mind and broadness of vision bases his deduc tions on the finer, nobler qualities of man hood and womanhood, this nation can en dure, not as half white and half black, but a strong and powerful nation of loyal, lib erty loving, united people. And again he further says, "The honest but mistaken people who established equal ity in the law of a people who are not in race on an equality are responsible for such outrages, as the East St. Louis shame, which is but the beginning of a great strife." Such sta...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 August 1917

JUST LISTEN TO THIS The visitor was much interested in his host's garden, and noticing a very fine gooseberry bush, the berries of which were covered with abnormally long hair or bristles, he asked the owner the cause of it. John, who prided himself upon his gar dening knowledge, and who was known to be always ready with an answer, replied after a moment's thought: "Well, you see, sir, it wasn't always that way. Them ber ries used to be quite smooth, but we had one of them long-haired Persian cats, and it died. So I buried it under the tree; and ever since them berries has always had long hair on them like that." And We Call Them "Dumb" Animals A number of New Yorkers were present ed to several distinguished foreigners, among them the Chinese minister, and one of them told an incident that illustrated the remarkable intelligence of a dog of his. The minister said, with a smile: "I am reminded, sir, of a Chinese story. "There was a Chinaman who had three dogs. When he came home one e...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 August 1917

LOCAL HAPEIfINOS The picnic of the Household of Ruth will be held at Wildwood Park. The Colored Citizens Brass Band Com pany held a successful picnic and outing last Monday. Mr. and Mrs. George W. Thompson, formerly of this city, but now of Belling hiim. air doing well in their new location. Mrs. V. Laning, who has been visiting with her daughter in North Yakima for nearly two months, is expected home in a few days. Mis. Mattie Hicks and daughter, who have been visiting friends on Puget Sound for the past two weeks, left for Spokane last Thursday. The musical given at the Mt. Zion Baptist church last Monday evening by the Jubi lee Singers, was well attended. The ren ditions were the best that have been heard in the city for many months. Since taking employment at the Puget Sound Navy Yard as carpenter, Robert Harvey has been repeatedly promoted until he is now engaged in finishing work. After deciding to learn the trade he was not long in developing into a skilled mechanic. Mrs. Dan...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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