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Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

BOSTON PILOT. F*. DONAHOB, < editor, ) T. D. M’GEE. t IRISH CORRESPONDENT. 5 BE JUST, AHD FEAR NOT LET ALL THE ENDS THOU AIM'ST AT, BE THY GOD'S, THY COUNTRY'S, AND TRUTWS. < OFFICE, I 1 No. 1, Spring Lane. 5 $2.50::::3ti 'Abimnte. Boston, Saturban, January 3, 183tG. ftolumc i*::::No. 1.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
POETRY. A SHORT MEDITATION ON THE CRUCIFIX. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

POETRY. A SHORT MEDITATION ON THE CRUCIFIX. Tablet. Say, sinful soul, with bosom cold, Canst thou that bleeding form survey, Canst thou that drooping head behold, And not with love dissolve away ? Canst thou those arms extended view Upon that sin-atoning tree, And whilst no tears thine eyes bedew, Reflect—sweet Jesus died for thee ? 0, ever-blessed Saviour give My grateful soul with love to glow, > For thee alone, O make me live, Or die, ere I become thy foe ! Alas ! sweet Saviour, when I view Thy agonising, writhing pains, What tears on tears mine eyes bedew, While blood thy sacred face distains ! O, glorious, glittering, dazzling price Of the world’s ransom ! blood divine ! Awful, tremendous sacrifice ! I’he guilt was ours, the pangs were thine. O, sight that harrows up the soul ! Say, Lamb of God, why dost thou bleed ? Could love for man thy breast control To expiate thus his guilty deed ? Oh, what, bright King of glory ! say, Could bring thee down from realms above, O...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Scraps. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

Scraps. Out west a lover calls his mistress a jewsharp ot delight, and a healing plaster for pain in the breast. Fighting for Salvation. The Methodists and Baptists at Little Rock, Ark., who used the chapel on alternate Sundays, had a fight for the possession of it a few weeks since. This is somewhat more sectarian than “ close communion.” Death of a Missionary. The Quebec Canadian states the melancholy death of the Rev. C. E. Belanger, Catholic missionary at Somerset. He had been alisent on a visit to one of his missions, and when returning home on Sunday, accompanied by two men, lost his way in crossing a swamp, and, with his companions, perishetl of cold. The deceased clergyman was 32 years of age. i

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Ireland THE EIGHTY-TWO CLUB. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

Ireland THE EIGHTY-TWO CLUB. We continue the very interesting proceedings of this patriotic body. The Chairman rose and said—Brothers (loud cheers), the next toast I have to propose is that which we denominate our charter toast (cheers) —the test of our political creed (cheers) —the vow that we renew at these our meetings, that we shall be contented with nothing less than the legislative independence of our country (cheers). 1 do not think it necessary upon the present occasion to trespass upon your time by any protracted arguments to prove to you that the legislative independence of Ireland would promote the happiness of the Irish people (cheers). You feel as I do that upon that subject argument with us is unnecessary (cheers). Your minds hav e long been convinced of this truth, and not only your own minds, but the minds of those w hom we may, with some propriety, consider, if not as our constituents, at least as identified with us in feeling in all that we do—l mean the sp-eat maj...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
BOSTON FRIENDS OF IRELAND. ENTHUSLASTIC MEETING—OREGON, &C. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

BOSTON FRIENDS OF IRELAND. ENTHUSLASTIC MEETING—OREGON, &C. The regular monthly meeting of the Boston Repeal Association was held at Amory Hall last Tuesday evening, when 1 the large hall was completely filled with an intelligent, respectable, and enthusiastic audience. The President having taken the chair, the minutes of the last meeting were read by the Secretary. The Treasurer, Terence M’Hugh, Esq., then submitted his annual report, which is as follows: Amount received by the Treasurer for the year 1845, including balance on hand from the year 1841 2201*51 Remitted to Ireland in 1845 $1242*22 Current expenses for the year 192,>4 Cash in Treasurer’s hands 510,78 $2203,54 Mr. M’Hugh also stated that since 1841, the Society had remitted to Ireland upwards of £1800 sterling. Mr. James, the President, then addressed the meeting. Those who were present on the last evening would recollect that it was then his duty to call attention to the condition of their native...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Irish Parliament. O’CONNELL'S DEFENCE OF HIMSELF. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

