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Title: Washington Farmer Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 20 items from Washington Farmer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

W *W* HP T-T TT\ Wasminoton Fa rm c r. 2 SUCCESSOR TO THE RANCH **«-£*•* "* VOL. XXXV. NO. 12. NORTHERN PACIFIC DAIRY AND POULTRY FARMS THOUSANDS of passengers traveling on the Northern Pacific Railway have * been impressed with the colony of red dairy barns, silos, stables and poultry houses half a mile south of Kent on the east side of the track. Across the buildings facing the track, only 40 rods away, in letters eight feet high is the slogan of this company, "The Route of the Great Big Baked Potato." During the night this sign together with one 60 feet long and 20 feet high marks the place with electrical illumination. This is the home of the Northern Pacific Dairy and Poultry Farms which supply the fresh milk, fresh cream and fresh eggs to the patrons of the Northern Pacific dining cars. At this beautiful farm is owned a fine herd of Holstein cows and 6000 White Leghorn hens which produce the entire supply of milk, cream and eggs used by this great railway system. Mr. Hazen J. ...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

2 Equip your dairy barn with a Hinman Milker and increase your profits - • * • The Hinman Milker will increase your profits by HlN^l^fJ^J^ insuring a clean sanitary the universaljmjlker Hinman will do the work of several hired milkers — and do the work better. I want to tell you more about this machine and show it to you in operation. It will save money for you and at the price it sells for, you cannot afford to be without it. The Free Booklet will tell you more about it. Send for it today. E. E. BURNS Distributor for Washington Mount Vernon, Wash. M . Saves Your Horses 1 Saves Your Harness 1 I by making the load pull easier. ; You will I I notice this as soon as you start using I I KAlf* X AXLE W I IVIICA GPEASE *: I It's the mica that does it. It fills up the W^J^ H microscopic pores on spindles and sleeves **>Jj\m M and makes them smoother — better bearing ]jKj|f 1 surfaces. Mica Axle Grease is also eco- mMmL M nomical. You use only about one-half -^ JBjJjij ■ as much as of an...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

J. D. Dean, Editor Prof A. B Nystrom Dairy Granvii.lk Lowther Horticulture 1) Tancrkd Poultry Hattik Hainks Churchill The Home Margaret Wyh I he Children C. S. Whitmore, Advertising Manager New York Representative: S. E. Leith, 200 Fifth Aye. Bldg. Chicago Kepresentitive: D. C. Kreidler, Steger Building. St. Louis Representative: C. A. Cour, 410 Globe-Democrat Bldg. THE WASHINGTON FARMER To express more fully the scope of its work and to conform to its future policy, the name of this paper with this issue changes to Tne Washington Farmer. This publication recently passed to the ownership of Miller Freeman, of Seattle, its founder, who published it for several years as The Ranch, and who is thoroughly familiar with agricultural conditions in the North west. Changes in these conditions, as well as changes in general business conditions, call for a change in the policy of the farm paper that is to render the best service to agriculture in this state. The business of farm ing in Washing...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

4 PUBLIC GRAIN ELEVATOR PORT OF SEATTLE, NOW BEING BUILT No subject is of more importance to the grain growers in the PaciHc Northwest than proper and reason able priced dockade and storage facilities. With this end in view a large delegation of prominent wheat growers of Eastern Washington dur ing the winter came to the Sound to consult with the Seattle Port Com mission to determine how soon the big dockage and storage facilities contemplated by the Commission would be ready for use. The result of the visit was most satisfactory. The port commission expressed itself as using every possible measure to push the work to a rapid completiou. The Washington Farmer knowing the interest grain growers are taking in this matter asked Gen. Chittenden, chairman of the Board for the facts, giving us the status of the proposed buildings. On request Mr. Paul Whitman, chief engineer of the Commission has favored us with the following article which explains the matter in detail: The graill of the P...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

When the amount of rainfall is from 12 to 20 inobes, four pounds each of alfalfa and orchard grass per acre, makes about the only combination of perennials that will do for pasture. For short time pasture, rye is one of the best for the dry sections. It should be planted in the fall for that purpose. In extremely dry sections, where the annual rainfall is less than 12 inches, alfalfa planted in rows and cultivated will yield a good crop. Soiling Crops GREEN LEGUMES-The crops which come under this head are the clovers, alfalfa, vetches and Held peas. These are sometimes pastured off to good advantage and for reasoni given in the discussion of pasture this practice is commendable. How ever, the nature of the legumes, espe cially the alfalfa, is such as to cause bloating easily, and these should, therefore, be pastured with extreme care. The presence of moisture either from dew or rain on the legumes while the cow is grazing increases the tendency to bloat. A safer plan is to use these...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

