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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

Ranche and Range. VOL. I, NO. I. FIRST PRIZE PEN BUFF LEGHORNS, OWNED BY CHAS. D. PIERCE, OAKLAND, CAL. The above illustration represents one of the most famous prize-winning pens the Pacific Coast has overseen. They are the property of Chas. I). Pierce, ex-mayor of Oakland, Cal., whose birds carried away from four leading California shows, 1896-97, every first prize and a total of 14 out of iS possible regular prizes. At the California State Poultry Association show, Jan. 1897, he captured the American Buff Leghorn cup for best display. At the Oakland show in January his ten best specimens scored a total of 940 points, average 94 points each; twenty best specimens, total score 1865, average 93^4 points; the best cock and four of his pullets, total of 559 points, averaged 93 8-10 points. They won two silver cups, two gold medals, one silver medal, and every special. . Mr. I. K.- Felch, the well-known judge, pronounces Mr. Pierces fowls the best collection in the world, and his opini...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

2 Hfiriculfcurs. TREATING ALKALI LAND. A Kansas Man Gives Several Very Good Pointers. The query is frequently made by Northwestern farmers as to how to neu tralize tho alkali in low Ifcnd. 11. Mob ler, <>l Kansas, in a recent number of tlie Breeder's Qaxelte, presents tho following: Your correspondents from Montaon, MoNiveu Bros., seem to be At a loss to kuow how to treat a small patch of strong aikali land lyiog io the center of • twenty-acre field. We Infer thai this ground (threettcrei) is situated lower than the adjacent, because seepige they say from balance of field when irrigated made the alkali patch so wet that it was impossible to cut the grain which grew on it with a binder. The fact that this is low land is largely the reason tlio patch is so strongly alkaline. Alkali fronr. adjoining lands has been washing into it for years. Now these parties say they intend to eeed the 20 acres to alfalfa next. May, as it is first class alfalfa land with the exception of the thre...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

Poultry Yar<d. THE THOROUGHBRED. The larmeis of the New Northwest ure bagtaning to see the real merit of the thoroughbred fowl. This development of interest in the poultry business is very gratifying. The man who avers now adays that "the chicken isn't worth botherinsr with" is becoming scarcer all the time. Then the fellow who says that the standnnl-bred fowl is "all a fake,'1 is also rapidly disappearing— probably drowned in the depths of his own ignorance. For it is getting into deep water when the declaration is made thai there is no utility in the feathered thoroughbred. It in a fact that any barn yard dung-hill can produce an egg that will hatjh. She can become broody and set on that egg and in the course of time bring forth a measly chick. She can rear that chick to maturity, to fatten and to be used as food. We must ad mit that in the mere point of "doinjj1' the mongrel and the thoroughbred are equal; but there is a difference in the quantity and the quality of their doin...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

4 Horticulture. THE PROFITABLE ORCHARD. Suggestions by One who has been Nearly a Halt Century a Hortlcuurlst. BY J. M. HIXSON. As a grower of fruits and baudler of same for a period of forty years, I will try to briefly give my ideas as to the dif ferent varieties of fruits I think most profitable in this state. Owing to differences in location, soil, sunshine and fog, the exposure or slope of land, it is a very difficult matter lo ad vise intelligently without full particu lars, and in places I have seen orchards where none but aNorih Uaro inian would plant black-eyed peas. Then the question it. as to whether the grower desires to cater to a local, an eastern or a foreign market for Ins pro ducts. Alaska, Cliina, Japan, Hawaii, Cen tral and South America, as well as east ern markets are points we must look to, nnd plant with a view to supplying, for, by the time the orchards now being planted are in bearing, these countries will all be drawing more or le.» from us. I am an earnest ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

inea number of good features, and we are informed that it has proven a great success, the fruit having kept in splendid condition and commuuding this spring as high as $1.3) per box. The dimen sions are 12x40 feet, and height of six feet in the clear. It is sunk about four feet below surface level, and banked up over roof with a foot of earth in the U9ual manner. Tbe interior is divided in the center with a passageway, mailing full length of cellar, and on each side are the apple bins, about 5x3 feet. Each bin is divided by three shelves 18 inches above each other which hold the fruit. Ordi narily H is the practice to pile the apples in the bins severat feet deep crushes and ruins those at the bottom, The shelving prevents this and gives a free circulation of air. Good ventilatiou is necessary and has been provided for by a window at either end, which may be closed in cold weather. The shelves are inclined tow ard the front on a slope of 3 inches, so that when boxing the fruit rolls...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

