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Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 399 items from Austin's Hawaiian Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

Il'l w I; ) b-- f "ho- 2--KViifcl23 0 , 'N -rvFCa-scsC' "HWfc ; - MW Devoted to the Progress of the Pacific Vol. I. HONOLULU, JUNE 17, 1899. No. 1. In Progress of the Pacific. President JlcKinley's Philippine Policy. trmrz ESSffiBR President McKinley and his administration are being severely criticised by many of the most in fluential journals and periodicals of the Unit ed States. Anti-expansionist journals are loud in their denunciation of the war now being waged against Aguinaldo, while expansionist papers are very satirical concern ing the "benevolent inten tions" of the United States, stoutly claimed by the ad ministration, yet so loudly proclaimed to the Filipinos only at the mouth of can non. It seems to be the con census of opinion, however, that the majority of the American people are in favor of the policy of ex pansion and would not consent to relinquishing any of the territory won by their victorious army or the purchased sovereignty over the Philippines. If such be the ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. prominent general, with the American forces in the Philippines, is quoted as saying that it would take 100,000 men to whip Aguinaldo if he could command perfect harmony in his army. There can be no doubt of this but the successive victories of the Americans is having the effect of disintegrating Aguinaldo's forces. But the Filipinos nave gained tlieir point. President Mc Kinley is now willing to treat with them and is busying himself with a plan of liberal govern ment lor the Philippines and there can be no doubt that these plans will be tar more liberal to the Filipinos tlian they would have been it Aguinaldo had not fought to obtain justice and right. President lucKinley was disposed to throw the whole Philippine question upon Congress and that body having adjourned witnout denuue ac tion he would doubtless have waited until the meeting ot next Congress beiore acting, had it not been tor the Pmlippine war. it is noc ai ail unlikely that betore tins issue ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. ment among the powers, which will for a time neutralize the jealousy between them that might lead to war. The only interest we have in the matter is what influence, if any, the conference may have upon the future relations of the great powers to the Orient and future activities in the Pacific Ocean. 1 Ml Next to the Philippine question, probably nothing has recently commercial supremacy, would it not be a matter of right as well as of good policy to permit Ger many to annex the islands after the other two powers had selected suitable sites for naval and coaling stations? The Samoan Muddle the Samoan Muddle. been the subject of more comment by con contemporary journals on the mainland than It is a subject that must naturally be of great interest to home readers. It is, therefore, discussed at greater length else where in these columns. Is it possible that ecclesiastical jealousies, at this the very dawn of the twentieth century, can still wield an influence ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

jny rtpyfmJN - COL. STORKE'S STOOL PIGEON. A BOOM STORY. By Franklin Austin. "There was one man who went through the Los Angeles boom and did not know it was on," said Joe Thompson as we sat sipping our wine after dinner. "Impossible," I exclaimed in surprise. "It's a fact 1 assure you. The strange part 01 it is the boom made him rich and he doesn t know to this day how it happened. His name is Chris topher Sykes, the most absent-minded man I ever knew always wool-gathering. Id e is a philos opher in his way and a mighty good writer. His pen was always in demand. "Mrs. Sykes is a bright nervous little woman and intensely practical in her ways. Her hus band's absent-mindedness and deliberation is a constant source of exasperation to her. She is always scolding him but without effect in curing his excentricities ; yet it was easily apparent that she sincerely and devotedly loved her 'old fool' as she good naturedly called him." "It was commonly known that Christopher Sykes had hell on...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

- n.-n "'rrVpT) "TIFl "KT' xitlr. AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. Therefore, I have found it practical not to ques tion my wife concerning minor matters such as the application of words, etc. " '1 have put you down for a few lots in the Wolfskill subdivision which is on sale to-morrow," said the Colonel very much relieved. " 'I am truly grateful to you, sir. Bless me if there is anything I can do I will read you " 'Come to think of it,' Storkc hastened to in terrupt him, 'there is something very practical you can do for me. I have here a bottle of water from Eureka springs (producing it from his inside pocket) which I should like to have analyzed with a short report signed by yourself.' " 'I shall be only too glad!' exclaimed Sykes delightedly, pocketing the phial as they rose from the table. " 'That is the beginning of the end,' murmured Col. Storke to himself as they parted. 'It is risky. Very risky. Ah, if he ever finds out and turns that caustic pen of his against us we are gone gone ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. Growth of Honolulu. THE JUDICIARY BUILDING. SCENES AT WAIKIKI. Honolulu's beautiful suburb bv the sea. James Creehuan, the world-renowned war correspondent, while standing on Punchbowl heights a few months ago said: "I have visited nearly every tropical city in the world but this is the most romantic and beautiful of them all. Furthermore, it is the only one I have seen that is clean even approaching cleanliness. If the United States continues to annex such pos sessions as this every American ought to have a 'swelled head.' " Mr. Creelman's compliment is deserved and highly appreciated. Honolulu has passed through many stages of development. The first commercial activity in Hawaii was the sandal-wood period and trade with China. After the sandal-wood trees die 1 out the whaling period made business lively un til the whaling fleet was destroyed during the civil war. In the early sixties the manufacture of sugar, even in its crude state became a factor in the...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