6 CONCRETE FENCE POSTS Concrete baa taken the place of wood in so many instances that one is no longer surprised at its adoption for any purpose. The latest use to which it is being put and with great success is its substitution for wood as fence posts. Nearly all the farm ers in the Middle West are adopting the concrete fence post on account of its permanent qualities, neat appear ance and low cost. Many of the rail roads are fencing their right-of-ways with it and the use of it has grown to such an extent that the govern ment has cone to the trouble and ex pense of getting out a bulletin of sev eral pages recommending its use to farmers, giving full and explicit de tails as to how to make the concrete post, what materials to use, the prop er method of re-enforcing and how to make the forms. The principal agri cultural colleges of the country, after thoroughly testing it, advise its use and the lowa State College of Agri culture at Ames, lowa, perhaps the leading agricultural colle...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

A MODERN DAIRY BARN BY C. J. ZINTHEO, Ag. Eng., Seattle, Wash. A great many farmers who have been in the dairy business for some time and who are prompted by the progressive spirit of the times to in crease their herd and provide more room for cows, or who have become disgusted with the unsanitary con dition of their present barn and de sire to have a modern barn comply ing with the requirements of sanitary regulations are puzzled with the problem of how to obtain the room and modern conveniences and still be within reach of their financial means. The design of a modern barn here with presented is made with the idea of meeting these requirements. This barn designed for 50 cows can be made either larger or smaller as the farmers acreage and number of cows require, and it can also be extended as the 'herd of cows increases. The old dairy barn can usually be ren ovated and rearranged for a horse barn, hay-mow, granary and place for young stock and with a good coat of paint can be made ...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

8 WANTS CHANGE IN ROAD LAW King County Pomona Grange held its bi-mootbly meeting at Washington hall, Seattle, last Thursday. An ex periment was had to see if the at tendance could be obtained in the city. The attendance was somewhat disappointing. A very pleasant meeting was held but little business was transacted. A vote of tbe Granges will be taken giving a place of meeting and dates for a year in advance so all can be informed. Some speakers attending the tax institute in the city were invited and Mr. Anderson gave one of the most instructive talks on this subject ever heard by the Grangers. Mr. Ander son understands the matter and it is to be hoped he will be able to get other audiences. Pass Resolution Regarding Road Matters A resolution submitted by the Tax payers Protective League, which it is hoped will decrease cost of road su pervision and work for better results, was passed unanimously. This re ceived first the endorsement of the committee consisting of Messrs. Mess, Cott...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

POULTRY POULTRY FOR IH£ FARMER Farming may be divided into two classes: The specialist and the gen eral. The specialist may consist of a single crop or it may be two, these the farmer devotes his entire time and energy to. We have the fruit, berry, alfalfa, cattle, truck, poultry farmer, each of these being special ized by the different farmers. The general farmer has variety for his crop. It may consist of grain, fruit, hoes, a few cows, a few hives of bees and some poultry. On the farm of the "specialist" as well as on the farm of the "general farmer" is to be found flocks of poul try, ranging in numbers of from R dozen to several hundred head. The 1910 census tell us that the av erage egg yield per hen found on both classes of farmers is 80 eggs. But on tbe farmer that makes egg farming his specialty the average yield is 110 per year per fowl. Here we have a difference of two and one-half dozen eggs in favor of the egg farmer. There must be a reason for this difference and there ...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

10 DAIRY AND CREAMERY By Prof. A. B. Nystrom, Dairy Instructor State College, Pullman, Wash. (For any information regarding this department, write the above.) COST TO RAISE A CALF TO TWO AND ONE-HALF YEARS OF AGE On the average dairy farm where the work of feeding and caring for the stock and operating the farm is done by two or more men it is a diffi cult matter to determine exactly what it costs to raise a calf. It we were to consider carefully every item of ex pense we would find that our heifers are costing us more than we sup posed. Too often we feel that any labor done in connection with the feeding and caring for calves should not be charged against the calf be catise the services are rendered out side of working hours and are a sort of a recreation. To be sure the own er of good stock takes pleasure in be ing with his calves morning and even ing and watching them grow, still If he were to hire the work done he would find it.necessary to pay regular wages and he should theref...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