r, Wl\& Dairy, THE JERSEY COW. A Splendid Treatise on this Great Dairy Breed. BY D. M. SHANKS. For profit on the farm and in the dairy ■be stands to-day without a peer, it is needles* in this connection to cite the man}' lists, both public and private, in which she lias demonstrated her super iority. It would bike ninny pages—in fact, many whole issues of this paper to record them ; but it is the purpose of this article to call your attention to facts with in the observation of every intelligent dairyman. If you wish to sell milk or cream to the oily resident, what is it that always finds ready customers at an advanced price? Why. Jersey milk and Jersey cream. The demand is always greater than the supply. If yon wish to make butter that will sell for a price that will bring you a profit, that in »rain, lla vor and color is near perfection, you must have Jersey cream to rnnke it of. If you are a patron of a creamery, you will receive Irom 25 to 88 1 8 percent, more for Jersey mil...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

WANT A CREAMERY. Farmers of Sunn/side Invite Proposals From Creamery Men. Editor Ranch ia and Ranuk. : At a very enthusiastic meeting of the farmers of Sunnyside recently it ' whs unanimously vosed to invite proposals from creni men for the erection of a creamery plant here. It, was also voted to offer a bonus of one dollar -per cow for all cows fur nishing cream the first year, also a free Bite of one acre of ground. A cred itable number of cows were pledged for a starter with tfood . prospects of the number beib^ doubled or trebled before the year was out. An executive com mittee was appointed of which .las. Henderson was chosen secretary. This section oilers a line opening to Home practical creamery man who will put in a permanent plant. . , U. I). Yoi;n<;. SI'NNYSIDK, Wash. Ranohß'ANU Ranuk can but give a hearty second ! to tbo Rod JO of Sunny side's people. The establishment of a creamery in that valley will result profit ably not only to the founder, but to the community it...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

8 Ranche and Range. ISSVEIS E^VEOR-S" THVHSDAT. In the. Interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists ltd stockmen of Washington. Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah and Hritish Columbia. Subscription (in advance) ... $1.00 Per Year. HILLER FREEHAN, - - - Editor. Address alll communications to RA.NCHK AND It A NOB, Box (MS, North Taktma, Washington. The object of RANCHE AND RANGE is to foster and en courage the development of the farming and stock interests of the Northwest. It will be absolutely non-partisan. We hope to make • Journal that will b; "velcomcd in every rural home in the land- « « « EDITORIAL NOTES. We grow bigger as we become stronger. For one dollar a year we send Ranchk and Range to any address in the United States, Can ada or Mexico. To lose a ten dollar hint in order to accom plish ten cents worth of extra labor, is about what the fanner does who has no time to read his farm paper. Help us to grow by doing a little missionary work for RANCHE and RANGE among your neighbors. S...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

NOTES BY THE WAY. Not infrequently we hear much dissatisfaction expressed regarding existing conditions in Cen tral Washington. If the grumblers would only widen their sphere of observation, and as care fully note existing conditions elsewhere, they would be far better satisfied with their present locations. Compare the climates, soils, roads, va riety of crops and yields per acre, qualities of fruits, vegetables, forage plants, etc., and even our markets. Instead of grumbling we should all be optimists regarding our county and our future. Do our farmers see a steady depreciation in the values of their lauds, while the exhausted soil re quires expensive phosphates as in New York and Pennsylvania? Do we lie awake nights fearing the effects of drouths, floods and tornados, as in Ohio, Illinois and Kansas? Do we have to shel ter and feed our stock six mouths in the year as in the Dakotas and Wisconsin? While we have been having delightful weather for a month past, and our farmers have ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

IO 3win@ Department. STILL WE IMPORT. Pork Products Come Into the Northwost by the Trainload. S. L. Moore, general freight agent of the Northern Pacific lias recently been talking iv print on his favorite topic ami showing that daring 18.)(>, in addition to an immense quantity of butter and eggs shipped into Nortlnvest .states, there were imported from the east 14,<K)J.000 pounds of hog products to Montana, Washington and Oregon. Mr. Moore does a good deal of thiuk ing on this subject, and when lie talks it is always to the point. It may be for the immediate pecuniary interest of the railroad he represents to haul all this? freight westward, but broad-minded railroad men recognize that what adds most to the iuconce of their roads is the general prosperity of the communities to which they furnish transportation. When the Northwest supplies .its own needs in the way of food products to a greater extent than they do now, its people will have more money to spend on dry goods and o...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