"'''qfqgsiijjjipyewwi! AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. pelled the attention of the local legislature and capitalists and was enabled to accomplish the re sults referred to. Since then he has been at the head of nearly all the important enterprises floated in the Hawaiian market. Marking as he does the fourth industrial period in Hawaii he may be said to be the principal factor in the extraordinary increase of wealth in recent years that has made these islands so famous. In architectural beauty Honolulu is fast be coming equal to that of the most modern cities. In fact, it may be considered so now. No more beautiful edifice of worship can be found any where than Central Union Church. It is built of blue lava rock which has the appearance of granite and is just as durable. The majority of the recent government buildings and business blocks are also built of this material. The execu tive and judicial buildings are most imposing structures built of concrete blocks and are de signed to last fo...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. fllscellaneous. Tlie biographies of Mrs. Lynn Linton and Mrs. Oliphant are awaited with interest. St n SS Only 1300 pictures have been accepted for this year's Paris salon, against 2000 in years past. SS St St ew play by Basil Hood called "lb and Lit tle Constantine," founded on one of Hans An dersen's tales. f$ $6 f& Negotiations are on foot to produce in London this season M. M. Audran and Ordonneau's comic opera, "Ces Soeurs Gaudichards," now running at the Gaite, Paris. SM St St Mr. J. C. Dibdin, a descendant of the famous song-wViter, and himself an author has purchased Lytton, grandson of Bulwer and the son of Owen Meredith. St St St Fifteen thousand people heard Aeschylus' chorus of the Danaids sung recently in the Greek theatre at Syracuse, in presence of the author. The occasion was the visit of the international press association to the city. St St St The London correspondent of the New York Times says of the Royal Academy exhibit: "It lias no...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY Devoted to the Progrcn of the 1'actftc, it Commerce, Political Significance and the Aetlville of the Twentieth Ctntury. FUANKMN AUSTIN, Editor ami Proprietor Subscription, 10 cents n copy .$4 00 per year Hustiiest Office, 314 Fort street Hip-xtulrs) HONOLULU, JUNE 17, logg OUR REASONS FOR EXISTENCE. 1 know it is without precedent to address a saluditory to the public in the first person, excepting, perhaps, the case of Frank Munsey when he launched his great magazine. This has encouraged me to break away from the conventional newspaper discipline that has been drummed into me for the last ten years in the United States. The fact is, could not address the Hawaiian public, so many of whom are my personal friends, in any other way than in the first person, in launching Aus tin's Hawaiian Weekly. Any thing short of this would have seemed cold. I want to get close to the hearts of the people. Austin's Hawaiian Weekly is launched lecause ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

10 AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. Philippine Government. The President evidently believes that Aguinaldo means to surrender and caused the Secretary of State to telegraph President Schurman of the Philippines Commission the nature of the proposed govern ment. It is to be more civil than mili tary, and somewhat similar, al though a little more liberal, even, than that now in operation in Porto Rico. The head of the government will be a Governor, whose func tions will be civil, although he may be a military man. There will be an advisory coun cil composed of natives of the Philippines, whose business it will be to confer with the Governor on official matters and suggest changes in the manner of exercis ing authority. The local govern ments will be entirely in the hands of natives, subject to certain super vision by American authorities. The plan proposed amounts practi cally to an autonomous system, and it is believed here that it will be acceptable to the natives. It will continue only un...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. ii ! I Wit and Humor. Correspondent sends another curious epitaph to be found in Illinois: "Thou'rt gone, my husband, to the better land. Vainly I look for another in thy place to stand." AAA Up to date: "We are going to have the most realistic missionary sermon at our church next Sunday." "Indeed." "Yes, in deed ; the church is to be decorated with rifles and Gatlings." Indian apolis Journal. AAA Curiosity: "What's your pur pose here?" asked the savage. "We're going to civilize you," answered the white man who had just landed. "Ah I What method do you use Springfield, Lee-Met-ford, or Krag-Jorgensen ?" Washington Star. AAA "Why does he make all those motions with his arm before he pitches the ball?" "Those are sig nals to the catcher. The two men always work in concert." "Dear me! Is that the 'concert pitch' I've heard about so often?" Chicago Tribune. AAA "Did the investigation annoy you?" "Not much," answered the practical politician, who had just been o...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