Irish Parliament. O’CONNELL'S DEFENCE OF HIMSELF. At the meeting of the Repeal Association on the 24th of November, Mr. O’Connell delivered the following triumphant vindication of himself against the, slanders of the Times Commissioner. Liberator —1 wish to state, with reference to the registry, that up to Saturday last, we had a majority on this registry of 129. (Cheers.) We have up to this day a majority of 131, and if the people who can register will only attend to-morrow, and the day after, and the day after, we shall be able to put on the registry roll two or three hundred more. (Hear, hear.) — The great advantage of their coming forward in this, that we would then have such a large majority that we could carry the election without any great expense. (Hear, hear.) We would have the city in our hands, and the consequence would he that those worthy gentlemen, Messrs. Grogan and Gregory, would have to look for a representation elsewhere. (Hear, hear.) The next thing I have to do i...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
IRELAND!-AMERICA!-ENGLAND!-OREGON! [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

IRELAND!-AMERICA!-ENGLAND !-OREGON! We make the following extract from a splendid speech, delivered by thut champion of Irish rights, William Smith O’Brien, at the meeting of the Irish Parliament on the first of December:— “ I wish it to be distinctly understood, that I am merely stating here as I would in the British House of Commons, my own individual opinions [hear, hear.] 1 have consulted no person—not even the committee of the association, and it is possible that many of my suggestions will not receive the approval ol all those who hear them ; but on an occasion, such as the present, I think it l ight to unfold candidly and without reservation, every thing which has occurred to my mind [hear, hear.] In this spirit I am about to allude to unother topic —I mean the present posture of affairs in America [cheers.] I cannot regard the contingency of a war with America otherwise than as a thing to be deeply deplored. I know that the population of this country are so fond of fighting ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THREATS OF COERCION. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

THREATS OF COERCION. From the Dublin Nation. As the fitting answer to some insolent language of the Standard, upon this subject, we last week took occasion to enlarge somewhat upon a text furnished by the Standard’s master, “that Repeal could not be put down by force.” There has been in this country, during the year which is just expiring, a great and unwonted activity in seeking for advantageous investment of capital in commercial and industrial speculations. Railway enterprise alone has assumed so gigantic and, with all its dangers of over speculation, so benignant an aspect, that we may fairly promise ourselves a vast and permanent improvement in the material resources of the country and comforts of the People. But there is one condition without which none of all these benefits can be looked for, and that is Peace. It is in reliance upon a continuance of internal tranquillity that we invest our capital in railroads; not for the sake of transporting troops, but of facilitating tra...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
OLIVER CROMWELL. TO THE EDITOR OF THE DUBLIN FREEMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

OLIVER CROMWELL. TO THE EDITOR OF THE DUBLIN FREEMAN. Carrick-on-Suir, Nov. 6, 1845. “ Those statues will give us a perpetual subject of discussion.”— O’Connell. Sir—The following “ characters' ’ of that ruthless monster, Cromwell, may amuse your readers. I am, Sir, yours, R. H. B. “With an absolute indifference to all that is praiseworthy or blameless, honest or dishonest, he never considered virtue'as virtue, crime as crime; he regarded ‘only the relation which the one or the othermight have to his elevation. This was his idol; he sacrificed to it his King his country and his religion. Cromwell was an illustrious villain. — Abbe Raynai,.. “ He was a tyrant .” — Algernon Sidney. “A subtle and refined Aypocrife.”— Bosscrt. “ He was a coward. — Lord Holles. “ With all his faults although he was a coward at first, &c. &c.”—Sir Roger Manley. “A fortunate fool .”— Cardinal Mazarine. “A dexterous villain , a bloody usurper.”—Voltaire. “ If ever there appeared in a...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

THE UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN THE PILOT'. Saturday; January s, iB4o. The slochan of battle is again thundering in our ears. “The plumed troop,” and all “the circumstance of glorious war,” are dancing in the imaginations of statesmen, orators and editors. The three classes are convulsed with the perilous anticipation. Merchants, manufacturers and capitalists look with pitiful gloom upon “the prospect of things,” and with a most grave absence of all patriotisrp and regard for national honor, ask if Oregon can now furnish markets for commerce; if the manufactured staples find a market there, or if land can he purchased so as to sell at a premium in this generation. No, no, no; — ergo, awar ► .would he unjust, cruel, barbarous, behind the age, not to be tolerated—not to be thought of. Think of the properly that would be destroyed! The commerce that would be prostrated! The fall in the stocks! And all the long train of mischiefs that would result in a war with our kindred in langua...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
OUR CANADA NEIGHBORS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