Fjri@Fly SaiJ. Every fanner should devote the profits of an acre of ground to securing good farm and news papers.—Prof. Baliner. Dehorning, is both, profitable and liu inauc. Range entile do better and the dairy herd is more docile.—Jus. Gleed, Natcheez. The dairyman must give np the idea of general purpose cows and use those Hint have beon specialized for him by 1 >ny: years of training and careful selec tion.—Miss Minnie Eshelman, Selma. The Pierce county fair association lias elected new director*, with Dr. C \V. Chamberlain president of the board. If the association will confine its scope to exhibits of* products rural and manufac tured, and hold the fair in smii'1 rail of Taeonirt near the business center, it can be made a success both financially and us ;i repreaentation of what an agricultural fair should be. — C A Tonneson. There is money in rai^in^ potatoes in tha YaKima valley at $(» per ton—Goo. Taylor, .Selah. Head the youu^ trees low. Allow no crotches to form and ma...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

12 Vfi© Rloaks. FEEDING SHEEP. Results of Two Years Close Observation in the Yakima Valley, IIV Xl), WKIXKW. When sheep are to lie fed for winter mutlOll good resul's will be obtained in the following manner: If sheep are near the feeding grounds early in the fall allow them to graze on an alfalfa field (or other good pasture) from about tin; lOtli 10 the last of October. Experiments have proven Hint wlieie the alfalfa has grown ' to ' the height of fro ten to fourteen inches results ate much better i>nd le ss danir< rous limn where it is smaller. If pastured ril al falfa, the first fi-w days the sheep should not be allowed to' maze more than one hour at a time, or loss will result from bloating; and it should he remembered that the younger and smaller the alfi.lfa the more dangerous. This fact seems not to be well understood by most sheep men, though experiments have proven it. to be true. The last few days that sheep are allowed to graze in the fall they B'iould be fed es eh...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

*Fhs Horse. A CONSISTENT BREEDER. One of the few men who have consist ently stayed in the horse business (luring the long period of its depression, is George Hull, of the Selah valley. He has gone on breeding just the same as though they were worth $100 apiece. He has used the finest-bred sires he could obtain, and with system and scientific calculation has multiplied the number of his droves, seemingly unaffected by the statistician with startling array of figures who showed how the electric mo tor, the street car and the bicycle were displacing the equine race and in future the principal market for the noble steed woula be in ; the form of tinned meats for the foreign trade. Yet despite the prophecies of the seers, there promises to be, and in fact here has already com menced, such a revival in the horse bus iness as the country has not seen in many years, and such horsemen as Mr. Hull may yet reap the reward of the faithful. The very statistician who was so busy a year or two ago...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

M ¥Ji« Hop. TO KEEP OUT OUR HOPS. That's What an English Writar Wants His Country to Do. "LnnttHn", writing in Mark I>ane Express, London, says it is time the British government put a tariff1 on bops to protect her own growers from Ameri can competition. We extract the follow ing from his article: "Recent years have very clearly proved that in the business of hop growing America need not fear the competition of the world. Her soil, her climate, and fa cilities of transit give her adyautages which are possessed hy no other country in the world. All the local demand can Ite amply supplied by native plantations, :md there will always he an available surplus sent to European untl other mar kets. American hops havealrendy taken a firm hold of the English consumers and the expansion of the trade in them can only be checked by the application of a liitle common sense to the consideration of an import duty. "The Americans know this too wel[ for our comfort, and are inclined to smile at o...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

Markets. • •': ■;. 11l 'TTKR. ' -i w U Seattle—Ranch 14(»17c; Washington creameries, L'2c; lowa creamery 21c. \ Tacoma— W»ish. „ creamery, 23c. lb. ; Cnl. and lowa creamery 17@21c. ' . . CIIEKSE. SeaUle--Wasu. full cream 10@12>^c; eastern full cream 10c; half cream 8(«9c; ) Tacoma-Wash, full cream 10<»18p.; eastern full ofeaih 10c, BOOS. Seattle "''• Tacoiim Siiiiil" Portland "® (' Spokane ■ ■■ IIOIM ♦ «•» *-.>, ; ' POUT/TKV. ■" • Chickens— Seattle •..•••,.. P* 1'1 < )Z - r" •;• ■•' ' Tacoma.,.. •' ' r ''X,|-( r ■ Portland •• • " ," 2.5003.50 5p0kane......:.. ..:........ " " .t.fiofi&4.oo Spoknno " WW.HI Knurrs. Apples— : ■ • Seattle ...Yakiina audf>V rpuatchco fl.fiß«<*:' i. ..' Kastern . l.» Tacoma ...... Eastern Washington 1.7f1®8 I'OTATOKS. Seattle .:. East. Washington 15@17.00 Taoamu ri-S3B iV ; , f^.';*," " I>f7fjlM Chicago- Common steers ']-l['s'Yi'- Pritnfl steers 4.oU®4.*n SIIKKI'. Tacoma JhfSM^ Chicago Westerns $4.25@5.25 BOGB. Tacoma 3#?2^? 'V4 Ch...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 April 1897