to take a 2x4 upon which the stan chions are to be bolted; two feet two inches wide and six inches deep for the manger, the depth being taken from the top of the 2x4 upon which the stanchions are placed, thus mak ing the floor of the manger level with the floor of the stall. Then the pas sageway in front of the cows can be six feet between the outer edges of the mangers, which will give ample room for feediDg purposes. How ever, if it is desired to drive down the passageway to feed a soiling crop it should be two feet wider. These measurements will make your barn 34 or 36 feet wide over all depending upon the width of the passage be tween the cows. The swinging stan chion is preferable, and it can be swung in frames made of 2x6's if the regular pipe frame is not secured. If you are going to have Holstein or other large cows it is well to have the stalls a little deeper than four and one-half on the average, perhaps vary ing in width from four and one-half feet on one end to tive fee...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

12 NEW DAIRY RECORD The Guernsey cow "May Kilma 227(51," owned and bred by Capt. E. B. Cassatt, at his famou9 Chester- brook Farm, Berwyn, Pa., has just completed her official year's work. The making of large records and the possibilities of the dairy cow to yield maximum results at the pail is a matter of more than passing inter est to her owners. The producer wishes to know the cost of production and if his margin of profit is being increased under better methods. The consumer also, regardless of all breed questions, hopes it may mean to him better and cheaper milk, for he it is who in the end pays the bill. Whether it is a Guernsey, Holstein or a Jersey that holds the pennant for production simply shows which breed is making the most progress aloDg scientific lines and showing results. The name of the cow, the breed she represents and her wonderful record, should be known by all as a matter of dairy history. May Kilma produced in. 365 days from May 1, 1913 to May 1, 1914, 19673 p...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

THE HOME By Hattie Haines Churchill Questions will be cheerfully answer ed by mail if postage is sent. Write to the manager of this department and tell what you would like best to ap pear in these columns. We want the housewives to look forward with pleas ure to reading this part of The Farmer A CREED From the Detroit Free Press. Faith in him who calls me friend, Faith in what is sweet and clean ; Faith that just around the bend All is peaceful and serene. Faith that after care and strife Come the happy days of rest; Faith that everything in life Really happens for the best. This is my faith and this is my shield 'Gainst the arrows of distrust; Much of justice is concealed In what seems to be unjust. Now what seems a dismal way That alone I'm forced to tread I may come to see some day Is a glorious path instead. Undisturbed by petty wrongs, Undismayed by wnat is mean, Though the false attracts the throngs, Though the multitude unclean, Though at times L stand alone, Though I'm oft m...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

14 Children's Page Address all communications for this page to Margaret Wye, care of The Washington Farmer. Well, 1 presume that school is over for all of you by this time and I dare say you have earned your vacation by hard work all during the school year May you all enjoy your vaca tion, dearies! Now our contest work for June is about this very vacation to which you have looked forward so long. The subject is, "My Idea of a Pleasant Vacation." The prize is a dainty book—one of Longfellow's sweetest story-poems. Those of you who are trying for the January-June prize have your June contribution to submit. I want all of The Ranch children—and 1 mean all, whether you have ever writ ten for our children's page or not—l want you all to be on the watch for the July copy to see what the new plan is for you. In the meantime— enjoy your vacation. Spring Nellie De Govyer. Age 10. The sun is shining brightly. The trees are blooming white, The rain is falling lightly— It is a glorious sight. T...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

LIVE STOCK ALLEGED "CHOLERA CURES" WASHINGTON, D. C, June 10.- Evidence of what appears to be a well organized campaign to delude farmers throughout the country into buying an alleged cure for hog cholera, under the impression that this has been in vestigated and approved by the United States Government, has reached the , Department of Agriculture. Articles praising this medicine, Benetol by name, are being sent out widespread to newspapers. These articles are so BCKjfeftißMwl 7A. 'HI S HSSfiH • STANDARDIZED. EASY AND SAFE TO USE INEXPENSIVE KILLS LICE ON ALL LIVE STOCK DISINFECTS. CLEANSES. PURIFIES. It has so many uses that It Is a necessity on every farm. USED IN THE TREATMENT OF MANGE, SCAB, RINGWORM, SCRATCHES, ETC. Destroys Disease Germs DRIVES AWAY FLIES For Sale by All Druggists Write for Free Booklets PARKE, DAVIS & CO. — DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY DETROIT, - - MICHIGAN \ Warrantedto Satisfaction. ft Gombautt's I Caustic Balsam I Has Imitators But No Competitors. A S...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