12 AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. Echoes of Religious Thought. BY W. K. Azbill. God sons our fellowmen Save them from every sin - Make them thine own; From heaven, thy dwelling place Look on our helpless race, Save them through Jesus' grace. Thou Holy Une. Teach us to know thy word, O, thou our only Lord Thy will be done Bid all our strifes to cease, Let ChrUtain love Increase, Give us thine own sweet peace, Oh, Make us One. "Whatsoever you would not that men should do to you, do you not to them." Confucius. "Whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, do ye even so to them." Jesus. When the priest and the Levite, on the way to Jericho, passed by their unfortunate countryman with out showing any indignity or ad ding any thing to his discomfort as they would not have liked an other to do to them they were within the requirement of the gold en rule of Confucius ; but when the Good Samaritan took him up and carried him on his own beast to an inn, and provided for the suffer er's cure, ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

T'fmurrp ripv-vx"TWP-Tjif!imrw'Yr' AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. 3 Prohibition and Temperance. By Anne M. Prescott. I "So the Lord awaked. as one out of sleep ; and like a giant refreshed with wine, He smote his enemies in the hinder parts ; and put them to a perpetual shame." The Psalms, Day 15, Common Prayer. "Because right is right, to fol low right, were wisdom in the .scorn of consequence." It does not enter into the "eternal fitness of things," this hateful term "Prohibition," in any civilized and highly enlightened country on this planet no. And we know whereof we speak. It is not worshipped nor even tolerated indeed, it is now often consid ered an effete and threadbare sub ject for debate by scientific logi cians and statesmen. It is simply an irritant, an urper of the very evil it sometimes honestly, doubt less, seeks to allay. But as it is proved sophistry the whole argu ment, consequently falls to the ground. We do propose to give up our freedom, nor toss it over, one inch of...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

H AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. Crisis in American Education. In a recent article Mr. E. A. Wintlship very pertinently puts the difficulties encountered in popular education in America where the educational system must depend upon the whims of the common peo ple for support. He says : Whatever form the educational crisis may take, the issue will be whether all children shall get the most out of the public schools, or whether interested parties will get something at the expense of the children. This will determine whether there are to be scientific education al experts in leadership or bosses, political or otherwise. An educa tional boss is but one removed from his political stepfather. A scientific educational expert is a long way from the "fool reform er," the crank theorist. Such an expert thinks the schools are for the greatest good to the greatest number of children, and not an ex periment station for the glory of the self-styled expert. No legislation will accomplish the enthroneme...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. 15 Are Hawaiiansfrom Aryan Stock The Rev. Herbert H. Gowen, F. R. G. S., rector of Trinity church, Seattle, Wash., was at one time attached to Honolulu cathe dral. He read recently a paper on the "Hawaiian Language and Indo-European Affinities" before the Washington State Philological Association, which is now reprinted in The American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal. Mr. Gowen argues that the service rendered to comparative philology by the dis covery that the European lan guages were descendants of a common ancestor, makes it easy to conceive that "if the borders of the accepted doctrine can be so en laiged as to take in, with Hindu, Greek and Teuton, the scattered tribes of Polynesia if it can be proven that one branch of the great Aryan family journeyed ever eastward to meet at last the relics of another branch which voy aged southward and eastward, it will be easier to-day to welcome as fellow-citizens the dusky children of Hawaii recognized at last, ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 17 June 1899