OUR CANADA NEIGHBORS. The Quebec Freeman’s Journal, alluding to our report of the meeting of the 13th ult., for the relief of suffering Ireland, after a high eulogium on the patriotic sympathies of the Irishmen in Boston, speaks thus:—“How we could contend with these noble fellows, in the event of a war, we know not, and therefore we trust, for the sake of all, that some more humane and amicable expedient will be had recourse to ere the ever to be deplored alternative of hostile collision between both nations, be resorted to” —and again—“we must tell our fellow-countrymen in the Union, that by the canonical laws of the Catholic Church, we are told to honor the powers that be, and that, if eventually they should be foolish enough to enter our adopted country in a hostile manner, among the foremost we would be to repel aggression, no matter who the aggressors may be.” We direct the attention of those who doubt the fidelity of the Irishmen in Boston, if there be any such, to these pass...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
NOTES FROM "A JOURNAL IN IRELAND.” FIRST SERIES.—NO. VIII. THE IRISH LITERATURE OF NOVEMBER. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

NOTES FROM "A JOURNAL IN IRELAND.” FIRST SERIES.—NO. VIII. THE IRISH LITERATURE OF NOVEMBER. Dublin, Nov. 3d, 1845. I. Sketches in Erris and Tyramley, by Caesar Otway, (Second Edition.' 11. The Round Towers of Ireland, by George Petrie (.Second Edition.) 111. Moore’s Melodies, illustrated by Maclise. IV. The Speeches of Curran, with a Memoir by the late Thomas Davis. V. The Songs of Ireland, edited bv M» J. Barry. VI. The Dublin University Magazine. I think you will admit that this list presents a gootl month’s fare for the mind of Ireland. From the very highest to the very humblest man, there is a volume suited for each. From Barry’s excellent collection of Songs, and Otway’s Sketches, up to Petrie’s work, and Maclise’s, there is a production for every class. To give you some notion of the industry of these mind laborers of Ireland, Mr. Petrie has consulted or quoted over five hundred Irish Manuscripts in the composition of his work, beside all the printed works that touch the subj...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MONUMENT AT CORK TO BISHOP ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

MONUMENT AT CORK TO BISHOP ENGLAND. Cork has erected a monument to her illustrious son, the late Bishop of Charleston. The native city of John England, as far as marble can attest it, remembers him with pride. It is a gothic frame-work, containing two female figures, between them the bust of the celebrated deceased. Beneath runs the inscription. This wise remembrance of so great a Prelate, might well prompt his admirers in South Carolina to an imitation. A monument in Charleston has long been spoken of, but should have been up before any noise was made of it. The diocese owes it to him ns its first Bishop—the Irishmen of the South owe it to their greatest elevator and best advocate—the Catholic Church owes it as the most eloquent expounder of its doctrines and the chiefest champion of its historic character. The place where a good man is born has a right to be proud of his birth—but the place where a good man lived and labored, has a greater right to be grateful to his memory.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PUSEYISM PROGRESSIVE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

PUSEYISM PROGRESSIVE. Every newspaper from England brings us tidings more and more of secessions from Anglicanism and of accessions to Catholicity. The best and most studious men of the neighboring country are pouring back into the great bosom of the One Fold of the Shepherd. Seeing that our ancestors assisted St. Augustine to convert their ancestors, it is very gratifying to us to find that England has found the folly of her ways, and is returning again to the path which Ireland first showed her, and which this country never swerved from. I would be the more rejoiced at this, if I did not learn on unquestionable authority that those new Catholics, with few exception*, are fierce haters of this land. I can in no way account for it, save that they are jealous of our fame for fidelity to the old Faith. But though they do not wish Ireland well, w r e are above returning their silly hatred. As Catholics, we rejoice over their reclamation, as Irishmen we mourn their ill-will. We can do w...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE ACADEMIC EDUCATION BILL. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

THE ACADEMIC EDUCATION BILL. The Academic Bill has been submitted to the decision of Rome. It will now be finally determined whether or not it is detrimental to faith and morals. This reference prevents its further introduction at Conciliation Hall, where, in the first place, its discussion was impolitic and uncalled for. The Repeal Association is for one object alone, the Repeal of the Union. Any thing that directly concerns that'question either in our foreign or domestic relations, is there revelant and pertinent—all others are extraneous, and should be excluded. This conviction is now general, and the Association in consequence, will work better and more straightforwardly in future. Trying times await us. Farewell.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
OUR NEW VOLUME. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