16 Goods ett Cost for tl*e> Next 0O I>oL>rs ! For the next sixty days I will sell at cost Dry Goods, Gents' Furnishing Goods, 1 Hosiery, Boots,, Shoes, Furnishing Goons, Tinware, Woodenware and Notions , -^- THIS IS A BONA-FIDE SALE! -^~ ' I am going to Chicago to bring back an immense new stock, therefore must make room in my store by selling all goods on band at ACTUAL COST! The Racket Store. Christ filler. JOHN SAWBRIDGE, ..__ HARDWARE. ■"-■■ ■ ■ . '■'■.. \ \ . -~ All kinds Farm Implements, Majestic Sire) Ranges,- White Sowing Machines, -John Poero Plows, D. M. OsKornV di Co. Mowers and Hakes, (\>lnin!>iu Hindeiv. [\ YAKIMA AYE. NORTH YAK IM A: ask YOUR GROCER FOR HOME product. Victor Patent I'lour Red Star Flour and Whole Wheat Flour. ■ GRAIN, FEED AND SEEDS, . BOLD BY —— North Mima Mill Store, Opposite P. 0. JANECK'S PHARMACY, Pure Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Dye Stuff's, Choice.Perfumery anil Toilet Articles. Pure wines and liquors for ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 April 1897

Ranche and Range. VOI,. I, NO. 2. VALUE OF HARROWING. BY ED. WKU.KW. In riding over our county a few days ago the writer noticed many fields being plowed for grain, potatoes, hops, etc. More than one-half of the plowed fields were just as the plow left them, some very poorly plowed, some rough and un even, while in a few cases the harrow or "drag" had followed the plow. We certainly have one of the best farming countries in the world, but even here such begin nings will not result in successful farming. Here, where we have warm, sunny days and occasional dry winds, the harrow should follow the plow if good results are to be obtained. Never allow plowed fields to remain exposed to the sun and dry air, but pulverize the surface as quickly as possible. In this way the moisture is retained, germination hastened, irrigation delayed, better crops assured, and much time and labor saved. • It is surely a serious mistake to expose a rough surface of the soil and let the moisture evaporate si...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 April 1897

.'. Irrigation. DON'T DO IT. Wenatchee Valley Citizens Should Not Bond Themselves to Build Their Canal. The following sensible editorial ap (•oared in the last issue of the Wenatchee Advance: "In last week's i-Mie of the Advance was published a letter from one ol our citizens in which lie advocate 1 the plac ing of $100,000 bonds on the Wenatchce Irrigation District under the provisions of the Wright law. It is far from our wish lo siiv anything which could be considered as opposed toanv economi cal system of securing water for the val lay, but we do not think the placing of so heavy 11 deb' upon the district would be advisable. While the irrigation of the valley might perhaps he belter and more economically accomplished under the Wright law than by private corpora lious, it is far from a settled fact that it would be so under the conditions exist ing here. OI about forty-five irrigation districts in California organized un der the' Wright law there can scarcely be found ;i half do/...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 April 1897

HgriGullur©. BRIGHT PROSPECTS AHEAD. There has never been a time when the outlook for the development of diversi fied agricultural industries in the Pacific Northwest was so bright as it is now. As has been pointed out before in tills paper, we have made remarkable progress in that direction during the past five years. The development in dairying lias been the most marked, petit a of any branch of farming. The fruit growing industry has outgrown, the boom period and is beginning to bring returns for the large amount of money and labor which has hi en invested therein, and the experi ence of the past live years has been of untold value in pointing out the way for future profitable development of this great industry— while other stales have reduced the number and increased in yield. We have entirely cut off the im portation of poultry from the east and have reduced that, oi eggs to an insignifi cant quantity. The production of seeds is becoming an important addition to our agricultura...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 April 1897

4 HortiGulturs. PICKING, PACKING AND MARKETING. Suggestions by One who has been Nearly a Halt Century a Horticuurist. IIV .1. M. IIIXSON. When your fruit is ready forgathering, packing and marketing great care and judgment should lie used. No matter what the variety, it should be picked carefully and the stems left in the fruit. Of some varieties the trees should be gone ovei carefully and the matured fruit picked and I bat not fully matured left for the future picking. Great care should be used not to exposed picked fruit to the sun, and if the sun be hot it should he put in the shade and allowed to cool off before packing. Winter apples should be put in binaorptlei on the floor and allowed to bo through a sweat before beiug packed. All fruit should be assorted as to size and quality before being packed, and each grade packed and marked separately. It is a very important thing that the va riety ancl quality o! fruit be'marked on e:ieli pankage, for each time a box of fruit is opene...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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