16 dNlPii esg AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. pacific Iftail Steamebip Co. ccioental & dental Steamship Co. anb XToo IRieen IRateba. ,TJrjt - -v j-jf-J Steamers of the above Companies will call at Honolulu and leave this port" on or about the dates below-mentioned : FOR JAPAN AND CHINA: CHINA JUNE 10 DORIC JUNE 24 NIPPON MARU JULY 4 RIO DE JANEIRO JULY 13 COPTIC JULY 21 AMERICA MARU JULY 29 CITY OP PEKING AUG. 8 GAELIC AUG. 16 CHINA SEPT. 1 DORIC SEPT. 9 FOR SAN FRANCISCO: NIPPON MARU JUNE 10 RIO DE JANEIRO JUNE 17 COPTIC JUNE 27 AMERICA MARU JULY 4 CITY OF PEKING JULY 14 GAELIC JULY 27 CHINA AUG. 8 DORIC AUG. 15 NIPPON MARU AUG. 25 RIO DE JANEIRO SEPT. 2 For General Information apply to H. HACKFELD & CO., LTD., Agents. I1

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 24 June 1899

Devoted to the Progress of the Pacific Vol. I. HONOLULU, JUNE 24, 1899. No. 2. Progress of the Pacific. , China-United States vs. Russian Aggression Wu Ting Fang, Chinese Minister at Washing ton, in an address re cently made at Philadel phia, pointed out very clearly the dangers to be feared from Russian aggression. His views arc valuable as they un doubtedly reflect the complexion of Chinese thought concerning Russia's encroachments in the Orient. Mr. Ting Fang, likened Russia to "the leviathan," which, having no vitals, cannot be mortally wounded, however severe the blow may be. In the opinion of the Chinese Minister, Russia, with limitless num bers entrenched in her re in o t c and unassaible strongholds can neither be ousted from her position nor prevented from ad vancing. "It is madness," Mr. Ting Fang further says, "to abate one particle of the issue and declare that something ought to be conceded for the cause of peace, to pretend, as do some Englishmen already weary of the s...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 24 June 1899

"Vr7nwfiF; "TTinttry 1 7riTli.ytFttrY$Y?f-i '' "T"n pFJTrr AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. Missionary Work In China In a recent number of the North American Re view the influence of missionary work o n China is discussed as follows : One additional source of evidence of China's awakening is found in the spread and success of missionary work. This is a liberalizing influence of incessant and unmeasur ed activity ; it is exerted on large numbers, main ly, the youth, in all grades of society, from the lowest upward, and over a great extent of coun try. It is a training in knowledge and virtue, ac cording to the world's highest ideals, under con ditions favorable for deep and lasting results. It is a leaven cast into the bosom of society, not for a day or a year, but for generation after gene ration, slowly but surely leavening the whole mass. It reaches further and penetrates deeper, and abides more permanently than any merely ex ternal influence. By its very nature, the Christ ian society t...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 24 June 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. Count Cavotir, who once more created a united Italy, the misgovernment of that country has passed into proverbs. There is no kindlcr or more humane man in Europe than the present' King of Italy, and the misgovernment of his coun try lies with the Parliament and not with the King. In an evil hour that Parliament was smit ten with the rage for expansion, and Italian armies were sent to the shores of the Red Sea, where they miserably perished. Italy presents to the world the strange spectacle of tens of thou sands of her people fleeing from their own coun try to every part of the civilized world in search of food and raiment. '" " v If now we turn to our own country, we have much room for contemplation. Aside from men under the absolute dominion of optimism and the lust of conquest or plunder, the great body of in- ual expansion of mankind, of the developements of invention and machinery, and of the amazing progress of (art and science. No period of civiliza t...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 24 June 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. b&' V THE RATTLESNAKE RANCH. HOW SEALY GOT EVEN. By Franklin Austin. Written by the author for a paper he published in Southern California iu 1893, unsigned and copied by many of the Metro politan Journals of the United States. HeUscd ami rewritten for Austin's Hawaiian Wkkkly. Joe Sealy was quite a character in his way. He had been a frontiersman, man and boy, for fifty years. He had moved on as "westward the star of Empire takes its way" until he had at last settled in Inyo County, California. He was one of the pioneers when the great Serreia gardo mine was struck that yielded sixteen million ounces of silver before the vein gave out. Sealy had undeveloped mines galore. He might almost be said to be mine poor. When Serreiagorda was at its height, Lone Pine, was a mighty lively place, I can tell you. The games were going all night and at least one man was buried in his boots, every day The highest record being nine corpses in twenty four hours. But the...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
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