OUR NEW VOLUME. Our readers will give us credit for furnishing them with one of the most beautifully printed papers ever published in the United States. Our w hole material is new, and is from the foundery of George Curtis, Esq., who has attained considerable celebrity as a type founder. The advertising type is beautiful, and we are sure that our patrons will like our news-type —it is clear and distinct and easily read. Our Piiess, too, is nothing the worse of the wear, and will do good service many years to come. With these splendid materials we shall be able, with God’s assistance, to combat the enemies of the Church, and the vile calumniators of our Irish population. When we look back to the time when we resuscitated the Pilot, (eight years ago) we have reason to be proud of the rapid strides it has made under our auspices. No journal in America has advanced more rapidly than ours. We commenced with but few subscribers —few friends—and w ithout a dollar in our pocket—but by hard ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
RELIEF TO IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

RELIEF TO IRELAND. There will be an adjourned meeting of the friends of the Irish poor, on Monday evening next, January sth, at the Odeon. On which occasion it is. hoped that all those who feel disposed in aiding such a laudable charity, will be present and manifest their willingness by contributing to alleviate the sufferings of their kindred in fatherland, owing to the almost total failure of the crops. The eloquent and learned Dr. O’Flaherty will be present on the occasion, together with other eminent gentlemen who will address the meeting. Lalla Rookh. We see by the papers that a splendid editon of Moore’s “ Falla Rookh” has just been issued by Ceary & Hart of Philadelphia. We have not been fortunate enough to receive a copy of it. Transfiguration Church, N.Y. The Fair, recently held for the benefit of this Church resulted in the handsome -sum of $ 2,666. 89. Christian’s Guidf.. A splendid edition of this popular prayer book has just appeared from the Pilot Press. It...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS. “E. J.” Watertown, Wisconsin. We tender our thanks to you and request that you will act as our Agent. East Wareham. James Farrell, has kiudly consented to act as our Agent here. There are several of our Agents Avho have not written to us as yet concerning had subscribers. We hope they have none to write about. Lubec, Me. Our good friend “H” has none right. We accede to his request Cumberland, Md. We shall be thankful to Mr. G. for any services he may do us in his town. Potosi, Mo. We have an excellent Agent in this place in the person of Mr. Daniel O’Brien. Washington and Georgetown, D.C. We have much pleasure in announcing Mr. Charles F. M’Carthy, as our Agent for the above places. He is fully authorised to settle all accounts. Lippet, R.I. Edward Carroll is appointed as our Agent for this place. DO” We would be thankful to any friend who would furnish us w ith a copy of the ballad entitled “ the Irish Volunteers.” Rutland, Vt. Bee. 29 th, 1845. Sir —This...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SKETCHES FROM CONGRESS. NUMBER III. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

SKETCHES FROM CONGRESS. NUMBER III. Washington, Dec. 29th, 1845. My dear Mr. Pilot, —Since Monday last, | there has been very little done by either House of Congress. The members have been enjoying themselves either by trips to the surrounding cities, or by what Christmas sport they could find here. The Resolutions admitting Texas into the Union, have been signed by the presiding officers of both Houses of Congress, and by the President of the United States. To-day a bill passed both Houses of Congress, making Texas a Collection District, Galveston a Port of Entry, with sev- 1 eral Ports of Delivery, such as Corpus Christi, Metagorda, Velasco, &c. The! Collector is to live at Galveston, and is to receive a salary of $2,000 per year. All these bills and resolutions, regularly passed and signed, will lie taken to Texas, by a messenger from this country. Major Darnell is to leave to-morrow, with the same despatches for Texas. He is a Texian. The Senators from Texas will pro...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TO ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 January 1846

TO ENGLAND. BY W. E. P. HASKELL. Hail! England, liail! thou paragon of all Earth’s follies, vices, luxuries and woes! Thou hypocrite! that fain would’st disenthrall Another’s bondmen, and on thine impose Toils, chains more galling, fetters stronger forged, Tyrannic insolence, stern hunger’s pangs, Workhouses crowded, grave yards overgorged— What fearful retribution o’er thee hangs! Wliat is your parliament! A flock of sheep (Or mutton-heads —whichever name you choose,) Who in tlie track of their Ilk-leaders keep, Nor dare their potent mandates to oppose. What plebeian magi, and patrician fools! Who wisely know the odds ’tween man and horse! Grant thirty thousand to assist your schools, While Albert’s steed takes seventy from your purse! Sneer at the stripes and stars, thou crocodile! Shed philanthropic tears for oun misdeeds; Heed not the beam in thine own eye, meanwhile, Tor Chinese corpses point where glory lead! Still let the Brainhi kiss thy tender sword— Still ride, rough shod,...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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