16 HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT GRANVILLE LOWTHER, Editor, North Yakima, Wash. Any information regarding this department answered free by the editor. PEAR OR CHERRY SLUG I am in receipt of a letter from James Morrison, Watson, Oregon, in which he says: "Last year my pear and cherry trees were so badly infected with slugs that two sets of foliage were completely devoured by them. What shall I do to control the pest? "Will kerosene emulsioD and ar senateof lead be of benefit combined? "About the time the cherries are ripe are when the slugs are the worst. Is it dangerous to use the poison at this time? There seems to be two generations of the slugs. They dis appear altogether for a short time soon after the cherries have ripened, then they reappear again in increased numbers. Give their life history and how they propagate, also what is con sidered the best practice in control ling this.pest?" Answer: 1. Arsenate of lead will kill the slug. White Hellebore, one pound to 50 pounds of water,...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

the top roots; however deeply these roots may penetrate into the soil in order that the tree may not be up rooted by winds that sway its heavy top system, the fact remains that the feeding roots are near the surface. It is this fact that should guide the orchiirdist in determining whether his trees should have clean cultivation or whether instead there should be some kind of grass or cover crop which will keep down the weeds and render plowing or cultivation unnec essary. In determining the kind of cover crop, if the soil is rich in humus and nitrogenous substances, it may be improved by the growing of blue grass, timothy, or some such product. But if as is true in most of the volcanic ash soils of the arid and semi-arid regions of the Northwest, the soil needs humus and nitrogen, then a nitrogen gathering crop should be grown and clean cultivation en- Get Your Canadian Home €|f From the Canadian Pacific 17771' E will make you a long time i; lYy I loan —you can move on the | Rsj lan...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

18 Hollywood Farm Holsteins We have several young bulls for sale that will develop Into excellent herd Bires. Our herd contains the choicest strains of the Holsteln-Friesiau breed, and we are breed ing the most approved type of this great Dairy Cattle. We also breed Duroc-Jersey Hogs of the most profitable type, and offer breeding stock of both sexes and of all ages. LET US KNOW YOUR WANTS or come and visit our farm and see our stock. Hollywood Farm HOLLYWOOD, WASH. P. 8. BTIMBON, C. W. PETERS, Owner. Manager. Your Bull May Be Losing $6,000 Every Year A record kept by a careful breeder recently showed that one of his bulls produced stock that was worth $6,000 more that the get of another bull sup posed to have been of equal value. You do not want to take a chance on a $6,000 loss every year. The only way to insure yourself against it is to buy a herd bull of the best blood lines, but one whose ancestors are proven producers. We have some young bulls that will develop into money-earn...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS RATE—Two cent* per word each insertion. Ca»h must accompany all orders for classified advertisements. Dairy Supplies DE Laval agents will show you the advan tages of this lino of dairy machinery. De Laval Dairy Supply, 1016 Western *ye., Seattle. THE efficient Simplex Separator will increase your dairy profits. Send for the catalog that will tell yon more of BLK Milkers and our line of dairy machinery and barn equip ment. Dairy Machinery Co., 907 Western Aye.. Seattle. ApHE dependable Rock Island Separator should -*■ be a part of your dairy equipment. Let us tell you about it. R. M. Wade <& Co., 39 Haw thorn Aye , Portland, Ore. Milking Machines T*HE Hiuman Milker—simple, easy to oper- J. ate—will save money for you. Write for circulars aud prices. E. E. Burns, State Dis tributor, Mt. Vernon, Wash. Building Material BUY direct—we save you money Bend for the free catalog. P. A. Kovig &Co , 1120 Western Aye., Seattle, Wn. BETTER lumber for less mon...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Washington farmer. — 15 June 1914

20 STATE GRANGE ANNUAL MEETING The Washington State Grange met June 2nd at North Yakima. The meeting was one of the most enthusi astic held by the Grange for many years. The attendance reached more than 400. Some notable addresses were given and it was a splondia gathering of the leading farmers of the state. Membership Now Exceeds 1500 The report of Secretary Fred W. Lewis showed a slight decrease in the membership, showing the member ship at the present time to be 15,455. There are 321 subordinate Granges in good standing in the state. The loss is accounted for by the fact that in the past year the policy of dropping all delinquent members has been in augurated and the present roll repre sents the actual active paid-up mem bership. Witnin the year 24 new granges were organized and Ove re organized, while 25 were lost, a net gain of four. The greatest member ship gain was in Skagit, Clarke and Cowlitz counties, and the heaviest losses in Okanogan, King and Stevens counties. In Yaki...

Publication Title: Washington Farmer
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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